UNIVERSITY CATALOG: 2020-2021

Courses

ASTR 152. Elementary Astronomy (3)

An introduction to astronomy. Topics to be covered include the historical development of astronomy; the laws that govern the behavior of the universe; a survey of the properties of stars and galaxies, including their origin and evolution; and the Big Bang Theory. Students may not receive credit for both ASTR 152 and ASTR 154. (Available …

ASTR 154. Elementary Astronomy (2)

Corequisite: ASTR 154L. An introduction to astronomy. Topics to be covered include the historical development of astronomy; the laws that govern the behavior of the universe; a survey of the properties of stars and galaxies, including their origin and evolution; and the Big Bang Theory. Students may not receive credit for both ASTR 154 and …

ASTR 154L. Observational Astronomy Lab (1)

Corequisite: ASTR 154. Introduction to the techniques of observational astronomy, including data acquisition and interpretation. Testing of astronomical hypotheses by using data from observations of the moon, planets, sun, stars and galaxies. 3 hours per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided ASTR 154 is also completed.)

ASTR 300. Introductory Astrophysics (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 150B; PHYS 220A or PHYS 225; PHYS 227; and completion of the lower division writing requirement. An upper division course intended for astrophysics majors. The course covers stellar and planetary systems, including: our solar system and planetary and satellite motion, extra-solar planets, the properties of stars, binary and multiple star systems, the stellar life …

ASTR 301. Astrophysics II (3)

Prerequisites: ASTR 300; MATH 150B; PHYS 225; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Course will cover a variety of astrophysics topics: Celestial Mechanics, Magnetohydrodynamic and Cosmology. These topics will include: planetary and satellite motion, planetary rings, binary and multiple star systems, Kepler’s laws, Hydrodynamics, Maxwell’s equations, MHD waves, the solar dynamo and wind, and …

ASTR 352. Current Developments in Astronomy (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In-depth examination and interpretation of astronomical discoveries occurring at the time the course is taught. Reading includes both background material and current periodicals accessible to upper division, General Education students. Likely areas of discussion include spacecraft exploration of the solar system, satellite observations of high-energy radiation from …

ASTR 352L. Current Developments in Astronomy Lab (1)

Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: ASTR 352. Use of observational and laboratory facilities and published data to explore current developments in astronomy. 3 hours per week.

ASTR 401. The Radiative Universe (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 227. Application of the laws of radiation, atomic structure and subatomic structure to astrophysical systems. Cosmic magnetic fields, energy sources, analysis of radiation from stars, nebulae, supernovae, active galaxies and quasars, the early universe and origin of the elements. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 100. Introductory Biology (2)

Corequisite: BIOL 100L. Not for credit in the Biology major. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed BIOL 101, BIOL 102, BIOL 106 or BIOL 107. Analysis of selected topics illustrating major biological concepts, including ecology, evolution, heredity and organismal and cellular structure and physiology. Primarily designed for non-science majors. Lecture …

BIOL 100L. Introductory Biology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL 100. Not for credit in the Biology major. Observations, experiments, demonstrations and required field trips to augment Introductory Biology. Emphasis on the methods of science, basic biological principles, the natural environment and the effects of human activity on the environment. Lab 3 hours. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity. Students satisfy the B2 Life Science requirement …

BIOL 101. General Biology (3)

Not for credit in the Biology major and may not be taken for credit by students who have completed BIOL 106 or BIOL 107. Analysis of selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including evolution, environmental relationships, heredity, the cell, energetics and functions of living systems, and development. (Available for General Education, B2 Life Science. …

BIOL 101L. General Biology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL 101. Not for credit in the Biology major and may not be taken for credit by students who have completed BIOL 106 or BIOL 107. Analysis of selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including evolution, environmental relationships, heredity, the cell, energetics and functions of living systems, and development. (Available for General Education, …

BIOL 102CS/LCS. Biological Concepts and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: For Liberal Studies majors only or instructor consent. Corequisite: BIOL 102L. Not open for credit in the Biology major or for students who have already completed BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 106 or BIOL 107. Analysis of selected topics illustrating major biological concepts, including ecology, evolution, heredity, organismal and cellular structure, presented in the …

BIOL 106. Biological Principles I (3)*

Corequisite: BIOL 106L. Primarily for Biology majors. Half of a two-semester sequence that includes BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L. Selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including the scientific process, heredity, evolution, taxonomy and systematics, ecology and animal behavior. Observations, experiments and demonstrations. Emphasis on unifying biological concepts and methods in science. Lecture 3 hours. …

BIOL 106L. Biological Principles I Lab (1)*

Corequisite: BIOL 106. Primarily for Biology majors. Half of a two-semester sequence that includes BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L. Selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including the scientific process, heredity, evolution, taxonomy and systematics, ecology and animal behavior. Observations, experiments and demonstrations. Emphasis on unifying biological concepts and methods in science. Lab 3 hours. …

BIOL 107. Biological Principles II (3)*

Corequisite: BIOL 107L. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L. Half of a two-semester sequence that includes BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L. Selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including biological chemistry, cells, molecular genetics, animal development and plant and animal physiology. Observations, experiments and demonstrations. Emphasis on unifying biological concepts and methods in science. …

BIOL 107L. Biological Principles II Lab (1)*

Corequisite: BIOL 107. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L. Half of a two-semester sequence that includes BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L. Selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including biological chemistry, cells, molecular genetics, animal development and plant and animal physiology. Observations, experiments and demonstrations. Emphasis on unifying biological concepts and methods in science. …

BIOL 211. Human Anatomy (2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L. Not for credit in Biology major. Survey of the gross anatomy and histology of the major human organ systems, including the muscle, skeletal, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. Lecture 2 hours.

BIOL 212. Laboratory Studies in Human Anatomy (1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L. Not for credit in Biology major. Examination of the anatomy and histology of the major organ systems by dissection and microscopic study. Lab 3 hours.

BIOL 213. Human Anatomy for Health Sciences (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L passed with grades of “C” or better, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L each passed with grades of “C” or better. Not for credit in Biology major. Survey of the gross anatomy and histology of the major human organ systems, including the muscle, skeletal, digestive, …

BIOL 215/L. Introductory Microbiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L; CHEM 100 and CHEM 100L, or CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Corequisite: BIOL 215L. Preparatory: BIOL 281 or CHEM 235. Introduction to the biology of major groups of microorganisms, including their role in infectious …

BIOL 218. Microbes and People (2)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: BIOL 218L. Not available for Biology majors. Acquaints non-science majors with the microbial world, explores the involvement of microbes in disease, food production, and the environment. Lecture 2 hours. (Available for General Education, B2 Life Science. Students satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing …

BIOL 218L. Microbes and People Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: BIOL 218. Not available for Biology majors. Acquaints non-science majors with the microbial world, explores the involvement of microbes in disease, food production, and the environment. Lab 3 hours. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity. Students satisfy the B2 Life Science requirement by completing …

BIOL 247L. Introduction to Molecular Biology Research Lab (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 107/L passed with grades of “C” or better; CHEM 101. Introduction to theory and techniques used in molecular biology research. Students learn through hands-on experience in the laboratory the experimental design, technical mechanisms, and interpretation of commonly used molecular biology experiments including: issues of laboratory safety, using bioinformatics in research, isolation and manipulation of DNA, …

BIOL 281. Human Physiology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L passed with grades of “C” or better, or both BIOL 106/L and BIOL 107/L each passed with grades of “C” or better. Survey of the physiology of nerve and muscle, as well as the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL 282. Lab Experiments in Human Physiology (1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L passed with grades of “C” or better, or both BIOL 106/L and BIOL 107/L each passed with grades of “C” or better. Recommended Corequisite: BIOL 281. Selected lab experiments in human physiology. Lab 3 hours.

BIOL 292. Wild SoCal (2)

Corequisite: BIOL 292L (consisting of field trips). For non-science majors to acquaint them with the more important wild plants and animals of Southern California; criticism by students of case studies involving the application of scientific methods purported to answer questions about a few of these organisms. Lecture 2 hours. Students may not receive credit for …

BIOL 292L. Field Studies in Biology – Wild SoCal (1)

Corequisite: BIOL 292. 3 hours per week or equivalent. Course Fee. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity. Students satisfy the B2 Life Science requirement by completing BIOL 292.)

BIOL 306. In the Light of Evolution (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. No prior knowledge of biology is required. This course popularizes the processes of biological evolution, evidence that evolution has occurred, dips into how evolution guides research, and serves as a conceptual theme and sketches evolutionary history retrospective from humans. Not for credit in the Biology major. (Available …

BIOL 312/L. Vertebrate Biology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisites: BIOL 312L, BIOL 392F. Introduction to the biology of vertebrates, including aspects of their evolution, ecology, life history, and behavior. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 313/L. Invertebrate Zoology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisites: BIOL 313L, BIOL 392B. Biology and classification of the invertebrate animals, with emphasis on marine forms. Evolutionary and adaptive implications of form and function will be considered. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 315/L. Principles of Microbiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L. Corequisite: BIOL 315L. Preparatory: CHEM 333. Credit will not be allowed for both BIOL 215 and BIOL 315. Introduction to the biology of microorganisms with emphasis on the bacteria. General course designed for Biology majors and …

BIOL 316CS/LCS. Plant Biology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 316LCS. Survey course with lecture and lab sections covering aspects of the cytology, anatomy, development, physiology, genetics, and evolution unique to plants. Offers a community-based learning opportunity with activities relating …

BIOL 322. Evolutionary Biology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106/L and BIOL 107/L passed with grades of “C” or better. Introduction to the mechanisms of evolution, drawing heavily on relevant principles in ecology, population genetics and systematics. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL 323. Plants and Animals of Southern California (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. For non-science majors to acquaint them with the classification, behavior, ecology and distribution of the more important plants and animals of Southern California. Lecture 3 hours. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.)

BIOL 324. The World of the Dinosaurs (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course is a study of dinosaurs and the world in which they lived from the time of their first appearance to their extinction. The evolutionary patterns exhibited by dinosaurs are explored via an examination of their spatial and temporal distribution through time, considering connections to the …

BIOL 325. Life in the Sea (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Not for credit in the Biology major. From the shore to the depths, analysis of the diversity of life in the world’s oceans with emphasis on the Southern California biota. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.) (IC)

BIOL 325L. Life in the Sea Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Corequisite: BIOL 325. Not for credit in Biology major. Studies of the classification, anatomy, physiology, behavior and ecology of marine organisms through lab and field exercises.

BIOL 327. Ecology and People (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Our influence on the environment and the influence of the environment on us. Lecture 3 hours. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning or E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

BIOL 330/L. Design and Analysis of Experiments and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; One of the following: MATH 105, MATH 140 or MATH 255A. Corequisite: BIOL 330L. Structuring biological experiments to maximize useful results and presenting the results graphically and quantitatively. Although emphasis is placed on data collected during ecological field …

BIOL 341. Human Pregnancy and Embryology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 100, or BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 102/L, or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L, or BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Available for Biology minor credit but not for Biology major. Description of biological events leading up to ovulation, emission, conception, implantation and pregnancy, …

BIOL 347L. Introduction to Cell and Stem Cell Culture Lab (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 247L and BIOL 375. Introduction to theory and techniques used in cell and stem cell culture research. Students learn through hands-on experience in the laboratory the experimental design, technical mechanisms, and interpretation of commonly used techniques in cell culture including: issues of laboratory safety, aseptic technique, media choice and preparation, cell cryoretrieval, cell …

BIOL 360. Genetics (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L; MATH 105 (or MATH 102 and MATH 104) or equivalent pre-calculus preparation; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Role of genes in heredity, development, cellular metabolism and function of organisms; introduction …

BIOL 362. Genetics and Society (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and BIOL 100L, or BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 102/L, or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L, or BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better and completion of the lower division writing requirement. A non-technical introduction to current topics in genetics and their impact on society …

BIOL 362L. Genetics and Society Lab (1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and BIOL 100L, or BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 102/L, or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L, or BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: BIOL 362. Introduction to current topics in genetics and their impact on society and life, …

BIOL 366. Biology of Disease (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Biological aspects of the major diseases of humans, including heart disease, cancer, autoimmune diseases, hereditary diseases, and bacterial and viral diseases will be presented. Principles of immunology, chemotherapy, and genetic engineering will also be introduced. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.) (IC)

BIOL 375. Emerging Issues in Regenerative Medicine (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Basic concepts, experimental approaches and the therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem cells, human adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine will be discussed in this course. The politics and ethics of this emerging field of medicine and how these will affect you …

BIOL 380. Cell Biology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L, or CHEM 104. Preparatory: CHEM 235 or CHEM 333. Study of the organization of cells with emphasis on structure, chemical composition, bioenergetics, metabolism, regulation of the metabolism, cell differentiation and special cell functions. (BIOL …

BIOL 381. Cell Biology Lab (1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L, or CHEM 104. Preparatory: CHEM 235 or CHEM 333. Recommended Corequisite: BIOL 380. Basic lab techniques in cell biology, including calorimetry and spectrophotometry, centrifugation, enzymological assays, respirometry, cell counting and molecular methods. Lab 3 hours. …

BIOL 382/L. Human Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. A consideration of the structure and workings of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, with special reference to humans. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 383/L. Human Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 382/L. A consideration of the structure and workings of the cardiovascular, renal, reproductive, endocrine and immune systems, with special reference to humans. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 392B-F. Field Studies in Biology (1)

