picture of vpac

Catalog Supplement – Fall 2013


Course Modifications


Program Modifications


Selected Topics

COURSE MODIFICATIONS

ART 337A – Printmaking II: Intaglio
Prerequisites changed to ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200 (formerly ART 237 only). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200. Investigation of contemporary intaglio methods on metal and related materials, including collagraph, photo processes, and cross-media approaches, with black/white and color printing. Projects emphasize problem solving through self-directed form and content in the creation of portfolio-quality work. 6 hours lab.
ART 337B – Printmaking II: Serigraphy (Silkscreen) (3)
Prerequisites changed to ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200 (formerly both ART 237, ART 200). New course description as follows: Prerequisites: ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200. Investigation of the methods and materials used to create serigraphs in a contemporary fine art context. Covered techniques include hand Recommended Preparatory: CADV 350, 352, 380/L. Innovative courses of study. Topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Different topics may be taken for credit. Drawn and digital/photo stencils, multi-color registration, printing with water-based ink, and cross-media approaches. Projects emphasize problem solving through self-directed form and content in the creation of portfolio-quality work. 6 hours lab.
ART 337C – Printmaking II: Lithography (3)
Prerequistites changed to ART 237, Preparatory: ART 200 (formerly both ART 237, ART 200). New course description as follows: Prerequisites: ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200. Contemporary lithographic methods on stone, metal plates, and related materials. Hand-drawn, photo-processes, and cross-media approaches are investigated with black/white and color printing. Projects emphasize problem solving through self-directed form and content in the creation of portfolio-quality work. 6 hours lab.
ART 352 – Visual Effects (3-3)
Prerequisite changed to art majors and minors upper-division standing, or instructor consent (non-majors) (formerly ART 302). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: For art majors and minors upper-division standing, or instructor consent (non-majors). Studies in the conceptualization and techniques of digitally generated visual effects in time-based media. Creative self-expression is emphasized in the production of experimental short videos. 6 hours lab.
ART 579/L – Art Education Across Cultures (2/1)
Change course abbreviation (formerly ART 479/L). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: Junior-standing. Corequisite: 579/L. Provides knowledge and practice in planning art experiences, and increases teacher effectiveness in multi- and cross-cultural teaching of the arts. Incorporates focused activities for graduate students. Meets requirement for multicultural education for Multiple and Single Subject Credentials. Course contains both lecture and lab activities.
ART 586/L – Studio Problems Teaching 3-D Art and Lab (1/2)
Change course abbreviation and title (formerly ART 485 – Studio Problems in Teaching Crafts). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: Junior-standing or permission of instructor. Corequisite: ART 586L. Required for a Single Subject Credential in Art. Develop instructional strategies, organize standards-based curricula, and refine art skills for teaching art in a variety of educational settings. Topics will include the study of art and art education, curriculum development, traditional and emerging art media and materials, and technology in art education. Emphasis will be on the study of three-dimensional art. Final art education portfolio review for art teaching credential students. One hour discussion; four hours studio.
ART 585/L – Studio Problems Teaching 2-D Art and Lab (2/1)
Change course abbreviation and title (formerly ART 486 – Studio Problems in Teaching Art). Change unit value to 2 units (formerly 1 unit). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: Junior-standing or permission of instructor. Corequisite: 586L. Required for a Single Subject Credential in Art. Develop instructional methods, organize standards-based curriculum, and refine art skills for teaching art in a variety of educational settings. Topics will include the study of art and art education, curriculum development, traditional and emerging art media and methods, classroom management and student discipline. Emphasis will be on the study of two-dimensional art. One-hour discussion; four hours of studio.
CHEM 333R – Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry I (1)
Course deleted.
COMS 321 – Rhetorical Discourse (3)
Requisites removed (formerly COMS 151/L or COMS 225/L).
CTVA 305 – History of Broadcasting (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 230 or CTVA 240 or CTVA 250.
CTVA 310 – History of American Cinema (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower division writing requirement and CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 315 – New Directions in Electronic Media Systems (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210.
CTVA 319 – Criticism in Cinema and Television Arts (3)
Prerequisites: CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 320 – Writing for Film and Television (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 220
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250
CTVA 330 – Advanced Audio Production (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 230.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 230.
CTVA 340 – Advanced Video Production and Editing (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 240
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240
CTVA 342 – Digital Cinematography (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 240 or 357
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 355 (for film production option); grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for television production option).
CTVA 350 – Film Directing (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 250
Change to:
Prerequisite: Film Portfolio acceptance (for film production option); grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 250 (for screenwriting option).
CTVA 352 – Nonlinear Digital Editing (3)
Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CTVA 341 or 355
Change to:
Prerequisite: Film Portfolio acceptance (for film production option); grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for television production option).
CTVA 355 – Intermediate Film Production (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 250.
Change to:
Prerequisite: Film Portfolio acceptance.
CTVA 358 – Advanced Film Sound (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 355
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 355 (for film production option); grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for television production option).
CTVA 361 – Computing for Multimedia (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 230 or CTVA 240 or CTVA 250.
CTVA 362 – Corporate and Instructional Media (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 230 or CTVA 240 or CTVA 250.
CTVA 384 – Electronic Media Advertising (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 400 – Media and Society (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210.
CTVA 401 – Mass Communications Research (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210.
CTVA 405 – International Broadcasting (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 410 – Advanced Film Theory: Studies in Film Style (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower division writing requirement, CTVA
