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Computer Science

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Overview

Programs

Undergraduate:

Graduate:

The Majors

Computing technology has an impact on almost every aspect of daily life. Computer applications abound in art, business, entertainment, science, engineering and medicine. For students who think logically, enjoy solving problems and have an interest in software development, Computer Science is a good study choice.

Students develop skills in logical thinking, creative problem solv- ing and communication. Classes often incorporate a team approach, requiring clear communication among members as they solve a prob- lem and explain their solution to others.

Students gain both hands-on design experience and theoretical knowledge. This combination of skills provides an advantage to gradu- ating students because of the broad range of skills possessed.

Computer Science focuses on the designing and building of soft- ware to create efficient solutions to real-world problems in such fields as robotics, networking, graphics, software engineering and security. Students frequently specialize in more than one of these fields.

Computer Information Technology is designed for students inter- ested in professional careers involving the design of solutions to informational technology infrastructure needs for companies and organizations. Graduates of the CIT program will have an applied knowledge of such fields as web programming, system infrastructure, databases, networking, e-business, project management, data center management, security and information assurance.

Classes are generally small, with lab sessions averaging less than 25 students. Students work alongside faculty in Department labs equipped with state-of-the-art computing equipment.

Students can gain extra experience in the Student Chapter of the ACM (affiliated with the national organization), which hosts techni- cal and social activities, as well as the Honors Co-op Program, which provides paid internships during the senior year at local companies.

Academic Advisement

Contact the Department Office regarding undergraduate advisement. Graduate students are initially advised by the Graduate Coordinator. After the formation of their Graduate Committees, graduate students are advised by the Committee Chair.

Educational Objectives for the Undergraduate Programs in ComputerScience

Three to five years after successfully completing the computer science program, graduates will have demonstrated the ability to:

  1. 1. Solve computing problems as necessary in a professional workplace environment or in the pursuit of an advanced degree.
  2. 2. Apply current industry-accepted computing practices and new and emerging technologies in the analysis, design, implementation and verification of high-quality computer-based systems to meet organizational needs.
  3. 3. Work collaboratively as team members and communicate effectively with all stakeholders in a professional environment.
  4. 4. Maintain professional and ethical conduct while appropriately applying knowledge of the societal impacts of technology in carrying out workplace responsibilities.
  5. 5. Continually improve professional skills and knowledge to stay current in the field and attain professional advancement.

Educational Objectives of the Undergraduate Program in Computer Information Technology

The B.S. CIT program aims to provide Information Technology graduates with the skills and knowledge to take on appropriate professional positions in information technology after graduation and grow into leadership posi- tions or pursue research or graduate studies in the field. Specifically, the educational objectives of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Technology are to ensure that each graduate is able to:

  1. 1. Explain and apply appropriate information technologies and employ appropriate methodologies to help an individual or organization achieve its goals and objectives.
  2. 2. Manage the information technology resources of an individual or organization.
  3. 3. Anticipate the changing direction of information technology and evaluate and communicate the likely utility of new technologies to an individual or organization.
  4. 4. Understand (and, for some, to contribute to) the scientific, mathematical and theoretical foundations on which information technologies are built.
  5. 5. Live and work as a contributing, well-rounded member of society exhibiting intellectual breadth and lifelong intellectual curiosity required to practice IT management functions creatively, sensitively and responsibly in contemporary global and societal environments.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program in Computer Science

Students who successfully complete the Bachelor of Science Program in Computer Science will be able to:

  1. a. Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.
  2. b. Analyze a problem and specify the computing requirements appropriate to meet desired needs.
  3. c. Apply knowledge of programming concepts, algorithmic principles and data abstraction to design, implement and evaluate the software necessary to solve a specified problem.
  4. d. Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.
  5. e. Understand professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.
  6. f. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  7. g. Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations and society.
  8. h. Recognize the need for and demonstrate an ability to engage in continuing professional development.
  9. i. Use current techniques, skills and software development tools necessary for programming practice.
  10. j. Model and design of computer-based systems in a way that demon- strates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices. k. Apply software engineering principles and practices in the construction of complex software systems

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program in Computer Information Technology

Students graduating from the B.S. CIT program will be able to:

  1. a. Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.
  2. b. Analyze a problem and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.
  3. c. Design, implementa nd evaluate a computer-based system, process, component or program to meet desired needs.
  4. d. Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.
  5. e. Develop an understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.
  6. f. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  7. g. Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations and society.
  8. h. Recognize the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development.
  9. i. An ability to use current techniques, skills and tools necessary for computing practice.
  10. j. Use and apply current technical concepts and practices in the core information technologies.
  11. k. Identify and analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, evaluation and administration of computer-based systems.
  12. l. Effectively integrate IT-based solutions into the user environment. m. Develop an understanding of best practices and standards and their application.
  13. n. Assist in the creation of an effective project plan.