3 hours per week or equivalent. Course Fee. Course Title Corequisite BIOL 392B Invertebrate Zoology BIOL 313/L BIOL 392E Plants and Animals of Southern California BIOL 323 BIOL 392F Vertebrate Zoology BIOL 312/L

BIOL 404/L. Phycology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 404L, BIOL 492Y. Preparatory: BIOL 322. Study of the algae with emphasis on their systematics, morphology, physiology and ecology. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 406/L. Flowering Plant Systematics and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106/L and BIOL 107/L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisites: BIOL 406L, BIOL 492K. Classification, identification and evolutionary relationships of flowering plants. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 407/L. Plant Ecology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106/L; BIOL 107/L. All prerequisite courses must be passed with grades of “C” or better; BIOL 322. Corequisites: BIOL 407L, BIOL 492N. Examination of plants and their habitats from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Concepts of adaptation, species diversity and biological change over time are stressed. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab …

BIOL 408/L. Applied Microbiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; BIOL 215/L or BIOL 315/L. Corequisite: BIOL 408L. Examination of the role of microbes and their control in the production and deterioration of foods, in industry, in agriculture, in waste disposal and in the production of …

BIOL 409/L. Non-Flowering Plants and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisites: BIOL 409L, BIOL 492J. The diversity of land plants other than angiosperms (mosses, ferns, conifers, etc.): their phylogeny, life cycles, ecological niches, biogeography, identification and comparative biology. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 410/L. Medical Microbiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 315 and BIOL 380 passed with grades of “C” or better; BIOL 315L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L; MATH 105 (or MATH 102 and MATH 104) or MPT2A; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: BIOL 410L. Study of microbial pathogens with emphasis on bacterial mechanisms of pathogenicity, …

BIOL 411/L. Animal Histology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 411L. Preparatory: CHEM 334. Microscopical and histochemical analysis of mammalian cells as organized into tissue and organ systems. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 412/L. Herpetology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 412L, BIOL 492E. Biology, ecology and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Adaptive significance of form and function is stressed. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 413/L. Entomology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 413L, BIOL 492AA. Biology and classification of insects with emphasis on phylogeny and on adaptive implications of morphology. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 414/L. Avian Ecology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 414L, BIOL 492A. Consideration of the interactions between birds and their environment, including such topics as habitat requirements, resource utilization, species interactions, territoriality and reproduction. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 415/L. Mammalogy and Lab (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322. Corequisite: BIOL 492M. Classification, ethology and ecology of mammals. Adaptive and evolutionary significance of form and function are considered. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 417/L. Microbial Physiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 215/L or BIOL 315/L. Corequisite: BIOL 417L. Preparatory: CHEM 333; BIOL 380. Metabolism and special physiology of microbial forms of life, with special emphasis on the bacteria. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 418/L. Bacterial Diversity and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 315/L. Corequisite: BIOL 418L. Analysis of evolution, diversity and relationships among the bacteria, as illustrated by a detailed study of the more specialized groups of bacteria with regard to cell form, habitat and developmental abilities. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 419/L. Microbial Ecology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 315/L. Corequisites: BIOL 419L, BIOL 492C. Examination of the natural distribution of bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa in the biosphere and a study of the physical, chemical and biological factors that govern their distribution. Inquiry into the role of microbes as they interact directly and indirectly with higher organisms in the ecosystem. Available for graduate …

BIOL 421/L. Marine Biology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisites: BIOL 421L, BIOL 492B. Preparatory: BIOL 322. Marine life of the world with special emphasis on the shore and shallow sea. Identification, distribution, physiological and morphological adaptation of marine forms. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab …

BIOL 422/L. Physiological Ecology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 422L. Preparatory: BIOL 322. Study of physiological, morphological and behavioral responses of organisms to physical environmental factors such as temperature, light and water salinity. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 423. Field Ecology (2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 492F. Techniques used in studying population dynamics, the development and functioning of biological communities and the interaction among organisms in the natural environment. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours.

BIOL 425. Animal Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Recommended Corequisite: BIOL 492D. Ecology, genetics and evolution of behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates with emphasis on organisms in their natural environment. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 426/L. Biology of Deserts and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106/L; BIOL 107/L. All prerequisite courses must be passed with grades of “C” or better; BIOL 322. Corequisites: BIOL 426L, BIOL 492P. Study of life in deserts with emphasis on the organisms of the deserts of Southwestern U.S.; structural, physiological and behavioral adaptations for survival; identification and ecology of desert organisms; techniques for studying desert …

BIOL 427/L. Principles of Ecology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322. Corequisites: BIOL 427L, BIOL 492H. Lectures summarize the major concepts and controversies of ecology. Discussions and activities focus on case studies from the classic and recent original literature. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 427A/AL. Biology of Pelagic Organisms and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 427AL, BIOL 492L. Survey of organisms occupying the open ocean environment; ecological, morphological and physiological adaptations of selected groups; population dynamics, community structure and fisheries biology. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 428/L. Wildlife Ecology and Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L; BIOL 107, BIOL 107L. All prerequisite courses must be passed with grades of “C” or better; BIOL 322. Corequisites: BIOL 428L, BIOL 492W. Recommended Preparatory: BIOL 330/L. Study and application of ecological principles used in the management of wildlife. Practical examination of management techniques and tools used in monitoring and managing wildlife …

BIOL 429/L. Marine Ecology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 429L, BIOL 492I. Marine community structure and dynamics. Study of the open seas, rocky and sandy shores, and bays are used to illustrate the basic features of marine communities. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 430/L. Ichthyology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 430L, BIOL 492BB. Biology, ecology and evolution of fish. Emphasis placed on adaptive significance of form and function. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 431/L. Food Microbiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 215/L, BIOL 315/L or equivalent. Corequisite: BIOL 431L. The biology, ecology and physiology of microorganisms associated with food and beverage production, preservation, spoilage, food borne illness and contamination control. Procedures and techniques for isolation, detection, identification and enumeration of food microorganisms. Methods and principles for controlling microbial contamination and preventing growth of undesirable …

BIOL 432/L. Comparative Anatomy and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 432L. Evolution of vertebrate structure. Comparative morphology and function of vertebrate systems. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 433/L. Biology of Marine Tetrapods and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 433L. Recommended Preparatory: BIOL 322. Several groups of reptiles, birds and mammals exhibit many specializations for living in the marine realm. These animals are secondarily adapted to the marine environment, having evolved from terrestrial ancestors. This course will explore the evolution, …

BIOL 434/L. Ecology of Marine Fishes and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 430/L, BIOL 492BB. Corequisites: BIOL 434L, BIOL 492Q. Species assemblages, general ecology, adaptations and behavioral ecology of near shore marine fishes. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 435/L. Parasitology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L passed with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: BIOL 435L. Study of the biology of parasites and other symbionts. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 437/L. Biology of Fungi and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 315/L; BIOL 380; CHEM 333. Corequisites: BIOL 437L; BIOL 492V. Recommended Preparatory: BIOL 407/L; BIOL 492N. A survey of the diversity of fungi, their phylogeny, genetics, structure, life cycles, habitats, mutualisms, pathogenesis and laboratory identification. Field trips are conducted to collect macroscopic and microscopic fungi as well as mutualistic and non-human pathogenic microscopic fungi. …

BIOL 438/L. Tropical Botany and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: Students taking this course must also be enrolled in other linked courses that are part of the Tropical Biology semester (BIOL 439/L, BIOL 446/L, BIOL 448, BIOL 449 as offered). Preparatory: BIOL 312, BIOL 316CS, BIOL 330, BIOL 427. Intensive, hands-on immersion into the biology …

BIOL 439/L. Tropical Ecology and Conservation and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: Students taking this course must also be enrolled in other linked courses that are part of the Tropical Biology semester (BIOL 438/L, BIOL 446/L, BIOL 448, BIOL 449 as offered). Preparatory: BIOL 312, BIOL 316CS, BIOL 330, BIOL 427. Intensive, hands-on immersion in the ecology …

BIOL 441/L. Embryology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: BIOL 360 or BIOL 380. Corequisite: BIOL 441L. Cellular, physiological and anatomical aspects of embryonic development with emphasis on vertebrates. Mechanisms of morphogenesis and differentiation. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 442/L. Developmental Biology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: Previously passed or concurrently enrolled in BIOL 360 or BIOL 380; or enrolled in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 442L. The mechanisms of cell and organ differentiation in animals (e.g., Caenorhabditis) and plants (e.g., Arabidopsis). The majority of topics involve working with mutants and wildtypes on the relationship between genetics and phenotypes. Some lab projects will use …

BIOL 444. Biology of Viruses (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360 and BIOL 380; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Comparative survey of the structure, gene expression and replication of viruses. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 446/L. Biology of Tropical Vertebrates and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: Students taking this course must also be enrolled in other linked courses that are part of the Tropical Biology semester (BIOL 438/L, BIOL 439/L, BIOL 448, BIOL 449 as offered). Preparatory: BIOL 312, BIOL 316CS, BIOL 330, BIOL 427. Intensive, hands-on immersion into the biology of tropical vertebrates, including …

BIOL 447/L. Full Immersion Research Experience (FIRE) and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 380; CHEM 333, CHEM 334; PHYS 100A, PHYS 100B. Corequisite: BIOL 447L. Innovative undergraduate experience in creativity that invites participants to engage scientific research in its fullness as co-learners. Student-initiated ideas ascend through a system of collaborative and independent strategies involving peer review, recitation, tutorials, experimental work and oral and written communication. Available for …

BIOL 448. Tropical Biodiversity (2)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: Students taking this course must also be enrolled in other linked courses that are part of the Tropical Biology semester (BIOL 438/L, BIOL 439/L, BIOL 446/L, BIOL 449 as offered). Preparatory: BIOL 312, BIOL 316CS, BIOL 330, BIOL 427. Examination of the generation and maintenance …

BIOL 449. Seminar on Topics in Tropical Biology (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322. Corequisites: Students taking this course must also be enrolled in other linked courses that are part of the Tropical Biology semester (BIOL 438/L, BIOL 439/L, BIOL 446/L, BIOL 448 as offered). Preparatory: BIOL 312, BIOL 316CS, BIOL 330, BIOL 427. Seminar addressing topics in tropical biology in the context of physical science, culture and politics.

BIOL 451. Tropical Biology (3)

Prerequisites: Biology major, BIOL 322 or equivalent; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Preparatory: At least one course that deals with the evolution and ecology of a major group of organisms. Examination of life functions and biotic interactions under conditions occurring in low latitude environments. Emphasis on characteristics and evolution of tropical biotas and their significance in relation …

BIOL 452/L. Molecular Markers in Evolutionary Studies and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 322 and BIOL 360; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 452L. The use of molecular data in ecology and evolutionary biology. Material will cover techniques and applications of molecular data in conservation, behavior, ecology, population biology, evolution and systematics. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 453/L. Behavioral Ecology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisites: BIOL 453L, BIOL 492Z. Study of the interactions between individuals and the environment. Emphasis placed on the behavioral adaptations of animals. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 456. Conservation Biology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 322 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 492O. Application of ecological and evolutionary principles to problems in environmental biology. Factors affecting biodiversity and causes of species extinction receive particular attention. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 461. The Molecular Genetics of Microorganisms (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360, BIOL 380; CHEM 333; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Discussion of the molecular structure of the gene, the chemistry of gene action, mutagenic agents and genetic control mechanisms in microorganisms. Emphasis placed on experimental basis for current concepts in molecular genetics. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 462. Molecular Genetics of Eukaryotic Organisms (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360, BIOL 380; CHEM 333, CHEM 334; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Examination of the structure and function of chromatin, the structure of DNA and its associated proteins in chromosomes, replication of DNA and chromatin, transcription, RNA processing, recombination and the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 464. Human Biochemical Genetics (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360; CHEM 461 and CHEM 462, or CHEM 365; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Focus on different sources of human biochemical defects, the detection of such disorders and their treatment. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 466. Genetics of Bacteria and Their Viruses (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 315/L and BIOL 360; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Study of the genetic systems found in bacteria, including transformation, conjugation and transduction. Viral replication, recombination and interaction with their bacterial hosts are investigated from a genetic perspective. Transposable elements, plasmids and other selected topics of current interest in this field are explored. Lecture 3 …

BIOL 467/L. Bacterial Genetics and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 315/L. Corequisite: BIOL 467L. Recommended Preparatory: BIOL 380; CHEM 333. A survey of the genetic systems found in bacteria and their viruses including, transformation, conjugation, transduction, mutant isolation, complementation, plasmids, transposons, gene expression and regulation. Viral replication, recombination and interaction with their bacterial hosts are investigated from a genetic perspective. The laboratory consists …

BIOL 468. Human Genetics (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360; MATH 105 or MATH 140 or score on Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) sufficient for admission to MATH 255A. Study of variation and heredity in humans. Includes immunogenetics, polygenic inheritance and population genetics, as well as abnormalities of chromosomes and metabolism and their consequences. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL 469. Molecular Diagnostics and Clinical Chemistry (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360; MATH 105 or MATH 140 or a score on the Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) sufficient for admission to MATH 255A; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Survey of principles and applications in molecular research and clinical chemistry. Topics include analytical techniques and instrumentation in the detection of biological molecules, and pathophysiology. Lecture 3 …