210 or 310.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 412 – Analysis of Classic Film Makers (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower division writing requirement, CTVA 210 or 310.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 413 – Women as Filmmakers (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower division writing requirement, CTVA 210 or 310.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 415A-Z – International Cinema (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the lower division writing requirement; CTVA 210 or 310
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 416 – The Documentary Tradition in Film and Video (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 210.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210.
CTVA 421 – Writing the Short Film (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 220 and either 320 (for writing option) or 355 (for film option) and instructor consent.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 320 and instructor consent (for screenwriting option); grade of C or higher in CTVA 355 and instructor consent (for film production option).
CTVA 440 – Theory and Techniques of TV Directing (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 240.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, CTVA 240 (for television production option); grade of C or higher in CTVA 320 (for screenwriting option).
CTVA 452 – Senior Film Project (3)
Prerequisites: CTVA 356 or 357 or 358 and Senior-status.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 355 and the following: CTVA 356 or CTVA 357, or both CTVA 358 and CTVA 359, and Senior Status.
CTVA 467 – The Management of Post Production for Television and Film (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 468 – Multimedia Production (3)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 361.
CTVA 475 – Audience Analysis (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 480 – Electronic Media Management (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 481 – Network Practices (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 482 – Network Program Development (3)
Prerequisites: CTVA 100.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 487 – Social Controls and Regulation of Electronic Media (3)
Prerequisite: CTVA 100
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 305.
CTVA 495A-Z – Current Trends in Television and Film (3)
Prerequisites: CTVA Major; completion of core requirements in option.
Change to:
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; lower division writing requirement.
CTVA 692 – Thesis Script Preparation (3)
Change course title (formerly Research Practicum). Prerequisite changed to CTVA 525 (formerly CTVA 501 and 602). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: CTVA 525. Instruction in the steps of thesis publication and individual guidance in developing original story ideas into full outlines for thesis screenplays. The first act of a feature-length thesis script is also written as preparation for final thesis completion and publication in CTVA 698C. This is a product-oriented course.
ECE 240 – Electrical Engineering Fundamentals (3)
Prerequisites changed to PHYS 220B/L and Math 250. Co-requisite: Math 280 or ECE 280. Recommended Co-requisite: ECE 240L (formerly PHYS 220B/L and Math 250. Recommended Co-requisite: ECE 240L and MATH 280.)
ECON 401 – Macroeconomic Theory (3)
Change prerequisites to ECON 309, ECON 310 with C or better, ECON 311. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 309, ECON 310, and ECON 311. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher.)
ECON 405 – International Economics (3)
Change prerequisites to ECON 309, ECON 310 with C or better, ECON 311. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 309, ECON 310, and ECON 311. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher.)
ECON 409 – Introduction to Econometrics (3)
Change prerequisites to ECON 309 and ECON 310 with a C or better. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 309 and ECON 310. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) of 8 or higher.)
ECON 410 – Industrial Organization (3)
Prerequisite changed to ECON 310 with C or better. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 310, Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher).
ECON 411 – The Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3)
Prerequisite changed to ECON 310 with a C or better. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 310, Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher).
ECON 412 – Seminar in Economic Thought (3)
Prerequisite changed to ECON 310 with a C or better. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 310, Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher.)
ECON 433 – Public Economics (3)
Prerequisite changed to ECON 309 and ECON 310 with a C or better. Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher (formerly ECON 309 and ECON 310, Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) Score of 8 or higher.)
E ED 698 – Thesis/Graduate Project (3)
Change prerequisites to Graduate standing and completion of E ED 610 Research in Elementary Education (formerly Acceptance by a Thesis Committee assigned by the Department). Change in repeat limit to 2 opportunities for a maximum of 6 units.
EPC 314 – Psychological Foundations, K-12 (3)
New course description as follows: This course should be taken only by students NOT intending to enroll in a K-12 teacher preparation program. The study of the theory and research of educational psychology is basic to successfully working with preK – adult students of all backgrounds, and needs. The course addresses the implications of a variety of factors on the learning and teaching process, including: motivation, development (cognitive, language, socio-emotional, physical, and moral), cognition, assessment, behavior management, and differentiating individual and group instruction in light of differences in language, ability, ethnicity, social class, gender, exceptionality, and family pattern. Students are required to spend a minimum of 10 hours with a maximum of 20 hours participating and/or observing in an approved setting.
EPC 315 – Psychological Foundations of Learning & Teaching (3)
New course description as follows: This course should be taken only by students intending to enroll in a K-12 teacher preparation program. In this course students will study educational psychology theories and research regarding how people learn and implications for teaching. The principles of educational psychology form a foundation of knowledge about teaching which is built upon in subsequent courses in teaching methods and practice teaching. Topics studied include learning, motivation, development (cognitive, language, socio-emotional, physical and moral) and their relationship to learning and instruction, cognition, assessment, classroom management, and individual and group differences in learning. Implications for teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, as well as students with special needs, are considered throughout the course. Students begin to develop a professional portfolio which course, students are required to spend a minimum of 20 hours participating and/or observing in public schools. The integration of coursework and field work provides students the opportunity to complete various assignments in preparation for meeting Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE).
FCS 113 – Drafting for Interior Design
Prerequisites changed to Recommended Corequisites: ART 124A, ART 141 (formerly Prerequisites: ART 124A, ART 141).
FCS 211 – Interior Design (3)
Change prerequisites to FCS 113 and FCS 114/L (formerly FCS 114, FCS 170, ART 113 or FCS 113.)
