UNIVERSITY CATALOG: 2020-2021

Courses

ART 100/L. Introduction to Art Processes and Lab (1/2)

Corequisite: ART 100L. Not available for Art major credit. Experiences for the non-art major in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art processes. Provides an understanding of the place of art in life through actual participation. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours studio. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

ART 110. World Arts: The Western Tradition (3)

Survey of the visual arts of the Western cultural tradition from ancient to modern times emphasizing historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Discussion, research and writing on the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, architecture, book arts, ceramics, textiles and body arts. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

ART 112. World Arts: Africa, Oceania and the Americas (3)

Survey of the visual arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas emphasizing historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Discussion, research and writing on the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, architecture, book arts, ceramics, textiles and body arts. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

ART 114. World Arts: Asia (3)

Survey of the visual arts of India, China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia, emphasizing historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Discussion, research and writing on the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, architecture, book arts, ceramics, textiles and body arts. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

ART 120/L. Arts Immersion: Visual Art and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the ITEP Freshman option program. Corequisite: ART 120L. Introduction to the study of visual arts foundation skills, concepts and ideas, based on the Visual and Performing Arts Framework and the Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools. Foundation study in the visual arts includes application of the …

ART 124A. Drawing I (3)

Introduction to basic drawing experiences. Graphic representation of objects stressed through a variety of techniques and media. Emphasis on form, structure, values, line and systems of perspective and space. For non-art majors; 6 hours lab. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

ART 124B. Drawing I (3)

Prerequisite: ART 124A. Basic drawing experiences dealing with the human figure. Emphasis on form, structure, proportions, gesture and systems of perspective and space. 6 hours per week.

ART 140. Beginning Two-Dimensional Design (3)

Introduction to the elements and principles of 2-dimensional design that are common to the visual arts. Foundation course stressing visual perception and an effective knowledge of the graphic means of expression and communication. 6 hours per week. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

ART 141. Beginning Three-Dimensional Design (3)

Study of the elements and principles of 3-dimensional design and their applications, with emphasis on form in space, design systems and contemporary art concepts. Experimentation in both natural and synthetic material. For non-art majors; 6 hours per week. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

ART 148. Color Theory (3)

Prerequisite: ART 140. Introduction to basic theories of color. Investigations of color harmony and its development as applied to 2-and 3-dimensional visual form. Introductory studies of physiological and psychological aspects of color are investigated. 6 hours per week.

ART 151. Photography as Art (3)

Not available for Art major credit. Students must provide their own digital camera (SLR or compact digital). Introduction for non-art majors to the subject matter and aesthetics of photography. Review of artists’ works that have been a major influence in the field and that reflect broader issues in visual culture. Assignments include learning basic camera …

ART 200. Art, Media and Visualization (3)

Practical study of the way art, technology and theories in visual representation shape contemporary visual practice. 6 hours lab.

ART 201. Introduction to Web Art (3)

This course is an introduction to web art and design. In addition to an exposure to the history of the web/Internet, the course will cover basic web development tools, terminology and aesthetics. Students will create webpages using current computer web applications. For non-Art majors. 6 hours lab. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

ART 219. Art in Los Angeles (3)

Introduction to the principles and skills relating to Art History based on study and analysis of museums, galleries and other art exhibitions in the Los Angeles area. Class visits to off-campus sites alternate with in-class seminars for review and discussion of content studied on field trips. Art History majors are required to take this course …

ART 222. Illustration Materials and Techniques (3)

Prerequisite: ART 124B. Introduction to the use of materials and techniques used in a variety of art areas and specifically in the field of illustration. Emphasis on understanding media potential and the development of refined technical skills required for the successful execution of illustrations. Covers wide range of wet- and dry-media tools and techniques. 6 hours …

ART 224A. Drawing II: Anatomy (3)

Prerequisite: ART 124B. Study of the human form and its graphic representation. Problems dealing with anatomy, form and structure introduced by studies of the posed model. 6 hours per week.

ART 227. Painting I (3)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory for Art majors: ART 140. Non-Art majors: Consult department for equivalency. Emphasis on 2-dimensional pictorial structure. Application of design fundamentals to graphic space, organization and imagery. Use of various painting media. 6 hours per week.

ART 230. Perspective (3)

Prerequisite for Art majors: ART 124A. Non-Art majors: Consult department for equivalency. Understanding and use of various systems of perspective. Emphasis upon linear perspective and applications to rendering which are based upon uses of perspective. 6 hours per week.

ART 235. Sculpture I (3)

Recommended Corequisite or Prerequisite: ART 141. Introduction to the materials and basic facilities and processes of sculpture, including woodworking, metal forming, and mixed media applications. 6 hours lab.

ART 237. Printmaking I (3)

Recommended Corequisite or Prerequisite: ART 140. Introduction to the materials and basic processes of printmaking, including intaglio, relief, and planographic processes. Focus is placed on fine art printmaking with self-directed content utilizing design fundamentals. 6 hours lab.

ART 243. Introduction to Typography (3)

Prerequisite: ART 140; Corequisite: ART 200. History, theory and practice of letter forms and typography as they apply to graphics, advertising and other areas of design and visual communication. Projects cover principles of typography, letter structure, typeface selection, fundamentals of computer typesetting and typographic layout. 6 hours lab.

ART 244. Graphic Design I (3)

Introductory survey to the professional field of advertising and graphic design as related to print, multimedia, entertainment, environmental and other areas of visual communications. Emphasis on fundamental principles and skills with a broad approach to the application of techniques and concepts of the field. 6 hours lab.

ART 250. Photography I (3)

Basic instruction in the creative use of the camera and printing techniques. Instruction in basic principles and darkroom experience. Emphasis on photography as a fine art, stressing beginning visual awareness and craftsmanship. 6 hours lab.

ART 263. Animation I (3)

Introduction to the fundamental principles of animation that are the basis for traditional and computer animation. Hand-drawn exercises are utilized to learn timing, motion and weights. Covers introduction to the early history of animation. 6 hours lab.

ART 267. Introduction to Ceramics (3)

Basic methods of hand-building and wheel-forming. Emphasis on designing, decorating, glazing and firing procedures. 6 hours lab.

ART 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Art (1-3)

Experimental courses in Art with course content to be determined.

ART 301. Web Design (3)

Prerequisite: ART 200; Preparatory: ART 201 or ART 244. Introduction to principles and techniques for visual and information design for websites. Includes an introduction to website animation technologies. 6 hours lab.

ART 302. Video/Digital Art (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 200 or ART 202. Studies into artistic concepts and technologies involved in the creation of video art and digital time-based art forms. Investigations into digital imaging, nonlinear compositing and visual effects result in the creation of short artistic statements presented in video/digital format. 6 hours lab.

ART 304. Visual Art and the Child (1)

Prerequisites: ART 120/L; Restricted to students in the ITEP Freshman option program. Provides students with the opportunity to revisit visual art and apply their knowledge of this area to working with children in a school setting. Students extend and integrate their knowledge of visual arts foundation skills, concepts and ideas, based upon the Visual and Performing …

ART 305. Art and Mass Culture (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. An introduction for the non-Art major to the relationships between art and mass culture. Illustrated lectures explore the development, techniques, and ideas underlying the contemporary visual environment, including the media arts of photography and advertising, as well as painting, sculpture and architecture. Art majors may not count …

ART 306. Motion Graphics (3-3)

This course is an introduction to motion graphics, which includes the categories of commercial, broadcast, main sequence and music video. The course will include lectures, showcases and demonstrations of the history, techniques and applications of motion graphics. Projects will cover design, composition, narrative and sound development. Current industry standard computer applications will be introduced and …

ART 307. Core Art Studio (3)

This course is an introduction to upper division art department concentrations, goals, and expectations. The focus is on studio exploration of technology in art and its relationship to contemporary art practice and theory. 6 hours lab.

ART 309. Video for Visual Artists (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Explores the relationship between visual art and video/moving images. Students create short video explorations to study the camera, movement, composition, color, and editing. 6 hours lab.