BIOL 470. Biotechnology (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 360. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: BIOL 380. Application of organisms, biological systems and processes to manufacturing and service industries. Role of microorganisms in industrial, agricultural and pharmaceutical processes, biologically produced sources of energy, single cell protein, waste management, mining and other areas. Impact of genetic engineering; enzyme biotechnology; recent advances in the genetics …

BIOL 471A. Molecular Diagnostics (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360; MATH 105 or MATH 140 or score on the Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) sufficient for admission to MATH 225A; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Survey of current techniques, applications and goals of molecular genetics research, including cloning strategies and techniques, genetic engineering techniques, progress in the Human Genome Project and related work, gene …

BIOL 472/L. Recombinant DNA Techniques and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360, CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 472L. Preparatory: BIOL 380. Handling and processing of recombinant DNA, including DNA isolation, use of restriction enzymes, gel electrophoresis, ligation, cloning, blots, hybridization and associated microbiological techniques. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 473. Clinical Cytogenetics and Cancer Genetics (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 468. Examination of the cytogenetics of human cancers and of hereditary predisposition to cancer, including rare and common familial cancer syndromes, risk assessment and surveillance, epidemiology and current research, ethics and genetic counseling in genetic risk assessment for cancer. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 475/L. Biological Imaging and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: BIOL 380 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 475L. Theoretical and practical aspects of imaging as applied to cellular and molecular biology, biotechnology and histology. Covers transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy, including confocal microscopy, as well as MRI, PET and CAT scanning. Computer image processing and analysis, and the …

BIOL 476. Topics in Stem Cell Research (3-3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360, BIOL 380. Student analyses of novel biological research methods associated with emerging stem cell technologies. Topics will include all types of stem cells and development of each, a detailed examination of relevant human stem cell techniques, including both basic research and translational/clinical research methods. Not available for graduate credit. May be repeated …

BIOL 477/L. Cell and Tissue Culture and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: BIOL 380 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 477L. Preparatory: BIOL 315/L. Theoretical and practical studies of animal and plant cell cultures. Techniques for primary and continuous cultures and the production of hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies are covered. Other topics include cell culture storage, karyotyping, somatic embryogenesis, cytodifferentiation and application of cell …

BIOL 479. Endocrinology (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 380 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Preparatory: BIOL 281 or BIOL 482. A comprehensive study of the organization and function of the major endocrine organs. Lectures will focus on the hormonal control mechanisms that regulate metabolism, reproduction, development and growth. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 480/L. Cellular Physiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 380 and CHEM 334; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Corequisite: BIOL 480L. In-depth consideration of cellular physicochemistry, including organellar structure, composition and function, macromolecular biosynthesis, metabolism, membrane transport and bioelectric phenomena. 8 class hours of integrated lecture and lab. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 481/L. Plant Physiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 380; CHEM 334. Corequisite: BIOL 481L. Plant functions: photosynthesis, respiration, cell mechanics, growth and water relationships. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 482/L. Animal Physiology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: BIOL 380. Corequisite: BIOL 482L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A and PHYS 100AL; PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL; CHEM 334. Examination of the processes and mechanisms by which organisms maintain themselves and interact with their environment. Adaptive significance of physiologic mechanisms is treated under certain topics. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 483/L. Principles of Neurophysiology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: BIOL 380 or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Preparatory: BIOL 480 or BIOL 482; CHEM 334; PHYS 100A, PHYS 100B. Recommended Corequisite: BIOL 483L. Examination of the structure, function and physiological principles of the nervous system. Surveys neuroanatomy, molecular neurobiology, sensory reception and relevant human neurological disorders. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours. Available …

BIOL 485/L. Immunology with Serology Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: BIOL 380. Corequisite: BIOL 485L. Preparatory: BIOL 381. Study of the immune response examining humoral and cellular immunity, the nature, structure and reactions of antigens and antibodies, mediators of immunity, hypersensitivity and immuno-hematology. The lab emphasizes the principles and uses of serological methods for evaluation of the immune response. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 …

BIOL 487/L. Hematology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 380; CHEM 334. Corequisite: BIOL 487L. Histological, biochemical and clinical diagnostic study of blood, blood cell formation, iron metabolism, blood pathology and practical lab technology. Available for graduate credit. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

BIOL 489. Cellular Immunology (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 485. Advanced studies on the cellular interactions and mechanisms of the immune response, including clinical aspects of cell-mediated reactions and immunologic disorders. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 490. Tutorial Studies (1)

Prerequisite: With consent of instructor, open to senior Biology majors. Supervised individual projects involving reading and discussion, lab research or field studies in specific areas of biology. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 units. Does not carry graduate credit toward the M.S. degree in Biology.

BIOL 492A-Z. Field Studies in Biology (1-2)

The 400-level courses are available for graduate credit. Course fee. One unit each, 3 hours per week or equivalent: Course Title Corequisite BIOL 492A Avian Ecology BIOL 414/L BIOL 492B Marine Biology BIOL 421/L BIOL 492C Microbial Ecology BIOL 419/L BIOL 492D Animal Behavior BIOL 425 BIOL 492E Herpetology BIOL 412/L BIOL 492H Principles of …

BIOL 493. Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 315/L and BIOL 380; or enrollment in the Biology M.S. program. Preparatory: BIOL 410/L. Intensive study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis, including the contribution of the host response, with emphasis on recent developments and comparative principles. Lecture 3 hours. Available for graduate credit.

BIOL 495A-E. Directed Undergraduate Research (3)

Designed for students of advanced rank and proven competence in Biology. Program of original research, culminating in a written report, to be carried out with one of the Biology faculty. May be repeated for credit but no more than 3 units may be applied to the elective section of options that allows its use. Course …

BIOL 496A-Z. Experimental Topics in Biology (2-4)

Special studies in Biology with topics to be determined.

BIOL 497EE. Supervised Off-Campus Experiential Education (1-6)

Not for graduate credit toward M.S. degree in Biology. Student work experiences that are planned, organized and evaluated by faculty in cooperation with organizations other than the University’s academic departments. No remuneration for this work may be received in addition to academic credit. Academic Internship course. (Credit/No Credit only)

BIOL 498. Senior Thesis (2)

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Biology; Consent of instructor. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: BIOL 330, BIOL 499. Student selects and does original research on a topic of current biological interest in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member. Results of this research are presented both orally and in a written report in scientific format.

BIOL 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Not for graduate credit toward M.S. degree in Biology. Maximum of 3 units of Independent Study may be applied to satisfy unit requirements of elective areas for the baccalaureate degree in Biology.

BIOL 502. Biometry (3)

Application of quantitative methods to variation patterns in biological systems, their analysis and interpretation. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL 502L. Biometry Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL 502. Students have supervised time to work problem sets. Lab 3 hours.

BIOL 503/L. Bioinformatics and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 360, BIOL 322. Corequisite: BIOL 503L. Bioinformatics tools (statistics and computer analysis) and their application to molecular data analysis. Lecture 3 hours, computer lab 3 hours.

BIOL 532/L. Advanced Ichthyology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 430/L; BIOL 492BB; Graduate standing. Corequisite: BIOL 532L. Advanced topics in ichthyology and fisheries biology. Advanced biosystematics of fishes; reproduction; age and growth; ecology, including feeding and community structure. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours.

BIOL 551/L. Computer Modeling in Biology and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: BIOL 322, BIOL 360. Corequisite: BIOL 551L. Selected topics illustrating methods of computer modeling of biological systems. Students will be introduced in lecture and in computer laboratories to programming skills related to biological sciences and statistical analysis, including population genetics, cellular and molecular biology, physiological biology and ecology. Emphasis on understanding the role that …

BIOL 615B-G. Seminar in Organismal and Population Biology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 691; One or more 400-level courses in the area of specialization; Graduate status. Advanced study, including student preparation and presentation of reports, in one of the following areas of biology: Course Title BIOL 615B Morphology BIOL 615C Ecology BIOL 615E Biogeography BIOL 615F Evolution BIOL 615G Tropical Biology

BIOL 655A-H. Seminar in Cellular and Molecular Biology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 691; One or more 400-level courses in the area of specialization; Graduate status. Advanced study, including student preparation and presentation of reports, in one of the following areas of biology: Course Title BIOL 655A Microbiology BIOL 655B Cellular Biology BIOL 655C Development BIOL 655D Genetics BIOL 655E Physiology BIOL 655G Molecular Biology BIOL …

BIOL 691. Graduate Proseminar (3)

Recommended to be taken early in the graduate program in preparation for further graduate coursework and the presentation of papers at professional meetings. Preparation and presentation of seminars based on current literature in biology.

BIOL 692. Biology Colloquium (1)

Guest lecturers (contemporary researchers) presenting talks on a variety of topics in biological research. Each presentation will be followed by discussion involving student participation. (Credit/No Credit only)

BIOL 696A-E. Directed Graduate Research (3)

Designed for M.S. students conducting thesis research. May be repeated for credit but no more than 6 units may be applied to the M.S. degree. Course Title BIOL 696A Microbiology BIOL 696B Marine Biology BIOL 696C Cellular/Molecular/Physiology BIOL 696D Genetics/Developmental BIOL 696E Ecology and Evolution

BIOL 698. Thesis (3)

Prerequisites: Classified status in Biology; Consent of instructor. Preparing and writing the master’s thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 units.

CHEM 100. Principles of Chemistry (3)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or exemption. One semester course based on a systematic, semi-empirical approach to the submicroscopic world of chemistry. Development of modern ideas concerning atomic and molecular structure, principles of compound formation, and chemical reactivity are emphasized. Selected topics in applied chemistry and the application of chemical principles to life …

CHEM 100L. Principles of Chemistry Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or exemption. Corequisite: CHEM 100. Optional laboratory course to accompany CHEM 100 in which the fundamentals of scientific inquiry and basic laboratory techniques are presented. One 3-hour lab per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity provided CHEM 100 is also completed.)

CHEM 101. General Chemistry I (4)

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test (CPT) or a grade of “C” or higher (“C-” does not satisfy the prerequisite) in CHEM 100 taken at CSUN only. Basic course in the fundamental principles and theories with special emphasis on chemical calculations. Includes a discussion of the kinetic molecular theory, atomic structures, the periodic …

CHEM 101L. General Chemistry I Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test (CPT) or a grade of “C” or higher (“C-” does not satisfy the prerequisite) in CHEM 100 taken at CSUN only. Corequisite: CHEM 101. Lab section emphasizes basic lab skills, quantitative relationships in chemistry and inorganic preparative procedures. One 3-hour lab per week. (Available for General Education, …

CHEM 102. General Chemistry II (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L with a minimum grade of “C-” in CHEM 101. Continuation of CHEM 101. Introduction to kinetics, gas phase and solution equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, radio, organic chemistry and the descriptive chemistry of the more familiar metals and nonmetals. Recitation portion deals with problem solving, review of the lecture material …

CHEM 102L. General Chemistry II Lab (1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L with a minimum grade of “C-” in CHEM 101. Corequisite: CHEM 102. Lab section consists of experiments dealing with kinetics, acid-base and solubility equilibria, selected reactions of metals and nonmetals, and qualitative elemental analysis. One 3-hour lab per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided CHEM 102 is …

CHEM 103. Introductory Chemistry I (3)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or exemption. Not open to engineering, biology or physical science majors. Designed to stress fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, the structure of atoms and molecules, the periodic table, states of matter, chemical calculations involving stoichiometry and simple algebraic operations. 3 hours lecture per week. (Available for General Education, …

CHEM 103L. Introductory Chemistry I Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or exemption. Corequisite: CHEM 103. Not open to engineering, biology or physical science majors. Designed to stress fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, the structure of atoms and molecules, the periodic table, states of matter, chemical calculations involving stoichiometry and simple algebraic operations. One 3-hour lab per week. (Available …

CHEM 104. Introductory Chemistry II (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Not open to engineering, biology or physical science majors. Continuation of CHEM 103/L. Properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases. Chemistry of simple organic compounds and common elements. 3 hours lecture per week. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by …

CHEM 104L. Introductory Chemistry II Lab (1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Corequisite: CHEM 104. Not open to engineering, biology or physical science majors. Continuation of CHEM 103/L. Properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases. Chemistry of simple organic compounds and common elements. One 3-hour lab per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided CHEM 104 is also …

CHEM 110. Chemistry in Action (3)

One-semester course introducing chemistry and its relation to technological advances and their impact on our society and the environment. 3 hours lecture per week. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing CHEM 110L).

CHEM 110L. Chemistry in Action Lab (1)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 100 or CHEM 110. No credit for Science and Engineering majors. Lab-demonstration course that accompanies CHEM 110. Lab experiments and demonstrations to augment lecture material are performed. Introduction to some basic lab skills. One 3-hour lab per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided CHEM 100 …

CHEM 235/L. Introductory Organic Chemistry and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L, or CHEM 104 and CHEM 104L. Corequisite: CHEM 235L. A course describing simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds with an emphasis on the chemistry of functional groups. 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour lab per week. No credit for Science and Engineering majors, except for certain options in Biology and Geology; consult …

CHEM 321/L. Chemical Analysis I and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L. Corequisite: CHEM 321L. Emphasizes the principles of analytical reactions and the theory and applications of instruments to problems of chemical analysis. Principal topics include volumetric methods and instrumental techniques such as spectrophotometry, electro chemistry and chromatography. Lab: Introduction to the experimental methods of analytical chemistry based on the theory covered …

CHEM 333/L. Organic Chemistry I and Lab (4/1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L with a minimum grade of “C-” in CHEM 102. Corequisite: CHEM 333L. The study of the structure and properties of organic molecules with special emphasis on functional groups and their reactions. Attention given to the mechanisms of organic reactions and the spectroscopic techniques used to determine the structure of …

CHEM 334/L. Organic Chemistry II and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 333/L with a minimum grade of “C-” in CHEM 333. Corequisite: CHEM 334L (all majors), CHEM 334R for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 334R for all other majors. Continuation of CHEM 333, with an emphasis on mechanisms of organic reactions and synthesis. Attention given to representative compounds of interest in biology …

CHEM 334R. Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry II (1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 333/L. Corequisite: CHEM 334. Critical analysis of topics introduced in CHEM 334. Structured group work is used to develop essential analysis and problem-solving skills. 1 hour per week.