FCS 214 – Interior Design Materials, Standards, and Specifications (2)
Change prerequisites to FCS 113, FCS 114/L; Corequisite: FCS 160 and FCS 214L (formerly FCS 114/L, ART 113 or FCS 113, FCS 160, and FCS 170; Corequisite: FCS 214L).
FCS 210 – History of Interiors and Architecture I (3)
Change course abbreviation (formerly FCS 310). Change prerequisites to FCS 113, FCS 114/L (formerly FCS 211).
FCS 311 – Interior Design II (3)
Change prerequisites to FCS 211, FCS 213/L, FCS 214/L, ART 124A, ART 141, ART 230; Corequisite: FCS 314/L (formerly FCS 211, FCS 213/L, FCS 214/L, ART 230).
FCS 312 – Lighting and Mechanical Systems (3)
Change prerequisites to FCS 211, FCS 213/L, and FCS 214/L; Corequisite: FCS 312L (formerly FCS 211, FCS 213/L, FCS 214/L, and ART 230; Corequisite: FCS 312L).
FCS 316 – Presentation Techniques for Interior Design (3)
Change prerequisites to FCS 113, FCS 114/L, ART 124A, ART 141, and ART 230 (formerly FCS 211, FCS 213/L, FCS 214/L, and ART 230).
FCS 410 – History of Interiors and Architecture II (3)
Change prerequisites to FCS 210, FCS 311, ART 315 (formerly FCS 311, and ART 112 or ART 315).
FCS 412 – Organization of Interior Design Practice (3)
Change prerequisites to FCS 311, FCS 314/L, FCS 316 (formerly FCS 310, FCS 311, FCS 312/L, FCS 314/L, FCS 316).
GEOL 307/L – Petrology & Lab (3/1)
Change lecture prerequisites to GEOL 207, corequisite GEOL 307L (formerly Corequisite: 307L. Preparatory: GEOL 207/L). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: GEOL 207/L. Corequisite: 307L. Introduction to the classification and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks, including the optical properties of minerals. Lab study of these rocks utilizes hand-specimen characteristics and the petrographic microscope. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours, field trips.
LING 404 – Syntax (3)
Change course title (formerly LING 404 – Morphology and Syntax). Prerequisites changed to recommended preparatory: LING 300 (formerly ANTH 310, ENGL 301, COMS 420). New course description as follows: Preparatory: LING 300. LING 404 takes students into the field of syntactic inquiry, learning about the tools used to develop representations of what speakers of a language know about the structural relationships among the meaning-bearing elements in their language, and about how such representations are evaluated, in pursuit of the representations telling us the most about human language itself. Available for Graduate Credit.
LING 411 – Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3)
Change course title (formerly ENGL 611 – Seminar in Historical Linguistics). Prerequisites deleted (formerly ENGL 301 or equivalent, or 400 or 405.) New course description as follows: LING 411 investigates the ways languages emerge and evolve. The course looks at gradual changes in vocabulary (lexicon), sounds (phonetics and phonology—hence, spelling), and grammar (morphology and syntax). Topics include the comparative method, the genealogical and typological classification of languages, language universals and the historical development of entirely “new” language varieties and language families. Much attention is devoted to how Present-day Englishes have developed from Old Anglo Saxon. Available for Graduate Credit.
ME 697 – Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
Change unit value to 3 units (formerly [1/3]). Change prerequisites to classified status in the MSME program. Addition to course description as follows: Prerequisite: Classified status in the MSME program. Registration is by permission number only through the ME Graduate Coordinator.
ME 698 – Directed Comprehensive Studies (1-6)
Change prerequisites to classified status in the MSME program. Addition to course description as follows: Prerequisite: Classified status in the MSME program. Registration is by permission number only through the thesis committee chairperson.
MSE 604 – Engineering Economy and Financial Analysis (3)
Change course title (formerly Economic Analysis of Engineering). New course description as follows: Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Evaluation of economic feasibility from an engineering perspective. Application of various methods of comparing alternatives on an economic basis. Implications of depreciation, inflation, currency exchange rates and taxation on the profitability of engineering projects. Reviewing the basics of cost estimation and accounting. Development of income statement, cash flow statement and balance sheet for engineering projects. Other applications in corporate financial decision making are briefly covered.
MSE 606A – Engineering Operations Management (3)
Change course title (formerly Engineering Operations Research I). New course description as follows: Systems methodology and mathematical bases in industry and service organizations. Selected approaches in optimization methods, such as linear programming and multi-criteria decision making tools; inventory modeling; logistics; decision analysis as well as PERT/CPM methods. Emphasis will be placed on applying the tools and the economic interpretation of results.
MUS 432/L – Master Class: Piano and Lab (1/1)
Change in repeat limit to 2 opportunities, maximum of 4 units.
PAS 100 – Introduction to Black Studies and Culture (3)
Change course title (formerly Introduction to Black Culture). New course description as follows: Overview of Black culture, including history, religion, social organization, politics, economics, psychology, and creative production, with a survey of the key concepts and fundamental literature in each area. The discipline of Pan African Studies is also presented in terms of its origins and distinguishing theories and methods. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
PHIL 310 – Philosophical Problems (3)
New course description as follows: Introduction for upper division students to such central philosophic problems as knowledge, truth, reality and mind. Regular written assignments will be required.
POLS 490CA – Supervised Individual Project, California Government (1)
Change course type to non-traditional instruction, examination or evaluation (formerly independent study, field work, studio instruction, or supervised activity).
PSY 492H – Honors Professional Development (1)
Change course title (formerly PSY 492SOC – Professional Development in the Social Sciences I). Change course type to Seminar, methods of instruction (formerly Education Workshop and Social Science Activity). Change prerequisiests to Restricted. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended Preparation: PSY 301 (formerly Prerequisites: PSY 250; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended Preparation: PSY 301). Change basis of grading to Credit/No Credit Only (formerly CR/NC or Letter Grade).
SPED 682D – Advanced Clinical Practicum in Special Education (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 682EC – Advanced Clinical Practicum in Special Education (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 682MM – Advanced Clinical Practicum in Special Education (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 682MS – Advanced Clinical Practicum in Special Education (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 697 – Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 698C – Thesis or Graduate Project (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 699X – Independent Study (1)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 698Y – Independent Study (2)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).
SPED 698Z – Independent Study (3)
Change course type to independent study, studio instruction or supervised activities (formerly practice teaching, workstudy, thesis project and independent study).