ART 315. World Perspectives in Art History (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. An introduction to the analysis of art in the context of world cultures. Illustrated lectures explore the artistic responses to universal human needs and experiences: food and shelter, identity, community and death. Art majors may not count this course in the major. (Available for General Education, F …

ART 318. Survey of 19th and 20th Century Arts (3)

Prerequisite: ART 110 or ART 112 or ART 114. A survey of major movements in 19th- and 20th-century art and art theory with reference to social, political, economic and ideological contexts. This course may include visits to major museums, galleries and performance art venues in the Los Angeles area.

ART 322A. Illustration I (3)

Prerequisites: ART 200, ART 222. Basic principles and practices of publication and advertising illustration. Projects emphasize conceptual problem-solving, composition and the development of personal style. Projects are designed for inclusion in a professional portfolio. 6 hours lab.

ART 322B. Illustration II (3)

Prerequisite: ART 322A. Techniques used in illustration, with an emphasis on problem solving and the development of skills necessary in illustration for publication and advertising. 6 hours lab.

ART 322C. Digital Illustration (3-3)

Recommended Preparatory: ART 322A. The study and practice of digital illustration that uses both traditional fine art media and digital technology. Emphasis is on illustration problem-solving, experimental techniques and the development of portfolio quality illustrations. 6 hours lab.

ART 324A. Drawing III: Figure Drawing (3)

Prerequisites: ART 124A, ART 124B, ART 200. Study of the human figure using models. Emphasis on creative interpretation of structure, gesture and space as they relate to the elements of line, form, value and color. 6 hours per week.

ART 324B. Drawing III: Figure Drawing and Painting (3)

Prerequisite: ART 324A. Study of the human figure using models. Emphasis on creative interpretation of structure, gesture and space as they relate to the elements of line, form, value and color. Introduction to a broad range of problems in the combined area of drawing and painting that are nonlinear and apply to the study of …

ART 326. Painting II: Abstract Painting (3)

Prerequisites: ART 200, ART 227. Emphasis on an individuality of response to contemporary problems in painting incorporating a variety of media, techniques and concepts related to abstract painting. 6 hours per week.

ART 327. Painting II: Representational Imagery (3)

Prerequisites: ART 200, ART 227. Emphasis on individuality of response to contemporary problems in painting, incorporating a variety of media, techniques and content related to representational imagery. 6 hours lab.

ART 328. Water Color (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 200; Corequisite: Upper division standing; portfolio review required for repeat credit. Transparent and opaque watercolor techniques. Emphasis on technical proficiency and creative expressions. 6 hours per week.

ART 330. Drawing III: Composition (3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 124A, ART 124B, ART 140, ART 200. Problems, utilizing various drawing media and techniques, stressing the elements of 2-dimensional composition and pictorial organization. 6 hours per week.

ART 335. Sculpture II (3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 141, ART 200, ART 235. Further exploration of sculpture concepts and media, with emphasis on individual invention. 6 hours lab.

ART 337D. Printmaking II: Relief (3)

Prerequisite: ART 237; Preparatory: ART 200. Contemporary relief methods on linoleum, wood, and other related material, with black/white and color printing, and exploration of cross-media approaches. Projects emphasize problem solving through self-directed form and content in the creation of portfolio-quality work. 6 hours lab.

ART 338. Printmaking II (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 237. Intermediate study of intaglio, serigraphy, lithography, relief, or experimental and combination processes, within a contemporary art context. Hand-drawn and photo-processes are investigated with black/white and color printing. Projects emphasize problem solving through individual development of form and content in the creation of portfolio-quality work. 6 hours lab. May be repeated once for …

ART 341. Graphic Design Production (3)

Prerequisites: ART 200, ART 244. Production mechanics of designed projects are prepared for offset printing and digital reproduction. In-depth review of color separations, ink, paper and current trends in print production as well as digital reproduction and multimedia. 6 hours lab.

ART 342. Exhibition Design (3)

Prerequisites: ART 140 or ART 141; ART 200. Study of techniques of exhibition design. Problems of design and production in projects that emphasize creating gallery and related exhibitions or venues. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the …

ART 343. Advanced Typography (3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 243, ART 244. Theory and practice of letter forms and typography as they apply to graphics, advertising and other areas of design and visual communication. Projects cover principles of typography, letter structure, type face selection, fundamentals of computer typesetting and typographic layout. 6 hours lab.

ART 344. Graphic Design II (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 244. Corequisite: ART 200. Preparatory: ART 341 or equivalent. Introduction to intermediate skills and conceptual problems of the field. Stressed is the integration of theory with practical applications. Projects demand creative solutions to typical problems faced by the graphic designer. 6 hours lab.

ART 345. Design for Entertainment Advertising (3)

Prerequisite: ART 344. Preparatory: ART 343. This course concentrates on the theory and practice of advertising design for the entertainment industry. Students are expected to develop a combination of graphic design, illustration, concept development and branding skills for the purposes of promoting motion pictures and television through a wide variety of media (posters, print ads, …

ART 350. Photography II (3)

Prerequisite: ART 250. Continuation of the principles learned in Photography I with more advanced process and content exploration. Students explore the medium more fully through analog and alternative processes, including exhibition quality print production, toning, and multiple imagery. Introduction of digital approaches using analog and digital sources with accompanying discussion of relevant historic and contemporary …

ART 351. Digital Photo Imaging (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 250. Preparatory: ART 200. Exploration of digital photography, integrating established principles of the photo medium with digital technologies. Photo images are created and manipulated through digital software processes for both fine art and commercial application. Assignments result in a portfolio. May be repeated once for credit; 6 hours lab.

ART 352. Visual Effects (3-3)

Prerequisite: For Art majors and minors upper division standing, or instructor consent (non-majors). Studies in the conceptualization and techniques of digitally generated visual effects in time-based media. Creative self-expression is emphasized in the production of experimental short videos. 6 hours lab.

ART 353. Color Photography (3-3)

Preparatory: ART 200, ART 250 or equivalent. Investigation into the various aspects of color photography, which include: exposure and development of negative film; printing with color materials utilizing the subtractive color principles that underlie color filtration and correction; a brief survey of contemporary color photographers with an emphasis on the aesthetics of their works; and refinement …

ART 354. Computer Graphics (3-3)

Prerequisites for Art majors: ART 200, ART 244. Non-art majors: Consult department for equivalency. Application and principles of computer graphics as a creative technological medium. Practical experience with micro-computers in studying the potentials of graphic communication and visual expression. 6 hours lab.

ART 357. Narrative Digital Photography (3)

Prerequisite: ART 250. Continuation of the principles learned in Photography I while exploring the multiple uses of still images. Students explore the medium more fully through experience with creating photo sequences and short time based projects. The history and heritage of still photography is discussed in relation to trends in contemporary photography. Students create digital slide …

ART 358. User Experience and User Interface Design (3)

Prerequisite: ART 244. This intermediate course focuses on theory and design of user experience and user interfaces for interactive products. Students will practice researching, strategizing, conceiving and prototyping solutions for interactive mediums and devices. Key principles of innovation, design thinking, user-centered design, branding design, and advances in technology will be explored. 6 hours lab.

ART 363A. Animation II (3)

Prerequisite: ART 263. Further study of animation skills for both traditional and computer animation. Introduction to storyboard process, character design and story development. Intermediate-level animation principles, including character expression, lip sync and staging. Continuation of animation history 1943 to the present. 6 hours lab.

ART 363B. Animation II (3)

Intermediate animation emphasizing concept development in preparation for a 3-D computer or 2-D animation project. Includes research, story development, character design, timing studies, scenic design and storyboards. Work culminates in a process book and animatic. 6 hours lab.

ART 364. 3-D Computer Animation (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 263. Investigation of 3-D computer animation with emphasis on animation timing, modeling and lighting. 6 hours lab.

ART 365. 3-D Computer Animation II (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 364. Intermediate study of 3-D computer animation with focus on 3-D character creation and animation. Includes: design, modeling, rigging, key-frame lip-sync acting, background, lighting, texturing, coloring and critical analysis of 3-D characters from the game and animation fields. 6 hours lab.