CHEM 351. Physical Chemistry I (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L; PHYS 220A or PHYS 225; MATH 150B or MATH 255B. Corequisite for Chemistry B.A. and B.S. majors: CHEM 351L. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 351L and MATH 250. Basic laws of thermodynamics, states and changes of state, solutions, equilibria, phase rule, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 4 hours …

CHEM 351L. Physical Chemistry I Lab (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 351. Laboratory course for CHEM 351. Introduction to the experimental methods of physical chemistry based on the concepts covered in CHEM 351. One 3-hour lab per week. (Offered Fall semester.)

CHEM 352. Physical Chemistry II (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 321/L, CHEM 351; PHYS 220B or PHYS 226. Corequisite for Chemistry B.S. majors: CHEM 352L. Recommended Corequisite for Biochemistry B.S.: CHEM 352L; Recommended preparatory: MATH 250 and MATH 280. Continuation of CHEM 351. Quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, and new developments and trends in physical chemistry. (Offered Spring semester)

CHEM 352L. Physical Chemistry II Lab (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 352. Laboratory course for CHEM 352. Selected experiments illustrating some of the important concepts covered in CHEM 352. One 3-hour lab per week. (Offered Spring semester.)

CHEM 365. Introduction to Biochemistry (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 235/L. A course designed for non-science majors, describing chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, hormones, etc. 3 hours of lecture per week. No credit for Science or Engineering majors, except for certain options in Biology; consult your major department.

CHEM 365L. Introduction to Biochemistry Lab (1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 235/L. Corequisite: CHEM 365. A course designed for non-science majors, describing chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, hormones, etc. One 3-hour laboratory per week. No credit for Science or Engineering majors except for certain options in Biology; consult your major department.

CHEM 401. Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 351. Principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure; survey of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic system. Available for graduate credit. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 401L. Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 401. Synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Synthetic techniques important to inorganic chemistry, such as electrochemical synthesis, autoclave reactions and inert atmosphere techniques, as well as inorganic spectroscopic techniques. Available for graduate credit. One 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 411. Synthesis (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Preparation of inorganic and organic compounds and their identification, using advanced methods. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture; two 3-hour lab periods per week.

CHEM 422/L. Chemical Analysis II and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: CHEM 321. Corequisite: CHEM 422L. Continuation of CHEM 321, with special emphasis on polarography and voltammetry, chromatography, spectrophotometric methods, mass spectrometry and radiochemical methods. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture per week; two 3-hour lab periods per week.

CHEM 433. Organic Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Identification of organic compounds using advanced spectrometric techniques that include modern NMR methods. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture; two 3-hour lab periods per week.

CHEM 451. Modern Physical Chemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Selected topics in modern physical chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure and spectra, the chemical bond, inter-molecular forces, interaction of matter with fields and the solid state. Available for graduate credit. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 461/L. Biochemistry I and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 321/L, CHEM 334. Corequisites: CHEM 461L. The first part of a two-semester biochemistry lecture series designed for biochemistry majors that includes study of protein structure and function, enzyme mechanisms, biological membranes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP generation and lipid metabolism. Lab includes experiments involving acid/base chemistry, peptide analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, protein isolation and characterization, and …

CHEM 462/L. Biochemistry II and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 461 or instructor consent. Corequisites: CHEM 462L. Continuation of CHEM 461, the second part of a two-semester biochemistry lecture series designed for biochemistry majors, including discussion of photosynthesis, amino acid metabolism, lipoproteins, metabolic interrelationships and regulation, information transfer and signal transduction. Lab includes experiments involving gel filtration, ATP biosynthesis, isolation and characterization of …

CHEM 464. Principles of Biochemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Corequisite (for Chemistry majors and minors): CHEM 464L. Properties and metabolism of the constituents of biological systems. Mechanism of enzyme action, energy relations in biological systems. 3 hours lecture per week. Available for graduate credit.

CHEM 464L. Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Corequisite: CHEM 464. Recommended Preparatory: CHEM 321/L. Experiments involving acid/base chemistry, peptide structure, spectrophotometric analysis, biomolecule purification and enzymology designed to develop the ability to collect, analyze and report experimental biochemical information. One 3-hour lab per week. Available for graduate credit.

CHEM 465. Topics in Biochemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 462 or instructor consent. Seminar in major recent developments in biochemistry. Available for graduate credit. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 495A-C. Directed Undergraduate Research (1-3)

Prerequisite: One course beyond CHEM 102 in the area related to the research. Interested students should make arrangements with the department as soon as possible, preferably during the previous semester. For students of advanced rank and proven competence in chemistry. Program of original independent research, culminating in a written report, carried out under the direction …

CHEM 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

See Independent Study under courses of study.

CHEM 500. Chemistry Teaching Assistant Workshop (1)

Prerequisite: Graduate student status. An instructional improvement workshop for graduate teaching assistants. Participants learn by presenting short videotaped lessons to the class and by receiving feedback on the basic skills demonstrated in the lesson. Participants are presented with a basic model for clear chemistry lab teaching and are taught effective feedback techniques. (Credit/No Credit only)

CHEM 502. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 401. Study of molecular structure of inorganic compounds; coordination chemistry; kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic reactions. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 522. Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 422/L or approval of the instructor. An advanced-level discussion of topics in analytical chemistry with particular emphasis on separation sciences and optical spectroscopy. Topics that will be discussed in detail are fluorescence, phosphorescence, phase and distribution equilibria, extraction techniques, electrophoresis and micro-fluid separation. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 531. Survey of Organic Reactions (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Detailed survey of the ranges of application and mechanisms of organic oxidations, reductions, additions, eliminations, condensations and degradations with specific reference to their applications to problems of synthesis and structure elucidation. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 534. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 334, CHEM 352. Physical and physiochemical consideration of organic chemistry. Kinetics, configuration. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 541. Environmental Chemistry I (2)

Prerequisites: CHEM 422/L or instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 541L. Comprehensive survey of the Earth’s natural processes in atmosphere, water and soil, and the chemical aspects of the impact that human activities have produced in the natural environment. Also, topics such as energy resources, hazardous waste management/treatment and risk assessment are discussed. 2 hours lecture …

CHEM 541L. Environmental Chemistry I Lab (2)

Prerequisites: CHEM 422/L or instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 541. Application of chemical and instrumental methods for the identification and quantification of inorganic and organic contaminants present in water, soil and air samples using E.P.A.-approved methodologies and protocols. Two 3-hour lab periods per week.

CHEM 543. Chemistry of Energy (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 401 or instructor permission. An in-depth analysis of the underlying chemical principles related to energy production, storage, transport, and conversion. The course will focus on recent developments in the literature on alternative energy strategies with an emphasis on solar (photovoltaic, concentrated solar power, thermal energy storage) and electrochemical (batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors) based …

CHEM 551. Chemical Thermodynamics (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Thermodynamic properties of pure systems, mixtures, electrochemical systems, surface phases and systems under the influence of external fields; equilibria and thermodynamics of chemical reactions. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 552. Quantum Chemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Elements of wave mechanics and the application to chemical problems. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 553. Chemical Kinetics (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Critical consideration of the kinetics of reactions in gaseous and condensed phases, experimental methods, treatment of data, catalysis and chain reactions. Recent developments in the theory of reaction rates. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 554. Macromolecules (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Physical chemistry of high molecular weight compounds, ultracentrifuge, electro-phoresis, light scattering. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 555/L. Computational Molecular and Materials Chemistry and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: CHEM 351/CHEM 351L or Graduate Standing in Chemistry/Biochemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 555L. Recommended Preparatory: CHEM 333/L, CHEM 352/CHEM 352L, CHEM 401/CHEM 401L. This course is designed for advanced chemistry students to acquire in-depth understanding of the chemistry and physics of molecular and extended solid materials and to gain basic skills in calculating their electronic structures, …

CHEM 564. Bio-Organic Chemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334, CHEM 464 or approval of advisor and instructor. Application of physical organic methods to solution of structural and mechanistic problems in biochemistry.

CHEM 565. Receptor Biochemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 464 or CHEM 461. Study of the kinetics, structural requirements and signal-transduction mechanisms of receptor-ligand interactions. 3 hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 566. DNA-Protein Interactions (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 464, or CHEM 461 and CHEM 462. An advanced biochemistry course with an in-depth study of the biochemistry of DNA-protein interactions. The course focuses on subfields of biochemistry that involve direct physical interaction between DNA and proteins, including DNA repair, mutagenesis, replication, transcription, translation, RNA interference, DNA packaging and chromosomal maintenance. 3 hours …

CHEM 567. Investigating Protein Structure and Function (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 461 or CHEM 464 (or equivalent); Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 567L; Recommended Preparatory: CHEM 352. The course covers advanced concepts in protein structure and function relationships focusing specifically on current biophysical approaches to problems in protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, allosteric effects, protein motions and conformational changes, protein folding, as well as protein structure prediction …

CHEM 567L. Investigating Protein Structure and Function Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 461 or CHEM 464 (or equivalent); Required Corequisite: CHEM 567; Recommended Preparatory: CHEM 352. Application of biophysical methods to characterize protein structure and function. The lab will involve both hands-on collection and analysis of data from advanced instruments, as well as computational characterization and simulation of proteins.

CHEM 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (1-3)

Prerequisites: Advisor and instructor consent. Specialized topics from a concentrated field of current interest presented at an advanced level. Since the topic chosen is different each semester, students may repeat this course with approval.

CHEM 691. Literature Seminar (1)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Oral reports by graduate students on important topics from the current literature in chemistry.

CHEM 692. Thesis Seminar (1)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Oral reports by graduate students on the results of their thesis research. Before presenting the report, students must submit a rough draft of their M.S. thesis to their graduate thesis committee and to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry as a whole.

CHEM 696A-C. Directed Graduate Research (1-7)

Prerequisites: Classified status; Consent of a faculty member who will serve as thesis advisor. Program of research conducted under the direction of the thesis advisor in an area of interest to the student. May be repeated, but no more than 7 units are allowed toward the M.S. degree.

CHEM 698A-B. Thesis (1-2)

Prerequisites: Classified standing; Advisor’s consent. For the M.S. degree: Thesis includes the preparation and writing of the master thesis. May be repeated once, but not more than 3 units are allowed towards the M.S. degree.

CPLX 701. Mathematical Foundations for Complex Systems (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate advisor. This course provides essential mathematical tools for the study of complex systems. Topics include vector calculus, linear algebra and aspects of differential equations and partial differential equations.

CPLX 702. Physics Foundations for Complex Systems (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate advisor. This course introduces physical approaches to dealing with complex, many-body systems. Two distinct and complementary frameworks are presented: analytical mechanics and statistical physics. Core concepts include Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics, phase space, nonlinear dynamics, chaos, fractals, free energy, entropy, partition functions and statistical ensembles.

CPLX 703. Chemistry Foundations for Complex Systems (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate advisor. The first part of the course will cover nonlinear chemical kinetics, control of chemical reactions, self-assembly at microscopic and macroscopic levels, and development of new techniques for materials synthesis. In the second part, quantum chemical models for describing large systems and their interaction with the surroundings will be introduced.

CPLX 704. Biology Foundations for Complex Systems (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate advisor. The course will explore how to analyze biology from a systems-level point of view. Students will explore design principles in biology, including plasticity, exploratory behavior, weak-linkage, constraints that deconstrain, robustness, (non)optimality and evolvability.

CPLX 705. Computer Science Foundations for Complex Systems (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate advisor. Overview of computer science topics relevant to complex systems, including software development, design of algorithms, computer simulation, computer and sensor networks, social networks and agent-based systems.

CPLX 706. Engineering Foundations for Complex Systems (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate advisor. This course introduces the principles and methods of complex systems engineering. The course is organized as a progression through the systems engineering processes of analysis, design, implementation and deployment with consideration of verification and validation throughout. Case studies and guest lectures in each phase present best practice in the field …

CPLX 710A. Complex Systems I (4)

Prerequisites: Passing preliminary examination and graduate advisor consent. This course provides an overview of complex systems and describes theoretical, numerical and computational approaches to defining, analyzing and solving applied problems in complex systems.

CPLX 710B. Complex Systems II (4)

Prerequisites: CPLX 710A, passing preliminary examination and graduate advisor consent. Hands-on activities on complex systems topics. Examples of course project topics include complex networked systems (sensor networks and social networks) and agent-based modeling (genetic programming and evolutionary strategies).