PROGRAM MODIFICATIONS

BIOL BA & BIOL BS Options I – V
Change in program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: CHEM 333 – Principles of Organic Chemistry is adding a 1-unit recitation to lecture.
CTVA – Electronic Media Management Minor
Change program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: eliminated CTVA 494C, the Internship course, and CTVA 482, Network Program Development, from the menu of elective upper-division courses for the Electronic Media Management Minor, from which students must select three courses. We propose adding a course to the same menu, CTVA 405, International Broadcasting.
ART – Art Education Option
Following adjustments made: Four of the required art education courses for the Single Subject Matter Program in Art Education will be modified based on course content, sequencing and programmatic issues. The current 13 unit requirement will be changed to 12 units required.
MUS – BM Keyboard Option
Change program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: This modification clarifies the curricular differences between the emphases in piano performance and piano pedagogy and adjusts several courses in each. For both emphases this modification adds one course (MUS 232C) to the keyboard skills courses, expands the study of keyboard literature from one course to two (MUS 407A and MUS 407B), and requires Keyboard Master Class (MUS 432/L) to be repeated. In addition, for piano pedagogy majors, the required advanced pedagogy class (MUS 478, taken twice) has been split into two courses (MUS 478A/L and MUS 478B/L, each taken once). To make these changes without altering the total units to the program, the ensemble requirements have been slightly reduced and the courses to be taken for that requirement have been clarified.
MUS – Master of Music, Collaborative Keyboard Performance
Following adjustments made: This option will have the same core requirements as our existing options in the Master of Music program. We have proposed a separate program modification for the Master of Music program to address requirements of our accrediting agency (NASM: National Association of Schools of Music) from our recent re-accreditation.
MUS – Master of Music, Options in Performance, Conducting, and Composition
Following adjustments made: The primary change to our graduate core is the reduction of the music history requirement by 3 units to make way for a 3-unit pedagogy course to be included in each of the areas of concentration. We are also adding a “Selected Topics in Music History” course to broaden the possible offerings in that area. In the individual concentrations, we are adding an individual lessons course in composition as indicated by our accreditation review, graduate piano pedagogy courses to meet the pedagogy requirements in that concentration, and a graduate piano masterclass to bolster the performance requirements in that concentration.
FIN – Finance Minor
Increase units to 21 units (formerly 18 units).  Following adjustments made: the number of required finance elective courses would increase from one to two.
Engineering Management

Modified Program requirements for the Requirements for the Master of Science in Engineering Management

Requirements for the Master of Science in Engineering Management

Taught by faculty with professional engineering management experience, the Engineering Management program offers engineers and other technical professionals the opportunity to develop technical management and entrepreneurial skills pertinent to the management of existing and emerging technologies. The program stresses the devel–opment of technological decision-making abilities, while also enabling continued intellectual growth in an area that meets professional needs. Engineering Management program graduates have been assuming leadership roles in industry since the early 1970s.

Program Goals

The goals of the Master of Science in Engineering Management pro–gram are to provide opportunities for:

  • the development of technical management decision-making abilities;
  • the acquisition of knowledge about the management of existing and emerging technologies;
  • the development of technical professional employee management skills;
  • the acquisition of knowledge of engineering cost, financial, and eco–nomical analysis, and
  • continued intellectual growth in a discipline-related area.

A.    Requirements for Admission to the Program:

1. Satisfaction of all requirements for graduate admission to the University.

2. Approval by the Department Graduate Coordinator.

B.     Requirements for Advancement to Classified Status:

1. Satisfaction of University requirements for classified status.

2. Approval of program of study plan by assigned faculty advisor.

3. Approval by the Department Graduate Coordinator.

C.    Special Requirements:

1. This program is intended primarily for students holding a B.S. in Engineering or other technical field. Prospective students who work in technical environments and hold degrees in non-technical fields should contact the Department in order to discuss additional pre–requisite courses with a faculty advisor.