ART 366. Ceramics II (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 267. Investigation of the use of clay as a medium with an emphasis on sculptural applications. Discussion of ideas, technical processes and approaches as they relate to clay’s use as a non-utilitarian medium. Experimentation with mold making, casting, clay bodies, glaze formulation and surface treatments. 6 hours lab.

ART 367. Ceramics III (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 267. Further investigation of the use of clay as a medium with emphasis on experimental practice. Further discussion of ideas, technical processes and approaches as it relates to the work and contemporary visual art. Continued experimentation with wheel forming, hand building, clay bodies, glaze formulation and surface treatments. 6 hours lab.

ART 368. Game Animation and Design (3-3)

Recommended Preparatory: ART 365. Investigation of the creative process of game design and game animation. Practical, theoretical and global aspects of game design will be explored by creating game assets and producing animation work. 6 hours lab.

ART 380/L. Children’s Art and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 380L. Recommended for Multiple Subjects Credential Candidates. Development of fundamentals and principles for determining art experiences for children. Understanding the significance of art in the child’s development. Emphasis on developing basic art skills in criticism, aesthetics, history and studio production. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours studio and visits to art …

ART 383/L. Art in Early Childhood and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 383L. Analysis and discussion of the significance of art in the development of young children ages 3 through 8 combined with studio experiences in 2- and 3-dimensional materials. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours studio.

ART 385/L. Children’s Crafts and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 385L. Basic skills and understandings that provide meaningful craft experiences for children. Emphasis on the educational value of crafts. Beginning techniques and processes involving 3-dimensional materials. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours studio.

ART 389CS. Impact Design (3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 243 and ART 244 or permission by instructor. Pre/Corequisite: ART 344 or permission by instructor. Through community-based projects and service learning opportunities in reciprocal relationship with community organizations, students explore the many roles creative professionals play when executing projects for social impact. Design teams develop skills in design methodology for visual communication: identifying problems, design …

ART 401. History of Native North American Art (3)

The visual arts of North American native cultures from the Eskimo to Canada, the Northwest and Southwest areas of the United States, the Plains and Eastern Indian societies. Available for graduate credit.

ART 402. Advanced Video/Digital Art (3-3)

Preparatory: ART 302. Advanced studies into video/digital art involve exploration into a broad range of artistic concepts and visual technologies utilized in video/digital media and time-based art forms. Investigation into art software applications and experimental methods lead to the production and refinement of artistic statements presented in video/digital format. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 404. History of African and Oceania Art (3)

Visual arts of sub-Saharan tribal Africa are considered in their cultural context, including related art forms, such as literature, music and ritual observances. Arts of the South Pacific, the tribal societies of Melanesia, Polynesia, Micronesia and Australia. Available for graduate credit.

ART 405. Advanced Web Design (3)

Prerequisite: ART 301; Recommended Preparatory: ART 354. Advanced techniques in web design. This course covers advanced techniques in current computer web applications, interaction/motion web design and programming tools. 6 hours lab.

ART 412. History of Korean Art (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Korean visual culture from the Neolithic period to the present time. Investigation of various art forms in different media (including ceramics, calligraphy, painting, sculpture, architecture, woodblock print, photograph, video, installation and performance) and ways in which different artistic features are connected to specific historical, religious, philosophical and political contexts. Available for graduate …

ART 413. History of Chinese Art (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Chinese visual culture from the Neolithic period to the present time. Investigation of various art forms in different media (including ceramics, jade and bronze objects, calligraphy, painting, sculpture, architecture, woodblock print, photographs, video, installations and performance) and ways in which different artistic features are connected to specific historical, religious, philosophical and …

ART 414. History of Japanese Art (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Japanese visual culture from the Neolithic period to the present time. Investigation of various art forms in different media (including ceramics, bronze objects, calligraphy, painting, sculpture, architecture, woodblock print, photographs, video, installations and performance) and ways in which different artistic features are connected to specific historical, religious, philosophical and political contexts. Available for …

ART 415. History of the Art of India (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Indian visual culture from the Neolithic period to the present time. Investigation of various art forms in different media (including ceramics, bronze objects, painting, sculpture, architecture, photographs, video, installations and performance) and ways in which different artistic features are connected to specific historical, religious, philosophical and political contexts.

ART 416. History of Ancient Near Eastern Art (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of the architecture, sculpture and related art forms of the ancient Near East, Mesopotamia, Anatolia and Iran from prehistoric times to the beginning of the Sassanian Empire. Available for graduate credit.

ART 420. History of Greek Art and Architecture (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of the Aegean area from the early Archaic to the end of the Hellenistic periods. Available for graduate credit.

ART 421. History of Roman Art and Architecture (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of the Roman World from circa 700 B.C. to 400 A.D. Available for graduate credit.

ART 422. Illustration III (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 322B. Advanced study of specific problems in publication and advertising illustration. Projects require the creative implementation of the ideas, media and techniques used by illustrators. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 427. Painting III (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 326, ART 327. Emphasis on individuality and invention through independent research and experimentation. Guidelines and objectives to be established with individuals. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for third and fourth semester repeat credit.) Available for graduate credit. 6 hours per week.

ART 429. Advanced Study in Studio Art (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing and instructor permission. Portfolio review required upon entering the course. Projects emphasize conceptual development in art through visual and material based research, advanced critique and presentation skills, and exposure to contemporary art. Students will develop professional skills and materials. Professional portfolio is emphasized. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours per week.

ART 430. Drawing IV: Composition (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 330. Advanced drawing problems in 2-dimensional composition and pictorial organization. 6 hours per week.

ART 431. History of Baroque Art (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Preparatory: ART 426. A study of the arts from the Counter Reformation (1563) to the death of Louis XIV (1715). Painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe with a special emphasis on the arts of Italy, the Netherlands and France. Regular written assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

ART 435. Sculpture III (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 335. Advanced study with special consideration of conception, media and techniques through emphasis on individual projects. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for third and fourth semester repeat credit.) Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 437. Printmaking III (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 338 or ART 337A or ART 337B or ART 337C or ART 337D. Advanced study of intaglio, serigraphy, lithography, relief, or experimental and combination processes, within a contemporary, fine art context. Emphasis is placed on self-directed exploration into process, form, and content, in the creation of portfolio-quality work. Guidelines and goals discussed on an …

ART 438/L. Senior Projects and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Corequisite: ART 438L. Projects that afford students the opportunity to assess their training, summarize their achievement and analyze their place in the visual arts. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation.

ART 439. Bronze Casting Sculpture (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 235. Lost-wax bronze-casting foundry projects. Students create sculpture to be cast in bronze. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours per week.

ART 442. 3-D Computer Animation III (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 364. Recommended Preparatory: ART 365. Advanced study of 3-D Computer Animation with a focus on character acting, timing and advanced action analysis. Includes: key-frame animation with full body gestures, lip sync acting, and support elements of modeling, rigging, texturing, and lighting. Culminating in the production of quality work suitable for student demo reel. …

ART 443. Animation Drawing (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 224A. Exploration of the various forms of drawing related to the field of animation. Direct drawing of the human figure from models; drawing a variety of animals from live observation; and development of layout drawing used for background painting. Emphasis on volume, mass, weight, movement/gesture, conveying attitude, dramatic expression, action poses, acting, anatomy, …

ART 444. Graphic Design III (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 344. Advanced and complex problem-solving consistent with those of graphic designers in the field. Emphasis on project of substantive scope, integration of skills and presentation. Students should have developed a professional resume and portfolio by the end of this series. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 446. Packaging Design (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 344. Designing for product containers, identification graphics, product line packaging and related displays. Coordination of the fundamental elements of packaging such as typography, color, imagery and package structure. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 448. History of Contemporary Art (3)

Prerequisite: ART 110 or ART 112 or ART 114. Deals with American and European art from the mid-20th century to the present. Includes a study of developments in non-traditional media, crafts and popular arts, as well as painting and sculpture. Regular written assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

ART 450. Photography III (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 302 or ART 309 or ART 350 or ART 351 or ART 353 or ART 357. Advanced problems in photography. Emphasis on content: The student is encouraged to apply technical and expressive skills in photography toward some original and meaningful use of the medium. Students are required to present an original project to …

ART 455A. Photography/Video Lighting I (3)