CPLX 791. Research Seminar (1)

Prerequisites: Passing preliminary examination and graduate advisor consent. Advanced studies in various subjects related to complex systems through special seminars, informal group studies of special problems, or group research on complete problems for analysis and experimentation.

GEOL 101. Geology of Planet Earth (3)

Studies of the geologic materials and processes that shape our Earth and environment are explored as they relate to our everyday lives. Topics include global tectonics; earthquakes and other geologic hazards; glacial, river and coastal processes that form our landscapes; water, mineral and energy resources; and waste disposal and pollution.Students may not receive credit for …

GEOL 102. Geology of Planet Earth Lab (1)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: GEOL 100 or GEOL 101. Identification of rocks and minerals. Introduction to topographic maps and how they are used to interpret geologic processes and geologic history. Interpretation of geologic maps and data relating to earthquakes and plate tectonics. 3 hours lab, field trips. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity …

GEOL 104. Living with Earthquakes in California (3)

Not for credit in Geology major. Examines the revolution in earthquake hazard awareness that has occurred in California since the mid-1980’s when the scale of the earthquake hazard began to emerge from scientific discovery. Students will investigate the reciprocal ways in which science has informed the public, political and economic debate over the implications of …

GEOL 106LRS. Earth and Space Science for Liberal Studies Majors (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Analysis of Earth systems (atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere), the solar system and the universe. Selected topics include structure and composition of the Earth; minerals and rocks; plate tectonics; landforms and surface processes; natural hazards, such as floods, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; physical oceanography, the water cycle, …

GEOL 107. Geology Goes Hollywood (2)

Corequisite: GEOL 107L. This online lecture explores how Earth science issues that impact society are depicted in film and television and how these depictions influence the viewers’ perceptions of Earth science. Students will learn fundamental concepts of Earth science, and how to evaluate the appropriateness and accuracy of Earth science portrayed in fictional and documentary …

GEOL 107L. Geology Goes Hollywood Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOL 107. This online laboratory explores how Earth science issues that impact society are depicted in film and television and how these depictions influence the viewers’ perceptions of Earth science. Students will learn fundamental concepts of Earth science, and how to evaluate the appropriateness and accuracy of Earth science portrayed in fictional and documentary …

GEOL 110. The Fossil Record of Ancient Life on Earth (3)

Introduction to the dynamic study of the Earth’s evolution, including changes in the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. This course focusses on how these changes, woven into the fabric of geologic time, affected major groups of plants and animals, including dinosaurs and humans. Students may not receive credit for both GEOL 110 and GEOL 113. …

GEOL 112. Earth and Life Through Time Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOL 113. Course content includes introduction to fossil, relative-age relationships and construction and interpretation of maps and cross-sections that emphasize paleogeography and sedimentary rocks. 3 hours lab, 1-day field trip. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided GEOL 113 is also completed.)

GEOL 113. Earth and Life Through Time (2)

Corequisite: GEOL 112. An exploration of evolution, environmental change, and the history of life on Earth using the fossil record over the last 4.6 billion years. Particular emphasis will be placed on the coevolution of organisms and Earth surface conditions through time. Students may not receive credit for both GEOL 113 and GEOL 110. (Available …

GEOL 117. Geological Disasters (2)

Corequisite: GEOL 117L. This lecture and lab combination explores the hazards associated with geological processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and flooding. Students will learn fundamental scientific concepts, evaluate risks posed by natural hazards, and assess potential mitigation strategies. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing …

GEOL 117L. Geological Disasters Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOL 117. This lecture and lab combination explores the hazards associated with geological processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and flooding. Students will learn fundamental scientific concepts, evaluate risks posed by natural hazards, and assess potential mitigation strategies. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity. Students satisfy the B1 Physical Science requirement by completing …

GEOL 122. The World Ocean (3)

Introduction to the oceans. Evolution of the ocean basins, their environment and resources. Aspects of biological, chemical, geological and physical oceanography. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing GEOL 123.)

GEOL 123. World Ocean Lab (1)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: GEOL 122. Introduction to oceanographic data, its collection and interpretation. 3 hours lab, field trips. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided GEOL 122 is also completed.)

GEOL 300. Environmental Geology (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the relationship between humans and the Earth and the application of geology to environmental problems. Topics include geological hazards, pollution, mineral and energy resources, land use planning and environmental impact. 3 hours lecture, field trips. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.)

GEOL 301. Environmental Geology Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: GEOL 300. An introduction to geologic materials and processes as they are applicable to the human environment. Included are practical exercises on rocks, minerals, geologic maps and water, mineral and energy resources. Earthquake, volcanic, landslide and flood hazard evaluations are also performed. 3 hours …

GEOL 303. Communicating Geoscience (2)

Prerequisite: Any 3-unit 100-level GEOL course. Scientific discoveries are only useful to the community if they are shared clearly, concisely, and convincingly. Scientists use different communications strategies based on the audience they are addressing, the purpose of their communication, and the mediums available to them. This course introduces students to a range of written, visual, …

GEOL 306/L. Earth Materials and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Any 3-unit 100-level GEOL course. Corequisite: GEOL 306L. Recommended Preparatory: Any 100-level CHEM course. Study of the origin and distribution of the solid materials that comprise the Earth. Students will learn the physical and optical properties of minerals and use those properties to perform mineral and rock identifications. The course will emphasize placing earth …

GEOL 307/L. Petrology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: GEOL 306/L, CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L. Corequisite: GEOL 307L. Introduction to the classification and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks, including the optical properties of minerals. Lab study of these rocks utilizing hand-specimen characteristics and the petrographic microscope. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips, fee required.

GEOL 309/L. Earth Tectonics and Structure and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Any 3-unit 100-level GEOL course. Corequisite: GEOL 309L. Study of the basic principles of plate tectonics and structural geology that provide ways to interpret Earth’s interior. Topics will include the basics of plate tectonic theory, stress and strain, classification of structures, and structural-tectonic evolution of modern and ancient plate boundaries. 3 hours lecture, 3 …

GEOL 310/L. Advanced Structural Geology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: GEOL 309/L. Corequisite: GEOL 310L. Study of rock deformational processes and resulting structures in the Earth’s crust. Lab work emphasizes the use of graphic methods to assist in the geometric and kinematic interpretation of rock structures. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trip, fee required.

GEOL 313. Field Methods (2)

Corequisite: GEOL 306/L. Study of and practice in techniques and methods of geologic field studies, including note taking, mapping, analysis of geologic history and structures, geologic illustration, and report writing. 3 hours per week and approximately 6 days of fieldwork (including overnight weekend trips). Fee required.

GEOL 314/L. Earth Systems and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Any 3-unit 100-level GEOL course. Corequisite: GEOL 314L. This course focuses on the four Earth systems (geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere) and interactions between these systems and humankind. Major course topics include water and energy resources, global climate change, sedimentary processes at the Earth’s surface, and how the fossil record is used to understand …

GEOL 324. The World of the Dinosaurs (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course is a study of dinosaurs and the world in which they lived from the time of their first appearance to their extinction. The evolutionary patterns exhibited by dinosaurs are explored via an examination of their spatial and temporal distribution through time, considering connections to the …

GEOL 327. Geoforensics (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. A comprehensive introduction to the application of geoscience to criminal investigations and forensic problems solving. The course explores the use of geological evidence (rocks and minerals, soils, geochemistry, etc.) to aid in forensic investigation. Students review case studies in criminal justice, national security and environmental contamination. (Available …

GEOL 341/L. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: GEOL 314/L. Corequisite: 341L. Introduction to the processes of sedimentation; the texture, composition and classification of sedimentary rocks; depositional environments; and stratigraphic sequences and correlation techniques. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips, fee required.

GEOL 344. California Geology (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Investigations of aspects of California geology. California-related topics may include: plate tectonic history, earthquakes, geologic hazards, geology of national parks, climate record and hydrogeology. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.) (IC)

GEOL 406LRS. Liberal Studies Science Experience Capstone (1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 100, BIOL 101 or BIOL 102; PHSC 170; GEOL 106LRS or GEOG 106LRS. This laboratory course serves as a culminating science experience for Liberal Studies majors in the Pre-Credential and ITEP options. An interdisciplinary blend of biology, physics, chemistry, and Earth and space sciences from lower division courses will be integrated into the …

GEOL 430A/B. Summer Field Geology (2-2)

Prerequisites: GEOL 310/L and GEOL 341/L. A two-course sequence on advanced observation and collection of geologic field data and the construction of geologic maps, cross-sections and stratigraphic sections. Students must enroll in both A and B courses during the same summer session, and fieldwork for both courses is completed during the first four weeks of the session. …

GEOL 464/L. Applied Geophysics and Lab (3/1)

Corequisite: GEOL 464L. Preparatory: GEOL 313, GEOL 307; MATH 150A or MATH 255A; or instructor consent. Introduction to the basic principles and techniques of geophysics. Includes study of seismic reflection and refraction, earthquakes, gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, ground penetrating radar and global positioning system satellites. Available for graduate credit. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field …

GEOL 490. Senior Capstone (3)

Prerequisites: GEOL 303, GEOL 306, GEOL 309, GEOL 313, GEOL 314; B.S. Geology majors only. Students engage in a semester-long case study problem where a community must make a decision about how to effectively use a geologically complex site such as an eroding coastline, a contaminated industrial site, or a landfill facing landslides (topics change …

GEOL 497. Research Methods and Design (1)

Preparatory: Junior or senior standing; Instructor consent. Students are advised and guided in research methods and design. Students use critical reasoning and the scientific method to develop and write their own research proposal to execute the project for their senior thesis. The written proposal is patterned after those required by the National Science Foundation.

GEOL 498. Senior Thesis (3)

Prerequisites: GEOL 497; Instructor consent. Following approval by the thesis advisor of a written proposal, the student completes an original research project in consultation with the faculty advisor. Upon completion of the research, the student will submit the written thesis to the advisor and give an oral presentation to the Department of Geological Sciences.

GEOL 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

See Independent Study under Courses of Study. Cannot be used for General Education credit.

GEOL 501. Teaching and Learning About the Natural World (3)

An overview of science education research methodologies and findings that have an impact on science classrooms at all levels. Introduces practical techniques to identify students’ prior knowledge and construct effective educational experiences that help them build on that knowledge. Topics include: Common misconceptions; novice v. expert thinking; attention span with 21st century learners; developing spatial …

GEOL 510. Advanced Topics in Paleontology (3)

Preparatory: GEOL 341, GEOL 351, GEOL 508. Seminars in various topics in invertebrate paleontology, such as biostratigraphy, paleoecology, functional morphology, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. 3 hours seminar.

GEOL 521. Sedimentary Environments (3)

Preparatory: GEOL 341 or instructor consent. Study of the characteristics of modern sedimentary environments and how these characteristics are used to recognize ancient sedimentary environments. 3 hours seminar.

GEOL 523/L. Sedimentation and Tectonics and Lab (2/2)

Corequisite: GEOL 523L. Preparatory: GEOL 310, GEOL 335, GEOL 341; or instructor consent. Lecture topics include a review of plate tectonic theory, followed by detailed discussions of the sedimentary and structural histories of basins from assorted tectonic settings. Labs include study of thin sections of sediments and sedimentary rocks, particularly clastic sedimentary rocks from basin …

GEOL 532/L. Microtectonics and Lab (3/1)

Preparatory: GEOL 307/L, GEOL 310/L. This course will emphasize the microstructural and textural analysis of metamorphic rocks in thin section to aid in the interpretation of tectonic evolution. Topics include identification of igneous and metamorphic assemblages; identification of textures and microstructures; identification of deformation mechanisms at the grain- and crystal-lattice scale; secondary foliation and lineation …

GEOL 533/L. Geology of Earthquakes (2/1)

Preparatory: GEOL 310. Lecture topics will include a review of plate tectonics, rock mechanics, seismology, tectonic geodesy, paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology and seismic hazard assessment. Detailed discussions will include study of recent major earthquakes that have occurred in strike-slip, thrust-reverse, megathrust (subduction zone) and normal-fault tectonic settings. Labs will include study of air photos, geologic maps, …

GEOL 536/L. Igneous Petrology and Lab (3/1)

Corequisite: GEOL 536L. Preparatory: GEOL 307. Study of the more important kinds of igneous rocks, emphasizing distribution, origin, causes of compositional variation and relation to tectonic factors. Representative rock suites and computer techniques are studied in the lab. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips.

GEOL 546/L. Geodynamics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: MATH 255A, GEOL 101. Corequisite: GEOL 546L. Recommended Preparatory: MATH 280, GEOL 307. This course provides fundamental concepts necessary for understanding of the interior and surficial processes of the Earth and other planets through quantitative analysis of elastic plate flexure, heat flow, heat production, convection, geophysical fluid dynamics, gravity, surface stresses, and rheology and …

GEOL 548/L. Seismology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Corequisite: GEOL 548L. Recommended Preparatory: GEOL 101, MATH 280. This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts in seismology and the study of elastic waves in the solid earth. Topics include: seismic wave equation, stress/strain theory, ray theory, tomography, reflection seismology, body waves, surface waves, source theory, anisotropy, inverse …

GEOL 551. Quaternary Geochronology (3)

Prerequisites: GEOL 207L, CHEM 101, PHYS 100A. The course examines recent advances in Quaternary geochronology. Topics include defining the time period, common landforms and deposits, oxygen isotope stratigraphy, and geochronologic methods including radiocarbon (14C) dating, Uranium series disequilibrium, cosmogenic nuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl), luminescence dating, and magnetostratigraphy. Lecture 3 hours, 1 field trip.