2. Students entering the program are expected to have completed Engineering Management (MSE 504) or equivalent. Admitted stu–dents who have not completed such a course as part of an under–graduate program may complete the course as part of their graduate degree program of study.

Required Courses

1. Required Core Courses (15 units):

MSE 601A Engineering Statistics I (3)

MSE 602 Advanced Engineering Management (3)

MSE 604 Engineering Economy and Financial Analysis (3)

MSE 606A Engineering Operations Management (3)

MSE 608B Management of Engineering Professionals (3)

2. Culminating Experience (3 units):

MSE 697MGT Engineering Management Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

English – Subject Matter Option – Linguistics & Diversity Extended Study
Change program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: The proposed changes to the Linguistics and Diversity Extended Study for the English Subject Matter Option increase the courses available to students, removing the problem of the current configuration’s infrequently offered courses. The changes also make available new and relevant courses.
Jewish Studies
Change Minor Program RequirementsChange program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: Incorporate new courses in the minor and eliminate the required Independent Study course.
Liberal Studies Program – BA, Change Program Requirements
Decrease total units in program from 108 to 107. Following adjustments made: aligns the Liberal Studies teacher preparation curriculum closely with subject matter as it is taught in K-6 classrooms. Students will choose one of five specializations: Arts, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Science. Each specialization includes a capstone course. This will allow for much improved program assessment. Students will take 12 units of mathematics an increase from the current 7 units.Liberal Studies Program – Integrated Teacher Education Program, Freshman OptionChange program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: aligns the Liberal Studies teacher preparation curriculum closely with subject matter as it is taught in K-6 classrooms. Students will choose one of five specializations: Arts, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Science. Each specialization includes a capstone course. This will allow for much improved program assessment. Students will take 12 units of mathematics an increase from the current 7 units.Liberal Studies Program – Integrated Teacher Education Program, Jr. OptionIncrease total units in program from 130 to 134. Following adjustments made: aligns the Liberal Studies teacher preparation curriculum closely with subject matter as it is taught in K-6 classrooms. Students will choose one of five specializations: Arts, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Science. Each specialization includes a capstone course. This will allow for much improved program assessment. Students will take 12 units of mathematics an increase from the current 7 units.Linguistics – Linguistics/TESL, Change Program RequirementsChange program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: The Linguistics/TESL Program has added eight new undergraduate linguistics courses in the past three years. We have redesigned the undergraduate major to include these courses to give our students a more solid background in core areas of the field.PHIL Minor – Correct Typographical Error in Catalog DescriptionFollowing adjustments made: There is a typo in the current catalog regarding the electives requirements for minoring in philosophy. The current catalog copy says that “Electives (9 Units) Choose three additional philosophy courses (9 units) other than PHIL 499, at least three of which are upper division courses.” We request it to be changed to “Electives (9 Units) Choose three additional philosophy courses (9 units) other than PHIL 499, at least two of which are upper division courses.”PHIL Major – Change Program RequirementsChange program requirements with no change in total units. Following adjustments made: The philosophy department requests the following changes in requirements for majors in order to better serve our majors: including PHIL 200 as an alternative to satisfy the logic requirement; adopting a diversity requirement for the majors, and modifying the elective units in correspondence with this change.
FCS Interior Design Option
Change Program RequirementsChange program requirements with no change in total units. Change prerequisites to multiple courses in program. Following adjustments made:
1. ART course changes:
a. Remove ART 112 as an alternate to ART 315;
b. Remove ART 113 as an alternate to FCS 1132. Interior Design course changes:
a. FCS 113: Change ART 124A and ART 141 to recommended corequisites;
b. FCS 211: Remove FCS 170 as a prerequisite;
c. FCS 214/L: Remove FCS 170 as a prerequisite. Change FCS 160 to a corequisite;
d. FCS 310: Change course to FCS 210. Remove FCS 211 as a prerequisite. Add FCS 113 and FCS 114/L as prerequisites;
e. FCS 311: Add FCS 314/L as a corequisite and ART 124A and ART 141 as prerequisites;
f. FCS 312/L: Remove ART 230 as a prerequisite;
g. FCS 316: Add ART 124A, ART 141, FCS 113 and FCS 114/L as prerequisites, Remove FCS 211, FCS 213/L, FCS 214/L as prerequisites;
h. FCS 410: Add FCS 210 as a prerequisite;
i. FCS 412: Remove FCS 310 and FCS 312/L as prerequisitesFCS – Family Studies OptionChange program requirements with no change in total units. Change name of Family Studies Pattern A to Childcare and Administration (formerly Childcare Administration). Following adjustments made: The following changes are proposed:1. Changing the name of the Family Studies Pattern A from Childcare Administration to Childcare and Administration.2. Removing the following two courses as electives from Family Studies Pattern A:
• KIN 370/L Physical Education in Early Childhood and Education Lab and
• KIN 470/L Physical Education for Children and Lab3. Adding the following eight courses as possible electives for Family Studies Pattern A:
• AAS 450: Asian American Child and the Schools
• CD 361: Language Development in Children
• CADV 452: Child Advocacy
• CHS 430: The Chicana/o Child
• CHS 416: Children’s Songs and Games
• PAS 420: The Black Child
• SOC 328: The Child and Society
• SPED 400 Developmental Differences and Implications in Special Education.4. Changing the number of units for electives from 3-4 units to 6 units.Radiologic ScienceChange total units to Degree from 123 to 126. Change GE Requirement (count HSCI 384 and 486B for Lifelong Learning).GEOGAdd new courses to selections for Major Options and GIS Minor, no change in unit count. Following adjustments made: Add five new applications courses to the selection list for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Geography for Major Options 1 and 2, plus the GIS Option in the Minor.PASChange from 4 to 3 Options in major, rename Options, change core requirements, incorporate new courses, plus other changes; no change in units, implementation Fall 2013.PSY – Honors OptionNew option in undergraduate major. Following adustments made: The program would function completely within our existing major:
1) honors students will enroll in honors sections of existing courses (PSY 321/L-Research Methods in Psychology and Lab and capstone seminars), with the honors sections being embedded within the non-honors sections. That is, a single class may be made up of some students who are enrolled in the non-honors section (PSY 321/L) and some (about 5 students per section) who are enrolled in the honors section (PSY 321H/L). The honors students would complete all of the same assignments as the non-honors students as well as additional honors assignments (see attached sample syllabi for PSY 321H/L and honors capstone).
2) honors students will also enroll in graduate-level (500-level) courses which are already offered by the department.
3) honors students will also enroll in an Honors Professional Development seminar (PSY 492H) which is already offered in our department for our current honors program and for other advanced students.