Prerequisite: ART 302 or ART 309 or ART 350 or ART 351 or ART 353 or ART 357. Professional problems, techniques and equipment in studio lighting. Introduction to basic studio photography fundamentals, various lighting systems and advanced digital workflow. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 455B. Photography/Video Lighting II (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 455A. Advanced projects in advertising photography. Emphasis on problems of large product and exterior photography, portrait and figure studies and uses of complex lighting. May be repeated once for credit. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 455C. Photography/Video Lighting III (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 455B. Investigation of advanced advertising problems in photography exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Advanced projects in portraiture, fashion, table-top, photo-illustration and editorial will be addressed. Computer imaging introduced as an important area of investigation. May be repeated once for credit. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 458. Graphics Seminar (3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 344; Six additional units of upper division graphic design; Senior standing. Review career options related to visual communication. Students develop and apply solutions to business-related problems faced in the design profession, such as incorporating team concepts, building professional relationships and refining communication skills. Students develop professional résumés and portfolios (print and digital). The course …

ART 461. History of Graphic Arts (3)

Emphasizes the study of graphic design and its impact on society from the 19th to 21st centuries, including the development of typography and graphic art from the 15th to the 19th century. Available for graduate credit.

ART 462. History of Photography (3)

Emphasizes the aesthetics of photography and its emergence and acceptance as a fine art. In addition to slide lectures and discussions, students are required to attend several photography exhibitions and lectures at galleries and museums in the area. Available for graduate credit.

ART 463. Animation III (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 363B. Advanced level development and production of an original animation project. Students may utilize 3-D computer animation or 2-D methods. May be repeated once for credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 465. Game Animation Project (3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 364. Preparatory: ART 368. Advanced level design and creation of a game production project. Students may use either 2-D or 3-D animation techniques to create a video game prototype. Includes concept development, creation of character assets, animation cycles, and environments. May be repeated once for credit. 6 hours lab.

ART 467. Ceramics IV (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 367. Advanced investigation of the use of clay as it relates to a personal direction. Advanced refinement of ideas, technical processes and approaches as they relate to a unified body of work and to contemporary visual art. Continued experimentation with technical processes, clay bodies, glaze formulation and surface treatments. Development of portfolio materials and …

ART 468. History of Women in the Visual Arts (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Preparatory: GWS 100. Covers the history of women as artists in the European and American traditions. Art by women in non-Western cultures also is studied, together with related issues such as images of women and feminist art analysis. Available for graduate credit.

ART 488CS. Public Art (3-3)

Development and completion of art forms in the public realm. Public art investigated in a workshop format that includes speakers, demonstrations, field trips and art products. Emphasis on studio skills, proposal development and service learning activities. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. …

ART 494. Internship in Arts (3-3)

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing; Portfolio review. Available for Art major credit. Academic Internship course. Experiential education in appropriate aspects of specific area of interest. Available for graduate credit. 6 units maximum. (Credit/No Credit only)

ART 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Art (1-3)

Experimental courses in Art with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

ART 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Enrollment in Independent Study is by department chair’s consent and instructor’s consent to act as sponsor. Admission based on evidence of ability to pursue in-depth independent study and approval of a project submitted at the time of registration. Regular progress meetings and reports are required throughout the semester. Completion of the project is required before …

ART 510. Methods and Practice of Art History (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Art History or senior status and instructor permission. Seminar designed to develop student skills in art historical research, and a critical introduction to the practice and methodology of art history as a discipline. Graduate students will practice the application of theoretical and philosophical frameworks in all assignments. Satisfies upper division core requirement …

ART 519A-Z. Selected Topics in Art History (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent or classified graduate standing. Research in depth on specific topics within art history. Topics vary per semester. May be taken three times for credit.

ART 520. Studio Problems Video/Digital Art (3-3-3-3)

Investigation into artistic studio problems in video/digital art. Explorations lead to resolution of personal artistic statements. Increasing complexity in concept, media and presentation is required in the sequence of coursework. Available for repeat credit. 6 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 521. Studio Problems: Painting (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in painting, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 522. Studio Problems: Illustration (3-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in illustration with exploration leading to concrete resolutions. Problems of increased complexity and greater depth of practical problem solving required in the sequence of coursework. 6 hours lab.

ART 524. Studio Problems: Drawing (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 424. Investigation of advanced problems in drawing or in drawing and related art disciplines. Projects of increasing complexity that require evidence of greater depth and skill in the resolution of visual statements. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 525. Studio Problems: Printmaking (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in printmaking, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 535. Studio Problems: Sculpture (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in sculpture.

ART 542CS. Advanced Exhibition Design (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Advanced study of the primary components of exhibition design, including curating, budgeting, installation and promotion. Focuses on public relations, education, community service, tours, publicity and publication as they pertain to the CSUN and/or community galleries and their functions. Several class meetings held in each of the art galleries, as well as other …

ART 544. Studio Problems: Graphic Design (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 444 or equivalent; Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in graphic design exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Projects of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 6 hours lab.

ART 550. Studio Problems: Photography (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Portfolio review; Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in photography exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Projects of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 6 hours lab.

ART 560. Studio Problems in Ceramics Design (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in ceramics and/or glass design, exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 579/L. Art Education Across Cultures and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 579L. Provides knowledge and practice in planning art experiences, and increases teacher effectiveness in multi- and cross-cultural teaching of the arts. Incorporates focused activities for graduate students. Meets requirement for multicultural education for Multiple and Single Subject Credentials. Course contains both lecture and lab activities.

ART 585/L. Studio Problems Teaching 2-D Art and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Corequisite ART 585L. Required for a Single Subject Credential in Art. Develop instructional methods, organize standards-based curriculum, and refine art skills for teaching art in a variety of educational settings. Topics will include the study of art and art education, curriculum development, traditional and emerging art media and methods, …

ART 586/L. Studio Problems Teaching 3-D Art and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Required for a Single Subject Credential in Art. Develop instructional strategies, organize standards-based curricula, and refine art skills for teaching art in a variety of educational settings. Topics will include the study of art and art education, curriculum development, traditional and emerging art media and materials, and technology in …

ART 588. Studio Problems in Public Art (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: ART 488; 400-level Art course; Instructor consent. Development and completion of art forms planned for placement in the public realm. Increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth required in the sequence of coursework. Public art investigated in a workshop format that includes speakers, demonstrations and field trips. Emphasis on studio activities, proposal development and service …

ART 590. History and Philosophy of Art Education (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Required for Single Subject Credential in Art. May be used as upper division Art elective for B.A. degree. Intensive study of the historical and chronological development of Art Education in America and abroad. Emphasis on significant trends and movements that have affected its growth and present structure.

ART 611. History and Philosophy of Art (3)

Prerequisites: Minimum 1 year Art History (2 years recommended); Graduate standing. Seminar examining the development of movements and ideas in 20th century art. Research in modern art and artists. (Offered Fall semester.)

ART 615. Art Analysis and Criticism (3)

Prerequisites: Minimum 1 year of Art History; Graduate standing. Seminar exploring the critical approach to the work of art in terms of form, content and expression. Aesthetic and methodological problems will be treated in particular relationship to contemporary art and its criticism. (Offered Spring semester.)

ART 620. Advanced Studio Problems: Video/Digital Art (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisite: ART 502 or equivalent. Investigation into advanced concepts involved in the production of video/digital art forms. Explores resolution of problems dealing with media, technique and presentation. Increasing complexity and evidence of conceptual depth is required in the sequence of coursework. 6 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 621. Advanced Studio Problems: Painting (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in painting, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. May be repeated 3 times for credit. 1 hour per week in seminar, 5 hours per week in …

ART 622. Advanced Studio Problems: Illustration (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in illustration, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 624. Advanced Studio Problems: Drawing (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in drawing and related art disciplines. Projects of increasing complexity that require evidence of greater depth and skill in the resolution of visual statements. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 625. Advanced Studio Problems: Printmaking (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in printmaking, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 635. Advanced Studio Problems: Sculpture (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in sculpture.