GEOL 552. Geochemistry (3)

Preparatory: GEOL 307 or instructor consent. Application of the principles of chemistry to geological problems. Topics include nucleosynthesis, origin of the solar system, elemental distribution, and stable and unstable isotopes. 3 hours lecture.

GEOL 553. Analytical Geochemistry (1)

Preparatory: CHEM 102; GEOL 307; or instructor consent. Instrumental analysis of rocks and minerals. Includes theory and practical application of X-ray spectrography, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, mass-spectrometry and electron microprobe. 3 hours lab.

GEOL 570VLA. Volcanology (3)

Preparatory: GEOL 307, GEOL 341; or consent of instructor. Course topics include styles of volcanic eruptions, volcanic landforms, physicochemical controls on eruptions, characteristics and interpretation of volcanic deposits, emplacement of pyroclastic density currents, volcanic hazards and impacts of volcanism on Earth’s environment. 3 hours lecture.

GEOL 575/L. Hydrogeology and Lab (3/1)

Corequisite: GEOL 575L. Preparatory: Upper division standing in Geology; Formal geologic field reports, including geologic maps and cross-sections, one for GEOL 430A and one for GEOL 430B. Students must enroll in both courses during the same Summer session. Available for graduate credit.

GEOL 580/L. Engineering Geology and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: GEOL 580L. Preparatory: Upper division standing in Geology or consent of instructor. Application of geologic factors to such engineering projects as residential developments, buildings, dams, bridges, tunnels and waste-disposal sites. Topics include an introduction to soil mechanics, groundwater in engineering geology, landslides, earthquakes, subsidence, waste disposal, and engineering geologic site investigations, maps and reports. …

GEOL 590. Literature Seminar (1)

Preparatory: Senior undergraduate or graduate standing in Geological Sciences. Students will make oral presentations of and lead discussions about current research literature in geological sciences.

GEOL 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Geological Sciences (1-3)

Preparatory: Instructor consent. Experimental topics in the geological sciences with the course content to be determined. Topics may be repeated with advisor approval.

GEOL 694. Graduate Thesis Research Design (1)

Instruction and practice in the process required to construct a research proposal, culminating in the development of a graduate-level research proposal suitable as a master’s thesis project.

GEOL 696C. Directed Graduate Research (3)

Directed Graduate Research

GEOL 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)

Thesis or Graduate Project

GEOL 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

See Independent Study under Courses of Study. Cannot be used for General Education credit.

MATH 091A. Diagnostic for Mathematics (1)

Corequisite: Enrollment in MATH 196QR or MATH 196S.  This is a self-paced diagnostic and preparation for General Education Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning. Credit will not apply toward the baccalaureate degree but will apply as 1 unit of University credit. The course covers topics in basic arithmetic and elementary algebra. (Cross-listed with ESM 091A.)

MATH 091B. Support Course for GE Mathematics (1)

Corequisite: Enrollment in MATH 102, but only for students who qualify for MATH 102 by receiving a passing grade in MATH 196S or equivalent. This is a credit/no credit pre-baccalaureate math class designed to support students in algebra intensive GE Math courses. It provides just in time remediation just prior to each of the linked …

MATH 102. Pre-Calculus I (3)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 102L. A preparation for the algebra necessary for calculus. This course is intended for computer science, engineering, mathematics, and natural science majors. It builds on student’s familiarity with linear, quadratic, and rational expressions to achieve fluent proficiency …

MATH 102L. Pre-Calculus I Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 102. All students in MATH 102 are encouraged to enroll in this course. This is a Credit/No Credit hybrid enrichment laboratory for students in MATH 102. This course will include a self-paced, modular online component. 2 hours lab per week. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 103. Mathematical Methods for Business (3)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 103L. Concepts and applications of algebra and calculus to business. Topics include functions, systems of equations, matrices, the derivative and business-related topics in calculus. (Available for General Education, Basic Skills B4 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning.)

MATH 103L. Mathematics for Business Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: Conditionally prepared for MATH 103. Corequisite: MATH 103. This self-paced, module-based laboratory is designed to give students additional exposure to the applications of college algebra to business and economics beyond what can be done in lecture. The additional hands-on problem-solving skills learned in this class enhance the lecture experience and strengthen the skills necessary …

MATH 104. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (3)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 104L. Rectangular and polar coordinates; trigonometric functions, identities and equations; inverse trigonometric functions; conic sections; complex numbers. Not open to students who have credit in MATH 103, MATH 105 or MATH 106.

MATH 104L. Trigonometry Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 104. All students in MATH 104 are encouraged to enroll in this course. This is a Credit/No Credit hybrid enrichment laboratory for students in MATH 104. This course will include a self-paced, modular online component. 2 hours lab per week. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 105. Pre-Calculus II (5)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 105L. A preparation for the trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions used in calculus. This course is intended for computer science, engineering, mathematics, and natural science majors. This course builds on student’s familiarity with exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric expressions …

MATH 105L. Pre-Calculus II Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 105. All students in MATH 105 are encouraged to enroll in this course. This is a Credit/No Credit hybrid enrichment laboratory for students in MATH 105. This course will include a self-paced, modular online component. 3 hours lab per week. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 106. Mathematical Foundations for Non-Calculus Physics (5)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Mathematics applicable to problems in non-calculus based physics. Sets, inequalities; functions and graphs: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric; introduction to vectors, angular velocity, and parametric equations. This course is not open to students who have credit in MATH 105 or MATH 255A. (Available for General Education, Basic Skills B4 Mathematics and Quantitative …

MATH 131. Mathematical Ideas (3)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S or equivalent. General Education course intended to acquaint the student with basic mathematical ideas. (Available for General Education, Basic Skills B4 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning.)

MATH 140. Introductory Statistics (4)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S or equivalent. Methods for displaying, describing and producing data. Normal distribution. Correlation and regression. Sampling distributions and probability. Statistical inference for means and proportions. Hybrid (part online) or fully online sections only. (Cross-listed with MATH 140BUS, MATH …

MATH 140BUS. Introductory Statistics for Business (4)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S or equivalent. Methods for displaying, describing and producing data. Normal distribution. Correlation and regression. Sampling distributions and probability. Statistical inference for means and proportions. Applications to business. Open to students in the College of Business and Economics. …

MATH 140SCI. Introductory Statistics for STEM (4)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S or equivalent. Methods for displaying, describing and producing data. Normal distribution. Correlation and regression. Sampling distributions and probability. Statistical inference for means and proportions. Applications to STEM fields. Open to all students except those in the College …

MATH 141/L. Essentials of Statistics and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics or concurrent enrollment in MATH 091S. Basic statistical concepts and reasoning, including methods for displaying, summarizing, interpreting, and producing data. The normal model and variability in random samples. Statistical inference for means and proportions. The linear model: correlation and regression. This course is intended for students majoring in …

MATH 150A. Calculus I (5)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared or who transfer the equivalent of MATH 105 or both MATH 102 and MATH 104 must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 150AL. Limits, derivatives, and applications of differentiation. Definite and indefinite integrals. The fundamental theorem of calculus and applications of integration. (Available …

MATH 150AL. Calculus I Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 150A or MATH 255A. All students in MATH 150A and MATH 255A are encouraged to enroll in this course. This is a Credit/No Credit hybrid enrichment laboratory for students in MATH 150A and MATH 255A. This course will include a self-paced, modular online component. 3 hours …

MATH 150B. Calculus II (5)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 150BL. Techniques of integration and improper integrals. Sequences and series. Power series and Taylor polynomials. Parametric and polar coordinates. Vectors and solid geometry.

MATH 150BL. Calculus II Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 150B or MATH 255B. All students in MATH 150B and MATH 255B are encouraged to enroll in this course. This is a Credit/No Credit hybrid enrichment laboratory for students in MATH 150B and MATH 255B. This course will include a self-paced, modular online component. 3 …

MATH 210. Basic Number Concepts (3)

Prerequisites: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S or equivalent. Language of sets, systems of numeration, nature of numbers and fundamentals of operations, relations and functions, domain of integers, and field of rational and real numbers. Designed primarily for students intending to teach in elementary …

MATH 211. Statistics and Probability for Elementary and Middle School Teachers (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 210 with a grade of “C” or better. Univariate and bivariate data analysis; probability and probability distributions; design of studies and concepts of inferential statistics; applications to procedures used to evaluate teaching and learning. Not available for credit toward a Mathematics major or minor.

MATH 250. Calculus III (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. Continuation of MATH 150B. Solid analytic geometry and space curves. Partial differentiation and applications. Multiple integrals. Line integrals and independence of path. Vector calculus including the divergence theorem and Stokes’ theorem.

MATH 255A. Calculus for the Life Sciences I (3)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 255AL. Knowledge of trigonometry is assumed. First semester of a brief course in calculus. Topics include calculus of functions of one real variable, techniques of differentiation, applications to graphing, optimization problems, and an introduction to integration. …

MATH 255AL. Calculus for the Life Sciences I Lab (1)

Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 255A. All students in MATH 255A are encouraged to enroll in this lab. This course will include a self-paced, modular outline component. 3 lab hours per week. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 255B. Calculus for the Life Sciences II (3)

Prerequisites: Listed in Table 1. Students who are conditionally prepared must have credit for or concurrently enroll in MATH 255BL. Second semester of a brief course in calculus. Topics include techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, applications of calculus in probability, elements of multivariable calculus, and linear algebra. Applications to life sciences are emphasized. Not …

MATH 255BL. Calculus for the Life Sciences II Lab (1)

Required for all conditionally prepared students enrolled in MATH 255B. All students in MATH 255B are encouraged to enroll in this course. This course will include a self-paced, modular online component. 3 lab hours per week. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 262. Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, vector spaces and linear transformations, as well as introduction to inner products on Rn and spectral theorem for symmetric matrices.

MATH 280. Applied Differential Equations (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 250. First order equations. Explicit solution methods, existence and uniqueness for initial value problems. Higher order linear equations. Undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters. Laplace transforms and transform solution methods. Linear first-order systems. Emphasis on engineering applications. Not …

MATH 310. Basic Concepts of Geometry (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 210 with a grade of “C” or better. Second course for students intending to teach in elementary or junior high school. Geometry as a system; congruence and similarity through construction with straightedge and compass; transformational geometry; the nature of measurement, precision and accuracy. Not available for credit toward the major or …

MATH 310L. Basic Concepts of Geometry Lab (1)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 310. Problem solving using models and simulation in mathematics appropriate for the elementary-school classroom. 2 hours of activities per week. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 311. Basic Geometric Concepts (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 210 and MATH 310 with grades of “C” or better, or instructor consent. Continuation of the investigation of elementary geometry begun in MATH 310. Topics selected from topology, motion geometry, metric geometry, geometry as a mathematical system, absolute geometry, Euclidean geometry and non-Euclidean geometry. Not available for credit toward the Mathematics …

MATH 312. Basic Algebraic Concepts (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 210 and MATH 310 with grades of “C” or better, or instructor consent. Topics selected from: abstract algebra and applied algebra using elementary mathematical models. Not available for credit toward the Mathematics major or minor.

MATH 320. Foundations of Higher Mathematics (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. The goal of this course is to help students transition from a primarily computational mode of doing mathematics to a more conceptual mode. The emphasis will be on proofs, which are taught in the context of elementary number theory, combinatorics and analysis; the …

MATH 326. Discrete Mathematics (3)

Prerequisites: ECE 320 or PHIL 230; Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. Propositional calculus, predicate calculus, set algebra, relations, functions, mappings, fields and number systems.

MATH 331. Mathematical Explorations (3)

Prerequisites: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics, or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S. Completion of the lower division writing requirement; Upper division standing. A course designed to give students an appreciation of the diversity of mathematics and the spirit in which it is employed in various applications. The character and …

MATH 340. Introductory Probability (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. Sample spaces, probability rules, independence, conditional probability, Bayes Theorem, discrete and continuous random variables and distributions (e.g., binomial, Poisson, geometric, normal, exponential, uniform), expectation, moment generating functions, joint distributions and central limit theorem.

MATH 341. Applied Statistics I (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150B with a grade of “C” or better. Introduction to the practice of statistics, emphasizing the role of probability. Includes basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, expectation and variance, sample surveys and experiments, displaying and summarizing data, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, inference for proportions, chi-square test and least squares …

MATH 351. Differential Equations (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 250 and MATH 262 with a grade of “C” or better. Not open to students who have credit for MATH 280. First-order equations and explicit solution methods. The Picard-Lindelöf existence and uniqueness theorem. Higher order linear equations. Undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters. Power series solutions. Linear systems and eigenvector methods. Linearization …

MATH 360. Abstract Algebra I (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 262 and MATH 320 with a grade of “C” or better. Survey course in abstract algebra. Introduction to groups, rings, fields and vector spaces.

MATH 366. Combinatorics (3)

Corequisite: MATH 320 or MATH 326. This is a one-semester introduction to combinatorics. Topics include enumerative combinatorics (inclusion-exclusion, generating functions, Polya’s Theorem, etc.) and combinatorial structures (graphs, designs, etc.).