SPAN – M.A. in Spanish

Program description and requirements changed.

NEW COURSES

ART 219 – Art in Los Angeles (3)
Introduction to the principles and skills relating to Art History based on study and analysis of museums, galleries and other art exhibitions in the Los Angeles area. Class visits to off-campus sites alternate with in-class seminars for review and discussion of content studies on field trips.
ART 307 – Core Art Studio (3)
This course is an introduction to upper division art department concentrations, goals, and expectations. The focus is on studio exploration of technology in art and its relationship to contemporary art practice and theory. 6 hours lab.
ART 309 – Video for Visual Artists (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing. Explores the relationship between visual art and video/moving images. Students create short video explorations to study the camera, movement, composition, color, and editing. 6 hours lab.
ART 337D – Printmaking II: Relief (3)
ART 337D. Printmaking II: Relief. Prerequisites: ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200. Contemporary relief methods on linoleum, wood, and other related material, with black/white and color printing, and exploration of cross-media approaches. Projects emphasize problem solving through self-directed form and content in the creation of portfolio-quality work. 6 hours lab.
ART 345 – Entertainment Advertising Design (3)
Prerequisite: ART 344. Preparatory: ART 343. This course concentrates on the theory and practice of advertising design for the entertainment industry. Students are expected to develop a combination of graphic design, illustration, concept development and branding skills for the purposes of promoting motion pictures and television through a wide variety of media (posters, print ads, billboards, web banners, and other branding elements). Utilizing industry standard software, the course also includes historical and contemporary references, as well as theoretical and conceptual approaches. Non-majors may take this course for Credit/No Credit. 6 hours lab.
ART 405 – Advanced Web Design (3)
Prerequisites: Art 301; Recommended Preparatory: Art 354. Advanced techniques in web design. This course covers advanced techniques in current computer web applications, interaction/motion web design and programming tools. 6 hours lab.
MUS 232C – Advanced Keyboard Skills (1)
Pre-requisite: MUS 132B. The emphasis in this course is on advanced skills needed by keyboard majors for accompanying and sightreading, including score reading, improvisation, harmonization, figured bass, and transposition. Two hours lab per week.
MUS 407A – Keyboard Literature I (2)
Pre-requisites: MUS 201, MUS 202. This class is designed to study the history and literature for keyboard instruments (early keyboards up to fortepiano) from the Middle Ages and Renaissance through the Classical era, with an emphasis on evolving styles and forms, such as the simple keyboard forms of the Renaissance written for the early instruments with the increasingly complex polyphonic structures of the Baroque and Classical eras. Available for Graduate credit.
MUS 407B – Keyboard Literature II (2)
Pre-requisites: MUS 201, MUS 202. This class is designed to study the history and literature for keyboard instruments (fortepiano and piano) from the Romantic era to the present, with an emphasis on evolving styles and forms, such as the national schools of the 19th century and some defining theoretical trends of the 20th. Available for Graduate credit.
MUS 478A/L – Piano Pedagogy Resources and Practicum & Lab (1/1)
Pre-requisite: MUS 461B/L. Study and analysis of intermediate and advanced piano literature, business procedures, and pedagogical and technological aids for the piano teacher. Application of literature, teaching aids and software in supervised and individual and group teaching situations, in a wide variety of settings and at various levels of advancement. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.
MUS 478B/L – Directed Teaching in Piano Pedagogy & Lab (1/1)
Pre-requisite: MUS 478A/L. Application of literature, teaching aids and software in supervised group teaching situations, in a wide variety of class piano settings and at various levels of advancement. Study and analysis of piano literature, pedagogical and technological aids for the piano teacher for use in group settings. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.
AIS 333 – American Indian Philosophy (3)
A survey of American Indian philosophy from issues arising out of Oral Traditions, to early colonial Indigenous impacts on American Democracy and Pragmatism, to recent work on knowledge, value, and being as well as applied issues such as tribal sovereignty and the environment
Liberal Studies Program – LRS 451, Language Arts Capstone (3)
Students in LRS 451, the capstone course in the Language Arts concentration, will immerse themselves in a variety of texts, explicitly connecting the language and structures of these to their meanings, purposes and audiences, and practicing both how to discuss such phenomena and to use them to craft their own texts. Important will be the triangular focus on the language, purpose, and discourse community of considered texts and how these feature categories both define texts and help us understand, craft, and teach them. This course is designed for Multiple Subject Credential Students only.
Liberal Studies Program – LRS 452, Mathematics Capstone (3)
The capstone course will integrate problems from arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and probability and statistics content areas for students in the mathematics specialization. Through their own problem solving and case studies and video episodes of children working on mathematics problems relating to the four content areas, LRS students will connect their own understanding of mathematics with those of K-6 children’s mathematical thinking. Students will study the mathematical issues involved in how K-6 pupils understand mathematics. Students will read, discuss and write about selected research articles addressing problem solving and connections to learning in elementary classrooms. This course is intended for Multiple Subject Credential students only. Not available for credit towards a mathematics major or minor.
Liberal Arts Program – LRS 454, Social Science A, Places, Cultures, Histories (3)