ART 644. Advanced Studio Problems: Graphic Design (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in graphic design, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 650. Advanced Studio Problems: Photography (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: 6 units of ART 550; Classified graduate standing; Portfolio review. Investigation of advanced problems in photography exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Projects of increasing complexity with evidence of greater depth of artistic concept and proficiency required in the sequence of coursework. 6 hours lab.

ART 660. Advanced Studio Problems in Ceramics Design (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in ceramics, exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. 1 hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.

ART 667. Teaching Art in Higher Education (3-3)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Classified graduate standing in Visual Arts. Content includes the study and practice of teaching art to undergraduate students in institutions of higher education; developing strategies for course organization, lectures/discussions, learning techniques, and other responsibilities of faculty within higher education institutions. This elective course counts toward the graduate degree and may be …

ART 681A. Seminar in Art Education (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate standing. Graduate students from outside the Department of Art permitted with consent of instructor. Study of the nature of creativity in art, place of art in the curriculum, improving teaching methods and inquiry into other disciplines for related implications. Identification of areas of greatest need for research.

ART 681B. Seminar in Art Education (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate standing. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: ART 681A. Investigation and identification of areas in greatest need of research in art education. Special emphasis on selection of projects most appropriate for development and for advanced research.

ART 686. Research in Art Education (3-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Restricted to M.A. Art candidates. Recommended Corequisite: ART 681B. Current experiments and studies in art education; problems of conducting research unique to the area of investigation. Development of research studies with emphasis on design, criteria, measurement and standards of proof.

ART 690A-Z. M.F.A. Studio (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: M.F.A.; Classified status; Instructor’s and graduate advisor’s consent. Investigation of advanced artistic problems leading to a highly specialized and personal aesthetic. 5 hours per week.

ART 691A-Z. M.F.A. Seminar (3-3-3-3)

Prerequisites: M.F.A.; Classified status. Orientation to the procedures and requirements of the M.F.A. professional degree programs in Studio or Visual communication Arts. Exploration into career development, professional issues and writing about art. Philosophies pertaining to disciplines in the visual arts are examined through a series of guest lectures. 3 hours per week.

ART 696B-C. Directed Graduate Research (2-3)

Prerequisites: Classified status; Advisor consent.

ART 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing in the areas of Art Education or Art History; Completion of or current enrollment in all required Area of Concentration courses for the M.A. degree in Art; Consent of graduate advisor and thesis committee; Conformance to University standards for graduate thesis. Encompasses the preparation, completion and formal presentation of the culminating …

ART 698D. Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Completion of, or current enrollment in all remaining required courses. Advancement to Candidacy fulfilled. Consists of the spring group exhibition and/or performance of the student’s work, photographic documentation and a written statement addressing the aesthetic, philosophical and, when appropriate, technical aspects of the work, and an exhibition catalog.

ART 698F. M.A. Thesis/Artistic Performance (6)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Completion of or current enrollment in all required courses.

ART 698MFA. M.F.A. Thesis/Artistic Performance (3)

Prerequisites: M.F.A.; Classified status; Completion of or current enrollment in all required area of concentration courses for the M.F.A. degree; Consent of graduate advisor and thesis committee; Conformance to University standards for graduate thesis. Provides the M.F.A. candidate with a culminating experience, approved and supervised by the degree committee, which presents the artistic endeavors pursued …

ART 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Enrollment limited to qualified classified graduate students with the consent of the department, graduate advisor and the departmental graduate committee. Intensive independent investigation into that area of the fine arts in which the graduate student is specializing.

COMS 104/L. Literature in Performance and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: COMS 104L. Introduction to principles, techniques and practices in solo performance of poetry, fiction and drama. 15 hours of communication experience outside of class are required. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

COMS 150. Introduction to Communication Studies (3)

An introduction to Communication Studies with an emphasis on the history of the field and the various theories, contexts and perspectives that inform the study of human communication. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

COMS 151/L. Fundamentals of Public Speaking and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level writing, or completion of 113A or 114A, or completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: COMS 151L. Introduction to the study of the human communication process, with an emphasis on effective public communication. Includes intensive practice in public speaking, reasoning and critical listening. 15 hours of communication experience …

COMS 195. Forensics (1-1-1-1)

Supervised activity in competitive intercollegiate forensics.

COMS 199. Performance Ensemble (1)

Supervised activity in group performance of literature. Participation in theatre programs before campus audiences. Course is repeatable for a maximum of four completions of credit.

COMS 225/L. Argumentation and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level writing. Corequisite: 225L. Studies of the strategies used for rhetorical argument. Emphasis is given to ways of finding issues, using evidence and detecting fallacies in rhetorical communications. Practice is given in the formulation and critical analysis of argument in rhetorical communications. 15 hours of communication experience outside of class …

COMS 251. Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)

This course offers a relational view of communication and explores how relationships are created, negotiated, maintained, and terminated between two people. Students will work on improving communication skills and exploring the dynamics of interpersonal communication such as intimacy, communication climates and interpersonal conflict. Interpersonal communication includes-but is not limited to-communicating with friends, family, co-workers, fellow …

COMS 301. Performance, Language and Cultural Studies (3)

Study of the complex relationships among culture, language and performance in communication. Examination of theory, behavior, practice and criticism from aesthetic and sociocultural perspectives, with emphasis on contemporary research in language, culture and performance studies.

COMS 303. Narrative in Performance (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 301. Theory and practice in performing narrative fiction and nonfiction. Analysis of the role of narrative in the communicative life of the individual and society. Solo and group performances.

COMS 304. Poetry in Performance (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 301. Theory and practice in performing poetry. Analysis of the role of poetry and poetic language in the communicative life of the individual and society. Solo and group performances.

COMS 309. Advanced Public Speaking (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 151/L or COMS 225L; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Application of the principles of audience analysis to the preparation, presentation and evaluation of persuasive messages. (Available for Communication Studies majors as General Education, Basic Skills A1 Oral Communication and Information Competence.)

COMS 315. Communication and Agency (3)

An examination of the role of agency in human communication, with an emphasis on the relationship between purpose, choice and efficacy in communicative action.

COMS 320. Communicative Functions of Language (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 351. Study of the form and structure of the language of persuasive discourse, including semantics, syntax, usage, lexicography and style.

COMS 321. Rhetorical Discourse (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the language and principles of human communication through the production, analysis and evaluation of rhetorical messages. Satisfies the teacher credential program requirement for competence in writing.

COMS 323. Group Communication (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Principles and methods of small group communication. Development of individual and group skills through application of theory to practice. Emphasis is on intra-group behavior. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

COMS 325. Legal Argumentation (3)

Study of courtroom argument, with emphasis on issues, evidence, forms of argument and language in lawyers’ pleadings and judicial opinions.

COMS 327. Rhetorical Theory (3)

Theories of rhetoric from classical Greece and Rome to the present. Critical methodologies inherent in rhetorical theories of each period are applied to typical examples of public discourse of that period.

COMS 350. Nonverbal Communication (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 351. Discussion and examination of nonverbal communication and its effects upon the individual’s attitudes and verbal communication.

COMS 351. Communication Theory (3)

Survey of multiple theoretical perspectives on the study of human communication. Examination of the relationships among communication theory and other areas of study within the field of communication studies.

COMS 356. Intercultural Communication (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Cultural factors in interpersonal communication, such as perception, roles, language codes and nonverbal communication. Students will apply and evaluate theories of intercultural communication. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.) (IC)

COMS 360. Communication and the Sexes (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. An examination of the communication styles of males and females in a variety of settings. Emphasis is given to gender-related communication behavior and its implications for the ability to maintain effective personal and professional relationships. Strategies for fostering communication competence will be discussed. (Available for General Education, …

COMS 395. Forensics (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: COMS 195 or instructor consent. Faculty mentored activity in competitive intercollegiate forensics.

COMS 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Communication Studies (3)

Experimental courses in Communication Studies with course content to be determined.

COMS 399. Performance Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: COMS 301. Work in collaboration to generate, stage, and present original performances for a variety of audiences. These performances may include original scripts as well as adaptations of poetry, prose fiction, nonfiction, and oral histories. May be taken up to four times for credit.