MATH 370. Foundations of Geometry (3)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 320. One of the goals of this course is to help students write rigorous proofs of results of plane Euclidean geometry. It is also expected that students visualize and develop geometric intuition through the use of dynamic geometry software. The content includes history, axiomatic structure and theorems of plane Euclidean geometry, …

MATH 382/L. Introduction to Scientific Computing and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: MATH 262. This course gives students an introduction to basic numerical techniques and to programming using some of the common software packages used in mathematics. Students apply these techniques in projects from different branches of mathematics. (This course does not replace a rigorous course in numerical analysis.) 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

MATH 391. Field Experience in the Mathematics of the Public Schools (2)

Prerequisites: Multiple Subject Candidates—MATH 210 and MATH 310 or corequisite with MATH 310. Single Subject Candidates—MATH 150A, MATH 150B; Junior standing. Field experience course designed to give the prospective teacher an appreciation of a quality mathematics program in public schools. Requirements include 45 hours of participation in an assigned school and regular group meetings to discuss …

MATH 440A. Mathematical Statistics I (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 262 and MATH 340 with a grade of “C” or better. Point estimation, bias and mean squared error, optimality theory for estimates, maximum likelihood estimation, confidence intervals, test of hypotheses, power, and optimality theory for tests. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 440B. Mathematical Statistics II (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 440A with a grade of “C” or better. Chi-square goodness of fit tests, simple and multiple linear regression, 1- and 2-way analysis of variance, and statistical analysis using the computer. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 442A-Z. Topics in Mathematical Statistics (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 340 with a grade of “C” or better, or MATH 440A with a grade of “C” or better. Topics selected from statistics and/or probability, such as nonparametric statistics, multivariate statistics, experimental design, decision theory and advanced probability theory.

MATH 444. Statistical Modeling (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 340. This course will cover the fundamental concepts of statistical model building, including inference, applied linear regression, multiple regression, prediction and variable selection, nonlinear and nonparametric regression, principal component analysis and factor analysis. Software and coding will be used to apply the theory to examples and real data sets, but no previous coding …

MATH 445. Statistical Foundations to Machine Learning (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 444 or MATH 440A. This course will cover concepts of linear models and prediction models including generalized linear models, supervised and unsupervised learning such as classification techniques and clustering. It also includes missing data techniques and concepts of time series analysis. Software and coding will be used to apply the theory to examples …

MATH 450A. Advanced Calculus I (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 320 with a grade of “C” or better. Topics include the real number system, sequences and series of numbers, limits and continuity of functions, differentiation and Riemann integration of functions of one real variable.

MATH 450B. Advanced Calculus II (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 450A with a grade of “C” or better. Topics include sequences and series of functions, the Heine-Borel Theorem, continuous functions, differentiation of multi-variable functions, and the Inverse and Implicit Function Theorems. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 455. Complex Variables (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 450A with a grade of “C” or better. Complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, Cauchy’s Theorem, power series, calculus of residues and conformal mappings. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 460. Abstract Algebra II (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 360 with a grade of “C” or better. Second course in abstract algebra. Group theory, rings and modules, and field extensions. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 462. Advanced Linear Algebra (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 262 and MATH 320 with a grade of “C” or better. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 360. This course covers vector spaces and linear transformations from a more theoretical perspective than that covered in MATH 262. The course begins with a review of abstract vector spaces, including the invariance of dimension …

MATH 463. Number Theory (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 320 with a grade of “C” or better. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 360. Euclidean algorithm and the unique factorization theorem, congruences, primitive roots and indices, quadratic residues and the law of quadratic reciprocity, and distribution of primes. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 480. Partial Differential Equations (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 351 with a grade of “C” or better, or MATH 280 with a grade of “C” or better. Orthogonal functions, Laplace’s equation, Poisson’s equation, Bessel’s equation, self-adjoint operators, Sturm-Liouville theory, Fourier series, separation of variables applied to the heat equation and wave equation, nonhomogeneous problems, Green’s functions for time-independent problems, and …

MATH 481A. Numerical Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: COMP 110/L; Completion of MATH 262 with a grade of “C” or better. Techniques of applied mathematics, solution of equations, interpolation, numerical integration and numerical solution of differential equations. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 482. Combinatorial Algorithms (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 150B and MATH 262 with a grade of “C” or better; Some computer programming experience. Computer-oriented study of seminumerical and non-numerical algorithms. Sorting, tree searching, generation of combinatorial structures, algorithm proof techniques, best algorithms and programming complexity. Available for graduate credit.

MATH 483. Mathematical Modeling (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 340 and MATH 351 with a grade of “C” or better. Applications of mathematical techniques to solve selected problems in ecology, biology, economics, finance, social sciences, life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. Models discussed include deterministic, stochastic, optimization, static and dynamic ones. Emphasis is placed on the initial phase of building …

MATH 490. Capstone Course (3)

Prerequisite: Senior standing. A course where prospective teachers see high-school level mathematics from a more advanced perspective, where there is considerably more emphasis on issues of pedagogy than in other content courses, and where students will see connections between the mathematics they have learned and some of the activities that they will themselves be engaged …

MATH 493. Undergraduate Seminar in Mathematics (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing in the major. Students will study current topics in mathematical and/or statistical literature and will prepare written summaries and give oral presentations to the class. Students will be active participants in all seminars by asking questions and providing written critiques and summaries of the presentations of other students.

MATH 494. Practical Experience in Mathematics (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing in the major. Students will gain practical experience in the profession by either participating in an internship doing mathematical/statistical work at an outside organization or by doing directed research within the department. All students are expected to work a minimum of 8 hours per week on this assignment and meet with the …

MATH 496A-Z. Experimental Topics in Modern Mathematics (3)

Prerequisites: Senior standing and instructor consent.

MATH 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

See Independent Study under courses of study.

MATH 501. Topology (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 450A. Metric spaces, topological spaces, compactness, completeness and connectedness. Introduction to function spaces, with emphasis on the uniform topology.

MATH 540. Regression Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A. General linear model in matrix form, simple and multiple regression analysis, transformations, variable selection, multicollinearity, analysis of variance, robust regression, logistic regression, principal components and factor analysis. Statistical software utilized.

MATH 541. Theoretical Statistical Inference (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 340, MATH 450A and MATH 462. Hogg-Craig Theorem, Cochran Theorem, convergence in probability and distribution, Cramer-Wold Theorem, Continuous Mapping Theorem, Weak-Law-of-Large-Numbers, Lindberg-Feller Central Limit Theorem (CLT), Lyapunov CLT, Regular Exponential families, Neyman-Factorization Criterion, the substitution principle, asymptotic relative efficiency, the method of the moments, the MLE and its asymptotic efficiency, Uniformly Minimum Variance …

MATH 542. Nonparametric Statistics (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A or MATH 541. One, two and K sample location methods, the histogram estimator, kernel density estimation, the choice of the smoothing parameter, other density estimators: orthogonal basis, penalized maximum likelihood, nonparametric regression: Nadaraya-Watson, choice of smoothing parameter, k-nn, splines, bootstrap.

MATH 543. Multivariate Statistics (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A or MATH 541. Multivariate normal distribution, multivariate data analysis, inference about a mean vector including Hotelling’s T2 and the likelihood ratio statistic, Wishart distribution, MANOVA, classification and discriminant analysis, principal components, factor analysis, canonical correlation, multidimensional scaling. Applications and use of statistical software.

MATH 544. Stochastic Processes (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 340. Markov chains, first step analysis, recurrent and transient states, stationary and limiting distributions, random walks, branching processes, Poisson and birth and death processes, renewal theory, martingales, introduction to Brownian motion and related Gaussian processes.

MATH 545. Probability Theory (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 552. Operations on sets and events, sigma algebras, probability measures, Lebesgue measure, measurable maps and random variables, independence, Borel-Cantelli lemmas, zero-one laws, integration with respect to a probability measure, convergence theorems for integral, product spaces, and Fubini’s theorem. Laws of large numbers, convergence in distribution, and the central limit theorem.

MATH 546. Time Series Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A or MATH 541. Time series, stationary and nonstationary time series models, seasonal and nonseasonal time series models, trends, ARIMA (Box-Jenkins) models, smoothing methods, estimation, diagnostic checking, forecasting techniques, spectral domain, periodogram, filtering, spectral density.

MATH 547. Categorical Data Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A or MATH 541. Inference and measures of association for categorical data, generalized linear model, logistic and Poisson regression, logit, probit and loglinear models, analysis of matched pairs.

MATH 548. Statistical Computing (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A or MATH 541. Methods for generating random variables, Monte Carlo methods, Monte Carlo Integration and variance reduction, bootstrap and jackknife, optimization and solving nonlinear equations, EM algorithms, Fisher scoring method, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods.

MATH 549A-E. Topics in Probability and Statistics (3-3)

Prerequisite: MATH 440A or MATH 541 or consent of instructor. This series will cover topics in probability and statistics not covered elsewhere in the program, as chosen by individual instructors. Up to two different courses within this series may be taken for credit. Course Title MATH 549A Bayesian Statistics MATH 549B Linear Models MATH 549C …

MATH 550. Calculus on Manifolds (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 450B. Integration of functions of several variables. Differential forms and differential manifolds, Line integrals, integration on manifolds, Stoke’s Theorem and Poincare’s Lemma.

MATH 552. Real Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 501. Introduction to measure theory and Lebesgue integration, and their application to probability theory. Monotone and dominated convergence theorems, Fubini’s theorem, Fourier analysis and Banach spaces.

MATH 560. Abstract Algebra III (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 460. Graduate course in abstract algebra. Group theory, Galois theory and other topics.

MATH 570. Differential Geometry (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 450B. The local theory of regular curves in R3 and Frenet formulas. Regular surfaces in R3, the first and second fundamental forms, Gaussian and mean curvatures, and the Egregium Gauss theorem. Geodesics and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem.

MATH 581. Numerical Methods for Linear Systems (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 462. Methods for solving large linear problems and eigenvalue problems are presented at an advanced level. Direct methods such as LU factorization, Cholesky factorization and the Least Squares method, and Iterative methods, such as the Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel, SOR and conjugate Gradient methods, are discussed in detail. Eigenvalue problems are solved via power iteration, …

MATH 582A-D. Topics in Numerical Analysis (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: MATH 581 or consent of instructor. The course will cover topics in numerical analysis which are important in many applications and which are not covered elsewhere in the program. Part A usually covers numerical methods in optimization, Part B covers numerical methods for ordinary differential equations, and Part C covers numerical solution of partial …

MATH 589. Seminar in Mathematics (1)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in the Mathematics Department. Students will read about advanced topics in the recent literature in Mathematics and report on them in a lecture. This course may be taken up to two times with the consent of the advisor. (Credit/No Credit only)

MATH 592A-D. Topics in Applied Mathematics (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: MATH 552 or consent of instructor. This course is devoted to a variety of important topics in applied mathematics that are not covered elsewhere in the program. In particular, Part A will cover the mathematical theory of partial differential equations, Part B covers mathematical optimization and operations research, and Part C covers mathematical biology. …

MATH 595A-Z. Experimental Topics (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Specialized topics from a concentrated field of current interest presented at an advanced level.

MATH 625. Advanced Mathematical Modeling (3)

Selected problems in ecology, biology, economics, finance, social sciences, life sciences, physical sciences and engineering are used to develop advanced techniques of mathematical modeling.

MATH 651A-C. Advanced Topics in Analysis, Geometry and Topology (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Advanced topics not covered in the previous classes on the subject. Part A covers topics in analysis, Part B covers topics in geometry, and Part C covers topics in topology. May be repeated with the consent of the advisor.

MATH 655. Complex Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 501, MATH 455. Topics covered include the general Cauchy theorem, power series and analytic continuation, series and product expansions, conformal mapping and the Dirichlet problem.

MATH 661A-C. Advanced Topics in Algebra, Number Theory and Discrete Mathematics (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Advanced topics not covered in the previous classes on the subject. Part A covers topics in algebra, Part B covers topics in number theory, and Part C covers other topics in discrete mathematics. May be repeated with the consent of the advisor.

MATH 662. Introduction to Commutative Algebra (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 560 or consent of instructor. Topics covered include modules, localization, integral dependence, chain conditions (Noetherian and Artinian), discrete valuation rings (DVRs) and Dedekind domains.

MATH 680A. Applied Functional Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 501, MATH 552. This two-semester sequence gives an introduction to Banach and Hilbert spaces and their applications. Fixed Point Theorems and their applications to differential and integral equations and variational principles. Adjoint and self-adjoint operators and spectral theory of linear operators. MATH 680A is a prerequisite for MATH 680B.

MATH 697A,C. Directed Comprehensive Studies (1,3)

Directed Comprehensive Studies

MATH 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

See Independent Study under courses of study.

PHSC 170. Introduction to Physical Science (4)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level Mathematics or credit in MATH 093 or MATH 196QR or MATH 196S or equivalent. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 210. Survey of the nature, modes of production and limits of scientific knowledge, as well as the major discoveries of chemistry and physics, including atomic and kinetic molecular theory, chemical …

PHYS 100A. General Physics I (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 105 or MATH 106, or a score on the Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) sufficient for entry into MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Introductory course in physics. Topics covered include mechanics, heat and sound. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing PHYS 100AL.)

PHYS 100AL. General Physics I Lab (1)

Prerequisite: MATH 105 or MATH 106, or a score on the Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) sufficient for entry into MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 100A. 3 hours per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided PHYS 100A is also completed.)