The capstone course will utilize historical and various social-science disciplines in an extensive case study of a single topic or theme, such as civil rights. By focusing on a single topic or theme from a multiplicity of disciplinary perspectives, students will more deeply grasp how the methods and techniques of each discipline construct knowledge in specific ways. Students will also focus on the relations among different disciplines and the value of integrating their perspectives. LRS students will critique social-science lecture presentations by CSUN faculty, and will develop and model social-science lessons to be critiqued by their peers. This course is designed for Liberal Studies Multiple Subject Credential or Education Specialist students only.
Liberal Studies Program – LRS 455, Social Science B, Diverse Communities Capstone (3)
Students explore and practice the design, development, and implementation of K-6 Social Studies programs that incorporate and reflect community diversity, history-social studies skills and content, and social justice themes. Students examine in depth how pedagogy and content may be used to support their future students’ social consciousness about history-social science and their roles as active participants in society. Students engage in activities that connect history to present day social issues and require them to employ historical documents and narrative artifacts, as well as critically examine current social justice issues. Course requires 15 hours fieldwork in diverse communities. This course is intended for Multiple Subject Credential students only.
Liberal Studies Program – LRS 456, Science Capstone (3)
The capstone course will emphasize concepts from the physical science, earth science and life science content areas with an emphasis on scientific investigation and problem solving. Students will integrate crosscutting themes across the sciences such as patterns, cause and effect, scale, energy and matter flow, structure and function, and stability and change. Students will design and carry out scientific investigation projects that allow them to apply their knowledge of scientific practice and scientific concepts. LRS students will connect their own understanding of the sciences with the conceptual understanding of K-6 children. Students will read, discuss, and write about selected research articles assessing problem solving and connections to learning science in elementary classrooms. This course is intended for Multiple Subject Credential students only.
Liberal Studies Program – LRS 457, Arts Integration and Inquiry Capstone (3)
This capstone course will engage students in the understanding and practice of how the arts can be used in co-equal integration across the multiple disciplines of the K-6 curriculum to connect knowledge and enhance Language Arts literacy.
LING 403 – Introduction to Morphology (3)
The focus for students in this Morphology course is both to understand the range of questions that the field of linguistics asks about speakers’ knowledge of word structure in any language and how this knowledge relates both to phonology and to syntax, and begin to apply the methods used to find and understand the answers. Available for Graduate Credit.
PHIL 170 – Philosophy and Popular Culture (3)
In this course, students will examine philosophical themes within popular culture, and will use philosophy to investigate how they relate to popular culture. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities.)
PHIL 180 – Human Nature and the Meaning of Life (3)
Examines a variety of theories of human nature. Students in the course will discuss how those theories answer questions like: “What are we? Why are we here; what is the meaning of life?” Students in the course will come to understand these theories, learn to critically examine them, and try to determine what implications the theories have for our conception of ourselves and for our conception of a good or happy or meaningful life.
PHIL 225 – Evolutionary Reasoning (3)
This course introduces basic concepts and skills of critical reasoning and scientific reasoning in the context of reasoning about evolution. These include argument identification, argument analysis, and argument evaluation. Key ideas in evolutionary thinking are also introduced. This course emphasizes the attainment of skills applied in evolutionary reasoning.
PHIL 333 – American Indian Philosophy (3)
A survey of American Indian philosophy from issues arising out of Oral Traditions, to early colonial Indigenous impacts on American Democracy and Pragmatism, to recent work on knowledge, value, and being as well as applied issues such as sovereignty and the environment.
RS 346 – Sufism (3)
A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
FCS 453/L – Fashion Promotion and Visual Merchandising (2/1)
Prerequisites: FCS 255 or Graduate Standing. Corequisites FCS453/L. Study of principles in fashion promotion and visual presentation for commercial purposes. Lab involves fashion retail store analysis and window display projects for applications of the principles. Two hours lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Available for graduate credit.
RTM 306 – Leadership Coaching (3)
A basic foundation for understanding and practicing coaching methodology for leadership development. Content includes core coaching competencies and principles, the coaching conversation model, ethics and standards, application of skills necessary for one-to-one coaching to produce positive change in leaders. Recommended preparatory course RTM 302.
GEOG 408C/L – Geospatial Project Management/Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Geography 206/L or permission of instructor. This course exposes students to ideas and concepts in geospatial project management by covering concepts in system organization, design and analysis, as well as the interpersonal factors which influence professional interaction and that are specific and unique to projects in geospatial science and technology. Students will learn to think through issues of geospatial project scope, needs, work structure and timeline, budget, project stakeholder roles and responsibilities, quality control, risk, final plan documentation, and implementation. Available for graduate credit. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
GEOG 408D/L – Spatial Database Management/Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Geography 206/L or permission of instructor. Advanced concepts in spatial database management. This course explores the management and design of spatial datasets and their association with Geographical Information Systems. Students will be introduced to concepts such as the principles of spatial database planning, design, implementation, and administration. Final projects will result in the development of a customized geospatial database. Available for graduate credit. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