COMS 400C. Directing Oral Performance (3)

Prerequisites: Available only to upper division students who have completed a minimum of two units of any of the following: COMS 195, COMS 198 or COMS 199; Consent of instructor. Faculty-supervised students direct other students’ oral performances. May be taken for a maximum of 6 units.

COMS 401. Performance and Social Change (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 301. Examination and application of contemporary theories of performance as a means of change in individual and communal life. Students employ performance methodologies to examine complexities of various communication contexts and situations and enact various strategies for working through these complexities. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 404. Theories of Interpretation (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 301. Examination of psychological, social, cultural, literary and hermeneutic theories of interpretation, with an emphasis on the interaction of text, context and audience. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 406. Performance Composition (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 301 or graduate standing in Communication Studies. Corequisite: COMS 399 or graduate status in Communication Studies. Study and application of contemporary theories of performance as a means of creating, directing, and presenting original performance works. Students will develop performance composition skills in collaboration with students enrolled in Performance Ensemble, with the goal of …

COMS 410. Community-Based Performance (3)

This course examines a central premise in communication and performance studies that performance is integral to individual, communal and cultural processes, practices and institutions. Students will develop performances in collaboration with particular communities that express that community’s identity, experiences, issues and goals. We will employ theories and methods of performance that foster cultivating and sustaining …

COMS 420. Language and Symbolic Processes (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the structural, psychological and semantic facets of language and their implications for the study of rhetorical communication. Regular written assignments will be required. Available for graduate credit. (Available for Section C of the Multicultural Requirement for credential candidates.)

COMS 425. Theories of Argument and Deliberation (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 327. Exploration of theories of argument and their application to decision making. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 428. Freedom of Speech (3)

Exploration of freedom of speech in American society. Emphasis given to a communication studies approach to issues in freedom of speech. Focus on contemporary problems of free speech in the U.S., including sedition, obscenity, advocacy of illegal action, libel, words of provocation, copyright, academic freedom and national security. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 430. Rhetorical Criticism (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Instruction in the methods and applications of rhetorical criticism, focusing upon the analysis and evaluation of rhetorical discourse. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 431. Persuasion (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 351. Logical and psychological principles used by writers and speakers to effect social control. Analysis and evaluation of recent research in attitude modification. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 435. Rhetoric of Women (3)

Prerequisites: COMS 327; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Analysis and evaluation of the rhetoric of women involved in political, social and economic reforms. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 437. Communication for Youth Institute (3-3)

Prerequisites: COMS 151/L; Prior approval of the CYI Program Coordinator. Instruction is provided in communication education. Faculty-supervised students will teach communication skills to area youth in a community service-learning program. Students work closely with the instructor in course preparation, delivery of course content, oral and written assignment evaluation, and curricular assessment. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 440. Performance and Cultural Studies Criticism (3)

Recommended Preparatory: COMS 301. This course is an introduction to the critical methods in performance studies and cultural studies. It provides instruction on critical interpretation and analysis, as well as specific methods used in performance studies and cultural studies. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 442. Rhetoric of Peace and Conflict (3)

Prerequisites: COMS 327; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Exploration of the rhetorical implications of conflict and struggle as performed in subcultural, national and international contexts. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 444. Political Rhetoric (3)

Prerequisites: COMS 327; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of rhetoric of recent U.S. political campaigns, both local and national, including persuasive techniques, ethical considerations and effectiveness. Practice in planning and developing rhetorical messages for political campaigns. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 445. Communication and Popular Cultures (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 301. A survey of theories of contemporary popular cultural forms as human communicative behavior. Students will learn to utilize theories of rhetoric, performance and critical/cultural studies to analyze popular cultural artifacts as symbolic forms. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 446. Rhetoric of Crime and Punishment (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of rhetoric of crime, criminal procedure, punishment and justice in different societies and cultures. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 448. Rhetoric of Extraordinary Claim (3)

Prerequisites: COMS 327; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of rhetorical strategies used to advance extraordinary claims and of rhetorical methods of analysis that may be used to identify irrational appeals. Specific consideration of rhetorical discourse dealing with the paranormal, pseudoscience, cryptozoology and conspiracy theories. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate …

COMS 450. Communication Research Methodology (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of the strategy and methodology of contemporary research in communication. Emphasis is on scientific process, the derivation and verification of hypotheses in communication and persuasion, and basic communication research design. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 451. Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 351. This course examines the process of interpersonal communication as a focus of research and theory. Attention will be given to relationship messages, stages of interpersonal relationships, relationship rituals, intimate dialogue, the dialogue of distance, maintaining relationships through dialogue, and developing effective communication in relationships. The course takes a “social constructionist” approach to …

COMS 452. Communication Training and Development (3)

Recommended Preparatory: COMS 351, COMS 450. This course is an examination and analysis of the processes and challenges of communication training and development. Through discussion and fieldwork, students explore applications of communication theory and learn how to conduct organizational culture audits and communication competency assessments through observations, evaluations, analyses, interviews, focus groups and surveys of …

COMS 453. Organizational Communication (3)

Prerequisite: COMS 351. Application of the principles of human communication in the formal organizational setting, including communication channels, networks, climate and relationships. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 454. Communication and Technology (3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; Communication Studies students only. Historical and theoretical survey of the social, cultural, and cognitive impact of mediated human communication. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 464. Digital Rhetorics (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. This course explores popular rhetorics of communication in the Digital Age, and offers an examination of the influence of modern digital technologies and environments on persuasion and communication. Available for graduate credit.

COMS 494/L. Internship in Communication Studies and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisites: Communication Studies major; approval through application and instructor consent; COMS 323 or COMS 351 or COMS 452 or COMS 453. Upon approval by the instructor, a student may earn up to 3 units credit per semester and up to 6 units total for practical experience dealing with communication problems and concerns in public or …

COMS 495. Internship in Organizational Communication (3-3)

Prerequisite: COMS 453. Upon prior approval by the program coordinator, a student may earn up to 3 units credit per semester and up to 6 units total for practical experience in public or private formal organizations in dealing with communication problems and concerns. Academic Internship course. (Credit/No Credit only)

COMS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Communication Studies (3)

Experimental courses in Communication Studies with course content to be determined.

COMS 600. Core Seminar in Communication (3)

Introduction to graduate study in communication theory, rhetorical theory, performance, language and cultural studies.

COMS 601. Core Seminar in Communication Research Methods (3)

This course is an introduction to the epistemological assumptions, design and methods of analysis in communication research. It provides a broad overview of humanistic, social scientific, rhetorical and critical approaches to studying communication.

COMS 603. Seminar in Performance Studies (3)

Study of performance as communication. Examination of theory, practice and criticism from aesthetic and sociocultural perspectives, with emphasis on contemporary research in performance, language and cultural studies.

COMS 604. Seminar in Textual Studies (3)

Study of performance implications of varying critical approaches to text.

COMS 610. Current Research in Performance Studies (3-3)

Corequisite: COMS 600. Advanced study of new and current developments in performance studies. May be repeated once for credit.

COMS 620. Seminar in Communication and Language (3)

Study of contemporary theories of language and linguistics as applied to principles of communication. Emphasis on language and social interaction, linguistic pragmatics and systems of symbolic representation.

COMS 631. Studies in Classical Rhetoric (3)

Advanced study in rhetorical theory, from ancient Greece through the Renaissance.

COMS 632. Studies in Contemporary Rhetoric (3)

Advanced study in contemporary rhetorical theory.

COMS 633. Studies in Postmodern Rhetoric (3)

Advanced study in postmodern rhetorical theory.

COMS 634. Applied Rhetorical Studies (3)

Advanced study of the application of rhetorical theories to situated discourse. Topics include rhetorical criticism, argumentation analysis and/or the application of critical and social theory.

COMS 635. Feminist Perspectives on Communication (3)

Study of contemporary feminist theories applied to communication research.

COMS 640. Current Research in Rhetorical Studies (3-3)

Corequisite: COMS 600. Advanced study of new and current developments in Rhetorical Studies. May be repeated once for credit.

COMS 650. Seminar in Communication Theory (3)

Study of historical and contemporary trends in theory and research on communication and communication processes.