PHYS 100B. General Physics II (3)

Prerequisite: PHYS 100A. Continuation of PHYS 100A. Topics covered include electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing  PHYS 100BL.)

PHYS 100BL. General Physics II Lab (1)

Prerequisite: PHYS 100A. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 100B. 3 hours per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided PHYS 100B is also completed.)

PHYS 220A. Mechanics (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 150A or MATH 255A; Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 150B or MATH 255B. Dynamics and statics of particles and rigid bodies, harmonic vibrations and fluid mechanics. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing PHYS 220AL.)

PHYS 220AL. Mechanics Lab (1)

Prerequisite: MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 150B or MATH 255B and PHYS 220A or PHYS 225. 3 hours per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided PHYS 220A or PHYS 225 is also completed.)

PHYS 220B. Electricity and Magnetism (3)

Prerequisites: PHYS 220A; MATH 150B or MATH 255B. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 250. Electric and magnetic fields, circuit theory and electromagnetic induction. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science. Students may satisfy the B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement by completing PHYS 220BL.)

PHYS 220BL. Electricity and Magnetism Lab (1)

Prerequisites: PHYS 220A or PHYS 225; MATH 150B or MATH 255B. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 250; PHYS 220B or PHYS 226. 3 hours per week. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided PHYS 220B or PHYS 226 is also completed.)

PHYS 225. Physics I (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 150A. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 150B. First course of a sequence intended primarily for physical science majors. Calculus-based course on mechanics, fluids, waves and acoustics.

PHYS 226. Physics II (4)

Prerequisites: MATH 150B; PHYS 225. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 250. Second course of a sequence of courses intended primarily for physical science majors. Calculus-based course on electricity, magnetism and optics.

PHYS 227. Physics III (4)

Prerequisites: MATH 150B; PHYS 226 or PHYS 220B. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 280. Third course of a sequence of courses intended primarily for physical science majors. Calculus-based course on thermodynamics, waves and modern physics.

PHYS 227L. Physics III Lab (1)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 227. 3 hours per week.

PHYS 301. Analytical Mechanics I (3)

Preparatory: MATH 250, PHYS 280; PHYS 227; Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 389. Newtonian mechanics of a single particle, oscillations, systems of particles, central force motion, calculus of variations and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.

PHYS 305. Physics of Music (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course is currently taught entirely and only online. History and development of the science of sound and music, physical concepts necessary for the study of wave motion, mechanics of the construction of sound and musical tones, and basic physical principles involved in the production of sound …

PHYS 305L. Physics of Music Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: PHYS 305. This course is currently taught entirely and only online. History and development of the science of sound and music, physical concepts necessary for the study of wave motion, mechanics of the construction of sound and musical tones, and basic physical principles involved in the …

PHYS 311. Electromagnetism I (3)

Preparatory: MATH 250, MATH 280; PHYS 227; Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 389. Vector calculus, electrostatics, magnetostatics, Faradays Law and introduction to Maxwells equations.

PHYS 331. Physics of Sports (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Why do ice skaters spin faster when they pull their arms in? Why does a golf ball have dimples? How does a baseball pitcher make a ball curve? Why does a quarterback throw a spiral? These and similar questions can be understood via the laws of physics. …

PHYS 365. Experimental Physics I (2)

Preparatory: MATH 250, MATH 280; PHYS 227, PHYS 227L; Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 389. Introduction to computational physics with application to topics including dynamical systems, celestial mechanics, climate science, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, and other topics chosen by the instructor. Students are trained to use constructs, such as variables, loops, branching, and functions, in a modern …

PHYS 366. Experimental Physics II (2)

Preparatory: MATH 250, MATH 280; PHYS 227 and PHYS 227L, PHYS 389. Advanced experimental techniques in physics, with topics including optics, nuclear physics, thin-film characteristics, microwaves, data acquisition via computer interface, computer simulations, solar observations and other topics chosen by the instructor. Students are trained in advanced experimental techniques and complete two experimental modules for …

PHYS 375. Quantum Physics I (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 301, PHYS 389. Classical background, the wave function, Schroedinger equation, time development and stationary states, 1-dimensional problems, harmonic oscillator and formalism of quantum mechanics.

PHYS 376. Radiologic Physics (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B, PHYS 100BL or instructor consent. Specialized course devoted to the nature and production of X-radiation. Topics include the interaction of radiation with matter, attenuation of X-rays and the principles behind radiographic equipment and components.

PHYS 389. Mathematical Methods in Physics I (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 227; MATH 280 or MATH 351. An introduction to the mathematical methods used in junior and senior level physics courses. Topics covered include vector analysis, linear algebra, and partial differentiation.

PHYS 402. Analytical Mechanics II (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 301, PHYS 389. Noninertial reference frames, rigid body motion, coupled oscillations, nonlinear mechanics, scattering, vibrating string and Fourier analysis. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 410. Electromagnetism II (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 301, PHYS 311, PHYS 389. Maxwell’s equations and applications, electromagnetic waves, radiation and special relativity. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 420. Modern Optics (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 311, PHYS 375. Propagation of electromagnetic waves. Geometrical optics. Physical optics, including refraction, reflection, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Atomic spectroscopy. Lasers. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 431. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (4)

Preparatory: PHYS 301, PHYS 375. Laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic potentials, kinetic theory, phase transitions, equilibrium ensembles and related formalism with applications to classical and quantum systems. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 451. Quantum Physics II (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 311, PHYS 375. Hydrogen atom, angular momentum, spin, matrix representation, quantum statistics, perturbation theory and scattering. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 465. Experimental Physics III (2)

Preparatory: PHYS 365. Advanced experimental techniques in physics with topics including optics, nuclear physics, thin-film characteristics, microwaves, data acquisition via computer interface, computer simulations, solar observations and other topics chosen by the instructor. Students are trained in advanced experimental techniques and will complete two experimental modules for 2 units of credit. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours …

PHYS 466. Experimental Physics IV (2)

Preparatory: PHYS 365. Advanced experimental techniques in physics with topics including optics, nuclear physics, thin-film characteristics, microwaves, data acquisition via computer interface, computer simulations, solar observations and topics chosen by the instructor. Students are trained in advanced experimental techniques and will complete two experimental modules for 2 units of credit. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours …

PHYS 480. Introduction to Solid State Physics (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 311, PHYS 375. Structure of crystals; electron theory of metals; theory of semiconductors; and mechanical, electrical and magnetic behavior of substances in the solid state. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 489. Mathematical Methods in Physics II (3)

Prerequisite: PHYS 389 or graduate standing; Preparatory: MATH 380, PHYS 375 (may be taken concurrently). Topics include complex variables, ordinary and partial differential equations, special functions, and boundary value problems with physical applications. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 490. Computer Applications in Physics (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 301 and PHYS 365, or instructor consent. Applications of numerical analysis and computer programming to the solution of problems in classical and modern physics. Available for graduate credit.

PHYS 493. Physics and Astronomy Colloquium (1-1-1)

Preparatory: Junior, senior or graduate standing in Physics. Series of lectures presented weekly by faculty members and invited speakers on topics of current interest in physics, astronomy and related fields. Available for graduate credit. May be repeated twice for credit.

PHYS 495A-C. Directed Undergraduate Research (1-3)

Preparatory: PHYS 365; Senior-standing. Program of original, independent research to be carried out under the direction of one of the physics faculty. May be repeated for credit: maximum six units.

PHYS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Physics (1-3)

Experimental courses in Physics, with course content to be determined.

PHYS 497. Senior Project (3)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This is a senior project course. In it, students work independently throughout the semester on a project assigned by their faculty advisor. Students are required to find a faculty advisor before the course starts. Student project work is done independently, but class will meet weekly to discuss progress, practice talks, writing, …

PHYS 498. Undergraduate Thesis (3)

Preparatory: Admission to Honors Program in Physics.

PHYS 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

See Independent Study under Courses of Study.

PHYS 585. Computational Materials Theory (3)

Prerequisite: PHYS 451 or PHYS 650 or instructor permission. Introduction to the mathematical and physical principles underlying computational materials theory based on quantum mechanics. Topics will include the density functional theory– the cornerstone of modern electronic structure calculations for atoms, molecules, and solids. We will also cover quantum transport, magnetism, and many body physics. The …

PHYS 588. Multiferroic Materials and Systems (3)

Prerequisite: PHYS 451. The lectures cover a wide area of topics ranging from electronic structure, to mechanical properties, to experimental methods of multiferroic systems. Upon completing the course, the student will gain a good overview of multiferroic materials ranging from history to devices applications. Different types of multiferroic materials will be studied with basic crystal …

PHYS 600. Classical Mechanics (4)

Preparatory: PHYS 402, PHYS 410, PHYS 451. Advanced course in classical mechanics, with topics selected from Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, continuum mechanics, nonlinear systems and chaos.

PHYS 601. Selected Topics in Astrophysics (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 375, PHYS 402, PHYS 410. Advanced treatment of the observational and theoretical foundations of astrophysics. Topics may include stellar structure, radio sources, relativistic cosmology, the origin of the elements and galaxy formation.

PHYS 610. Electromagnetic Theory (4)

Preparatory: PHYS 410, PHYS 489. Advanced theoretical treatment of the electrostatic field with introduction of mathematical techniques. Introduction to electromagnetic waves and radiation from sources.

PHYS 630. Statistical Physics (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 431, PHYS 451, PHYS 600. Theoretical foundations of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics for equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. Applications to Bose and Fermi assemblies, real gases, liquids, solids, solutions, phase transitions and chemical reactions.

PHYS 640. General Relativity (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 402, PHYS 410. Introduction to the mathematics and physics of curved space-time. Gravitational fields as curvature of space-time. Einsteins gravitational field equations, solutions and experimental tests. Application to topics of current interest in relativistic astrophysics, particle physics and field theory.

PHYS 650. Quantum Mechanics I (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 451. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: PHYS 600. Mathematical foundation of quantum theory. Scattering theory. Angular momentum and spin. Identical particles. Heisenberg and Schrodinger representations. Perturbation theory.

PHYS 651. Quantum Mechanics II (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 650. Relativistic wave equations. Advanced scattering theory. Selected topics from quantum theory of atoms and molecules.

PHYS 680. Solid State Physics I (3)

Preparatory: PHYS 451 or PHYS 480. Advanced treatment of condensed matter physics. Topics include crystal structure, cohesive energy, lattice vibrations, Sommerfeld theory of metals, electronic structure theory and theory of semiconductors.

PHYS 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (1)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate coordinator. (Credit/No Credit Only)

PHYS 698. Thesis (3-6)

Preparatory: Classified graduate status; Permission of the department; Instructor’s consent to serve as thesis advisor. Dissertation of a specialized advanced topic in physics such as a critical evaluation and extension of an existing theoretical treatment, the construction and use of advanced research apparatus or an original theoretical analysis.

PHYS 699A-F. Independent Study (1-6)

Preparatory: At least one graduate course in Physics; Instructor consent. Investigation of a special topic in physics, with emphasis on advanced theoretical or experimental skills. See Independent Study under Courses of Study.

SCI 100. Science for Life (3)

This course gives college students the skills and knowledge to promote success and instill lifelong learning with emphasis in science, mathematics and technology. The course will provide students with tools to examine their personal, academic and career choices through introspection, consultation, discussion, experimentation and traditional classroom exercises using examples from the natural world. The course …

SCI 111. Understanding Climate Change (3)

Severe global climate change will have disastrous consequences for Earth’s population. This course will develop the basic science behind the predictions for Earth’s climate, and explain why human activities, primarily the emission of greenhouse gases, are the main driver of global warming. Course topics include the causes of climate change, its impacts, projections for the …

SCI 111L. Understanding Climate Change Lab (1)

Corequisite: SCI 111. Laboratory exercises include climate prediction modeling, the use of proxy data, and examination of the impacts of climate change. 3 hours lab per week. Students receive credit for only one course chosen from either SCI 111L, GEOG 111L, or SUST 111L. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided SCI 111 is …

SCI 450. Ultramicroscopy (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course offers hands-on training in advanced microscopic techniques. Students will receive training in atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. Available for graduate credit.

SCI 456. Science Capstone (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of course 1 and course 2 of science specialization. Recommended Preparatory Courses: PHYS 170, GEOL 106LRS/GEOG 106LRS. The capstone course will emphasize concepts from the physical science, earth science and life science content areas with an emphasis on scientific investigation and problem solving. Students will integrate crosscutting themes across the sciences such as …

SCI 565A. Teaching Science for Understanding (1-1-1)

Principles and procedures for engaging secondary-level students in science learning for understanding are presented in this course. This course is intended for secondary-level science teachers, who will develop competencies in the selection of resources and development of lesson plans for a variety of science topics with a special emphasis on science content and practices. Teachers …

SCI 565B. Teaching Science for Understanding (2-2-2)

Principles and procedures for engaging secondary-level students in science learning are presented in this course. This course is intended for secondary-level science teachers, who will develop competencies in the selection of resources and development of lesson plans for a variety of science topics with a special emphasis on science content and practices. Teachers will become …

SCI 565C. Teaching Science for Understanding (3-3)

Principles and procedures for engaging secondary-level students in science learning are presented in this course. This course is intended for secondary-level science teachers, who will develop competencies in the selection of resources and development of lesson plans for a variety of science topics with a special emphasis on science content and practices. Teachers will become …