GEOG 408E/L – GIS Automation and Customization/Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Geography 306/L or permission of instructor. This course exposes students to GIS automation using industry standard programming systems. Basic programming concepts and methodologies for customizing and/or extending the available functions in ArcGIS are introduced. Available for graduate credit. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory.
GEOG 408F/L – WebGIS/Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Geography 206/L or permission of instructor. Introduction to the design, development, and implementation of interactive and accessible customized web-based GIS applications. The course provides an overview of conceptual and theoretical backgrounds of WebGIS system architecture and offers programming concepts and skill sets underlying development and implementation of distributed geographical information on the Internet. Available for graduate credit. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
GEOG 408G/L – GIS and Decision-Making/Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Geography 306/L or permission of instructor. Introduction to the principles of integrating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial decision analysis methodologies with examples drawn from public and private sector organizations using a collaborative approach. The course focuses on multiple criteria evaluation techniques and their integration with GIS, and also introduces optimization methods capable of solving geospatial decision problems including linear programming and multiple objectives optimization. Available for graduate credit. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
PAS 168 – Introduction to the African Diaspora (3)
Students will explore a variety of historical, theoretical, and cultural approaches to studying the African Diaspora. The assigned readings cover both the geographic and conceptual nature of the African Diaspora beginning on the African continent, moving through the Americas (North, South, and the Caribbean basin), and into Europe. It considers important issues in the construction of the African Diaspora, such as the formation of racial identities and social movements, the circulation of ideas and intellectuals, and the manner in which the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, location, language, and power influence how groups and individuals experience diaspora.
PAS 252 – Popular Culture and the Black World (3)
This course examines popular culture as it relates to the cultural transmission, inheritance, and complex relations between African origins and the irreversible scatterings of the Black disapora. Specifically, we will examine the role of media and the arts in enabling, facilitating, or challenging the social constructions of “Blackness” in Black popular culture. The course will survey the products of popular culture in the Black world as signifiers of larger cultural forces and realities.
PAS 488 – Sustainability and Environmental Justice in African and African Diaspora Communities (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. Examines sustainability from a Black perspective by exploring the challenges and prospects for sustainable development in African, African-American and other African Diaspora communities. Review of environmental degradation, restoration, preservation and conservation in selected Black communities, linkages among poverty, land tenure, environmental damage and racism as they affect Blacks. Particular attention will be given to African and African-American responses to environmental hazards. Available for graduate credit.
PAS 490 – Statistical Research and Methods in Pan African Studies.
Prerequisite: PAS 398. Introduction to data analysis and research on the Pan African community. The course covers descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, categorical and continuous variables, probability theory, sampling, statistical inference, and regression. The course introduces a statistical software package and will involve data analysis exercises.
ME 431/L – Machine Design and Manufacturing (2/1)
An advanced mechanical design course with emphasis on computer aided design and design for manufacturing of machine parts. Introduction to machine elements. Metal machining theory, operation, and tool technology. Non-traditional machining and surface treatment. Working drawings, tolerancing, and limits of fit. Fixture design and planning. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
PAS 398 – Research Methods and Paradigms in Pan African Studies (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. Introduction to paradigms, theories, and models of research on the Pan African community. Emphasis will be placed on methodological, epistemological and ethical concerns related to conducting research studies on people of African descent. Other topics include sampling techniques, experimental and non-experimental designs, ethnography, and archival approaches relevant to the Pan African community.

SELECTED TOPICS

JOUR 495 SLT – Spanish Language Television
Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 or 315. Advanced research, writing and reporting of selected journalistic styles and/or subject matter. Ethical issues, problems, traditional techniques and technological approaches are integral segments of each selected topic. Subject content will change from semester to semester.
JOUR 495 LF – Long Form Journalism (3)
Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 or 315. Advanced research, writing and reporting of selected journalistic styles and/or subject matter. Ethical issues, problems, traditional techniques and technological approaches are integral segments of each selected topic. Subject content will change from semester to semester.
AAS 495KA Directed Research in the Contemporary Korean American Community (3)
Preparatory: AAS 100 or 210 or instructor consent. Intensive study of selected themes and issues in Asian American Studies. Topics change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with instructor consent.
CADV 497AA – The Affordable Child (3)
Recommended Preparatory: CADV 350, 352, 380/L. Innovative courses of study. Topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Different topics may be taken for credit.
CADV 497AB – Issues in Emerging Adulthood (3)
Recommended Preparatory: CADV 350, 352, 380/L. Innovative courses of study. Topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Different topics may be taken for credit.