COMS 651. Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)

Study of advanced principles of communication as applied to interpersonal communication theory. Special emphasis on research in the area of interpersonal communication.

COMS 652. Seminar in Group Communication (3)

Study of advanced principles of communication as applied to small-group communication theory and research.

COMS 653. Seminar in Organizational Communication Research (3)

Study of advanced principles of communication as applied to the organizational setting, with special emphasis on research in organizational communication.

COMS 654. Seminar in Communication and Technology (3)

Advanced study of the principles of communication technology, with emphasis on theory and research.

COMS 656. Seminar in Intercultural Communication (3)

Study of advanced principles of communication as applied to intercultural communication. Special emphasis on research in the area of intercultural communication.

COMS 660. Current Research in Communication Theory (3-3)

Corequisite: COMS 600. Advanced study of new and current developments in communication theory. May be repeated once for credit.

COMS 680. Communication Education (3)

Exploration of the communication dimensions of adult education and critical pedagogy. Application of theory in a wide range of instructional settings, including teaching college and university classrooms, training in nonprofit and for-profit business environments and facilitating educational programs for community organizations.

COMS 696. Directed Graduate Research (3)

Application of knowledge to a project in a practical setting or in preparation for the completion of a thesis.

COMS 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Enrollment is required in the semester in which the comprehensive examination is taken.

COMS 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3-3)

Prerequisites: COMS 601; Classified graduate status; Consent of graduate coordinator. Open by special permission to students electing to do a thesis or graduate project in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree.

CTVA 100. Introduction to Mass Communication Arts (3)

Not open to students with credit in JOUR 100. Survey of the fields of radio, television and film as they relate to other mass media. Comparative analysis and evaluation, including historical, societal, legal and individual considerations. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

CTVA 210. Television-Film Aesthetics (3)

TV and film communicative art forms. Representative films and television programs are exhibited and analyzed. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.) (IC)

CTVA 220. Foundations of Media Writing (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Required of all pre-majors. Basic introductory course in writing for the film and electronic media, with emphasis on preparing scripts in proper formats. Includes a writing evaluation component as part of the course requirement.

CTVA 230. Fundamentals of Audio Production (3)

Introductory course in audio production. Training in digital production, audio console operation, use of tape recorders and microphones, tape editing, program formats and announcing. Lab with accompanying lecture, 6 hours per week.

CTVA 240. Fundamentals of Video Production (3)

Basic introduction to all aspects of television studio production, audio and video; microphones, audio recorders, cameras, lenses, switching and lighting equipment. Principles of graphics and scenery. Lab with accompanying lecture, 6 hours per week.

CTVA 250. Fundamentals of Film Production (3)

Prerequisite: ART 250. Introductory course in Television-Film Production. Use of film as a creative medium and art form in mass communication, using 16mm production techniques. 6 hours lab per week.

CTVA 260. Introduction to Digital Filmmaking (3)

This course provides an introduction to the basic techniques and aesthetics of motion picture production and editing with an emphasis on digital media. Areas of focus include developing, writing, directing, producing, shooting and editing a narrative short project in a digital format. Not available for credit to Film Production, Film Production-Provisional or Television Production majors. …

CTVA 301. Design of the Media Message (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 100, CTVA 210 and CTVA 220. Fundamentals of researching and designing the informational media program. Principles of determining audience needs, research, analysis and design, and program structure as they apply to documentaries, motivational programs and other educational and propaganda messages. Regular written assignments required.

CTVA 305. History of Broadcasting (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Radio and television broadcasting: beginnings, development, commercial and noncommercial support, regulations, impact on society, programming and future of telecommunications.

CTVA 309. Film as Literature (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of the art of the cinema in order to establish a unique visual literature with its own critical standards. Feature films of various types and from diverse sources are screened. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

CTVA 310. History of American Cinema (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Lower division writing requirement. History of the development of American cinema: formats, film aesthetics, societal impact, evolution as an entertainment medium. Screening and evaluation of representative films.

CTVA 315. New Directions in Electronic Media Systems (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210. Examination of electronic media systems for program production and dissemination, as well as implications for producers, regulators and society as a whole.

CTVA 319. Criticism in Cinema and Television Arts (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Lower division writing requirement. Analysis of social, cultural, literary and moral aspects of radio, television and film. Examination of media as distributors of information, propaganda and entertainment. Regular written assignments required, including the writing of critical analyses.

CTVA 320. Writing for Film and Television (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Basic dramatic screenwriting techniques for television and film. Disciplines of plot construction, characterization and dialogue are examined.

CTVA 327. Writing for Industrial Media (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 220. Theory, history and principles of writing industrial film and television programs for business, government and other organized groups.

CTVA 329A-C. Program Production (1-3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. CTVA 230 is required for all students working at KCSN. Principles of management, programming and production with practical application. Students must work at least 3 hours a week for 1 unit. Maximum of 6 units allowable. (Credit/No Credit only)

CTVA 331. Producing the Documentary (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220; Grade of “B-” or higher in CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Intermediate course with a specialized foundation in development and producing that explores the theory and professional practice of documentary production. Lab with accompanying lecture, 6 hours per week.

CTVA 340. Advanced Video Production and Editing (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240. Advanced course in the creative use of television studio cameras, lighting, sound, computer graphics and editing principles in television productions, including interview and dramatic formats. Both group and individual projects are structured around theory and practice. Lab with accompanying …

CTVA 341. Single Camera Television Production (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 331 or CTVA 340; CTVA 342 or CTVA 343 or CTVA 352 or CTVA 455. Intermediate television production using applied theories and techniques of producing and directing single-camera television. 6 hours of lecture and lab activity per week.

CTVA 342. Digital Cinematography (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 355 (for film production option); grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for television production option). Advanced course with a specialized foundation in digital cinematography. The course will explore the theory and professional practice of digital cinematography for television …

CTVA 343. Television Production Sound (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220; Grade of “B-” or higher in CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Intermediate course with a specialized foundation in theory and practice of gathering and mixing sound in both single-camera and multiple-camera television production. Lab with accompanying lecture, 6 hours …

CTVA 346. Episodic Television Production (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 341. Covers the development, research, production and postproduction of a short-form episodic television narrative. Requirements include a mid-term and a group creative project consisting of the production of a multi-episode narrative from conception to completion. Lab with accompanying lecture, 6 hours per week.

CTVA 350. Film Directing (3)

Prerequisites: Film Portfolio acceptance (for film production option); grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 250 (for screenwriting option). Examination of basic creative elements and technical approaches necessary to achieve professional excellence in film direction. 6 lab hours per week.

CTVA 351. Anatomy of Film Producing (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 240 or CTVA 250. Organization and management for both independent and studio film production. Basic business procedures, financing, budgeting, distribution, exhibition, legal matters, the development of entrepreneurial skills and structure, practices and current trends of the industry.

CTVA 352. Nonlinear Digital Editing (3)

Prerequisites: Film Portfolio acceptance (for film production option); grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for television production option). Overview of the theory and practice of nonlinear editing for video and film utilizing nonlinear digital editing work stations. Examines the technical and aesthetic requirements of editing through …

CTVA 355. Intermediate Film Production (3)

Prerequisite: Film Portfolio acceptance. Intermediate course in 16mm film production, with emphasis on story and the creative use of the motion picture camera, sound, editing and other aesthetic elements. 6 hours of lab per week.

CTVA 356. Advanced Film Editing (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 355. Advanced course in postproduction film technique and aesthetics, including the analysis, application and mastery of editing styles. 6 hours of lab per week.