Careers

A degree in computer science can lead to a career as a software engi- neer, designing, implementing, testing and maintaining large software systems, or a career in such specialized fields as computer graphics, computer security, robotics, expert systems, distributed systems, embedded applications, network applications and networking. The degree can lead to a career in almost any industry, including aerospace, manufacturing, banking, health, research, entertainment and educa- tion. A degree in computer information technology can lead to a career in such fields as computer system administration, database adminis- tration, website development and administration, enterprise network administration, computer system analysis, computer system planning, computer forensic analysis and IT management.

Department Programs

The B.S. Degree is Computer Science provides a broad knowledge of computing and is designed for students who desire: (a) to pursue grad- uate work in computer science; and (b) to work on the development and support of software projects in a diverse range of specialized areas. The Computer Science degree consists of a pre-major followed by additional Foundation courses and a 15-unit Senior Electives package. The Core of the program covers programming languages, computer system organization, operating systems, data structures, computation theory and societal implications in computing. The Senior Electives package allows students to specialize in such fields as artificial intelli- gent, embedded applications, networking, gaming, graphics, software engineering and security.

The B.S. Degree in Computer Information Technology is designed for students interested in a professional career involving solving the informational technology infrastructure needs of companies and organizations. An IT professional is able to understand computer systems and solve the computer-related problems of the people they serve. An IT professional assumes responsibility for selecting, installing and maintaining hardware and software products to meet organizational culture and needs. The Computer Information Technology degree consists of a set of Core requirements plus a Domain Emphasis Package that is effectively a minor in another field of study. The pro- gram focuses on the technology and service aspects of the industry rather than information content. Graduates of the program will have an applied knowledge of such fields as web programming, system infra- structure, databases, networking, e-business, project management, data center management, security and information assurance.

A minor in computer science calls for 22 units of study, including courses in computer architecture and assembly language, algorithms and programming, data structure and program design, computer organization, programming language concepts and advanced data structures, along with a choice of electives.

Students in the M.S. programs complete 30 units of graduate work, including 6 units involving a thesis or graduate project.

The Core of the graduate program in Computer Science comprises advanced courses in computation theory, algorithms and data struc- tures, system architectureand software engineering. The electives may be chosen to form a concentration in an area of specialization or to provide a broadly based program of study, whichever is more consistent with the selected thesis or graduate project.

The core of the graduate program in Software Engineering comprises of a series of advanced courses in software engineering. The electives may be chosen for a list that specializes on topics related to software engineering.

Scholarships and Awards

The College of Engineering and Computer Science administers a substantial scholarship program, dispersing more than $60,000 each year to high-achieving engineering and computer science students. The College also administers memorial scholarships and scholarships donated by friends of the University.

Applications and information are available in January, with applications due in early March. Specific dates and further information can be obtained from the College administrative offices.

Honors Cooperative Internship Program

The College offers an opportunity for highly qualified students to work in local industry throughout an entire calendar year. Students work full- time during the summer and half-time during the academic year. Students receive 6 units of academic credit in conjunction with this experience. The program is open to undergraduates who are nearing their senior year, have a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA and have passed the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Graduate students who wish to participate must have a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA. Applicants are matched to employer-supplied job descriptions and scheduled for interviews with prospective employers. The competitive nature of the program usually generates more applicants than available positions. The application period begins in early March and the period of employment is typically from July 1 through June 30.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

The B.S. in Computer Science program requires a total of 120 units, including general education requirements, pre-major Core, major ore and a 15-unit sequence of elective courses referred to below as the Senior Electives. A Computer Science major must complete a mini- mum of 18 residency units of Upper Division Computer Science courses. These must include 12 units of senior electives in addition to all other institutional residency requirements.

Staff

Lauren Julian (Office Manager), Sioneh Keshishian