CTVA 357. Advanced Cinematography (3)

Corequisite: CTVA 355. Advanced course in film production techniques and aesthetics, including detailed examination of film grammar as it is created in the camera, lighting technology and practice, camera technology, optics of lenses and their effect on aesthetics, principles of composition, new technologies, computerized application and special cinematic situations (e.g., infrared, underwater and macro-cine). 6 …

CTVA 358. Advanced Film Sound (3)

Corequisite: CTVA 355 (for film production option). Prerequisite: grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for television production option). Advanced course in the theory and practice of sound gathering and mixing for motion picture production, including technical and aesthetic requirements. Use of various technologies and microphones. Presents the …

CTVA 359. Postproduction Sound Design for Film and Electronic Media (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 355 or CTVA 340. Advanced course with a specialized foundation in postproduction sound recording and mixing. The course will explore the theory and professional practice of sound design for film and electronic media. Topics include history, theory, dialogue editing, sound effects, Foley, ADR and surround sound. Dual emphasis on individual creativity and production …

CTVA 361. Computer Fundamentals for Multimedia (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 230 or CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. General introduction to computers and their use in multimedia design, production, distribution and in desktop video. Covers computer fundamentals, the use of the graphic user interface, provides an overview of …

CTVA 362. Corporate and Instructional Media (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 230 or CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Study of contemporary practices in corporate, school, medical and civic media as they relate to educational, training and motivational purposes. Examination of audience needs, objectives, design and writing, production, distribution, …

CTVA 363. Fundamentals of Immersive Production (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 260. This production course focuses on storytelling in 360-degree space through the creation of original stories written and produced as live action immersive media. Students will work in crews to create scripted narrative and/or documentary projects. 6 hours of lab per week.

CTVA 364. Interactive Production (3)

Prerequisite: ART 200. This production course focuses on the creation of interactive virtual reality and augmented reality storytelling experiences. Students will design and build immersive and interactive computer-generated spaces in which narrative, documentary and experimental stories are communicated. This class will also introduce interactivity, as it relates to storytelling, in the development of screenplays with …

CTVA 384. Electronic Media Advertising (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 301, CTVA 305 and CTVA 480. Advertising as economic support for broadcast media. Audience, market surveys, network, affiliate rate structures. Impact of Radio-TV advertising on local and national economy.

CTVA 400. Media and Society (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210. An examination of the relationship between media, culture and society with special emphasis on analyzing the function, role and responsibility of mass media in contemporary society. The course covers the social influences (e.g., economics, politics, technology, law and culture) that shape media messages and the effects of those …

CTVA 401. Mass Communications Research (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210. Inquiry into research methodology in mass communication. Emphasis on solution of research problems in areas relating to the mass media.

CTVA 405. International Broadcasting (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 301, CTVA 305 and CTVA 480. Comparative examination of broadcasting in foreign nations. Analysis of how radio and television reflect the social and political life of each country.

CTVA 410. Advanced Film Theory: Studies in Film Style (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Lower division writing requirement. Study of realistic and expressive elements as reflected in selected film and literary references. Emphasis on aesthetic implications and significance of directorial, thematic, cinematographic approaches and techniques in the film medium. Regular written assignments required. Available for graduate credit …

CTVA 412. Analysis of Classic Filmmakers (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Lower division writing requirement. In-depth analysis of the unique personal visions and creative accomplishments of specially selected film artists, studied from the point of view of technique, visual style, content and sociological implications. Regular written assignments required. Available for graduate credit with approval …

CTVA 413. Women as Filmmakers (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Lower division writing requirement. Examination of the careers and film productions of various internationally recognized women filmmakers (e.g., directors, writer/directors, etc.), focusing on their unique contributions in content and style. Emphasis on the present-day scene with films or video from France, Germany, Italy, …

CTVA 415A-Z. International Cinema (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Lower division writing requirement. In-depth analysis of the creative accomplishments of the aesthetic and socioeconomic influences on the cinematic art of a single nation or geographic region other than the U.S. Specific nations or regions will vary from semester to semester. Regular written …

CTVA 416. The Documentary Tradition in Film and Video (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210. Examination of the history, functions, ethics and aesthetics of the documentary in both theatrical and television formats. Screening of works from U.S. and international sources, including those that represent the documentary purposes of observation, analysis, persuasion and aesthetic expression. Regular critical writing assignments …

CTVA 420. Screenplay Adaptation (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 320. Advanced development of student skills and techniques, with emphasis on the adaptation of a published literary work. Available for graduate credit with approval of CTVA graduate coordinator.

CTVA 421. Writing the Short Film (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 320 and instructor consent (for screenwriting option); grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 355 and instructor consent (for film production option). Must be taken prior to submission of the senior film proposal. For those who intend to write short film screenplays to be used for senior …

CTVA 422. Writing the Episodic Series (3)

Prerequisites: Grades of “C” or better in CTVA 220 and CTVA 240 (for Television Production majors); grade of “C” or better in CTVA 320 (for Screenwriting majors). Corequisite: CTVA 341 (for Television Production majors). Intensive writing workshop in which students examine components of successful episodic series. Final project consists of an original, short-form pilot script …

CTVA 425. Advanced Screenwriting (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 420. Advanced problems in writing drama, program specials. Available for graduate credit with approval of CTVA graduate coordinator.

CTVA 428. Writing Screenplay Comedy (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 320. An examination of the theory, spectrum and structures of comedy, as well as the writing of comedy scenes and screenplays. Available for graduate credit with approval of CTVA graduate coordinator.

CTVA 440. Theory and Techniques of TV Directing (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, CTVA 240 (for television production option); grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 320 (for screenwriting option). Theories and techniques of TV directing. Unique characteristics of video as they affect the art of directing. Screening and critique of representative TV programs.

CTVA 441. Directing the TV Documentary (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 331 and CTVA 341. Capstone course using applied theories and techniques of producing and directing television documentary. Lab with accompanying lecture, 6 hours per week.

CTVA 442. Television Thesis Production (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 346. Capstone course using applied theories and techniques of producing and directing television comedy and drama programs. 9 hours lab per week.

CTVA 452A. Senior Film Project I (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 355 and the following: CTVA 356 or CTVA 357, or both CTVA 358 and CTVA 359, or CTVA 455, and senior standing. Approval of instructor required. Capstone course using applied theories and techniques of film production. 6 hours per week.

CTVA 452B. Senior Film Project II (1)

Prerequisites: CTVA 452A. Approval of instructor required. Corequisite: CTVA 453. Application of advanced theories and techniques of film postproduction through marketing and distribution phases of a finished film. 3 hours per week.

CTVA 453. Advanced Film Postproduction (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 452A. Corequisite: CTVA 452B. Application of advanced theories and techniques of film postproduction and participation in finished film productions. Approval of instructor required. 6 hours per week.

CTVA 455. Principles of Production Management (3)

Corequisites: For Television Production majors, CTVA 340; for Film Production majors, CTVA 355. This course explores the theory and practice of managing live-action media productions. Students will study the most efficient and economic ways to schedule shoots, negotiate business deals for crews, locations and technical equipment, and make day-to-day production decisions to ensure that productions proceed …

CTVA 461. Interactive Multimedia Development (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 361; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Development, creation and integration of multimedia elements for entertainment, consumer and corporate products. Introduction to design parameters, preproduction (design documents, budgets, schedules), production, postproduction (testing plans) and implementation. Regular computer assignments required. Lab, 6 hours.

CTVA 462. Intermediate Immersive Production (3)

Prerequisites: ART 364, CTVA 363, CTVA 364. This advanced course expands on skills and techniques specific to immersive production, both cinematic and interactive. Multiple exhibition formats and new technologies will be introduced. 6 hours of lab per week.

CTVA 463CS. Emerging Media Capstone (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 462. This production course focuses on service learning through collaboration with community partners to conceptualize, design and execute transmedia projects. Strong communication skills, organization, and time management will be key to successful partnerships and final portfolio ready work. Offers a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented.

CTVA 464. Multimedia Design (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 361; completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study the basic theories and techniques of multimedia production. Covers establishment of goals and objectives, program design and production practices, project validation and utilization. Lab, 6 hours.

CTVA 467. The Management of Postproduction for Television and Film (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Advanced course on the management processes involved in postproduction, including scheduling and budgeting, setting up and managing an edit room and planning and carrying out cost-effective on-line, sound mixing, color correction and titling …

CTVA 468. Multimedia Production (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 361. Production of a multimedia program. Lab with accompanying lectures, 6 hours per week.

CTVA 475. Audience Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Lecture/discussion of mass audiences and the techniques used to study their wants, needs, motives, attitudes, opinions and behavior. Survey of audience measurement techniques.

CTVA 480. Electronic Media Management (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Study of business problems of station operations. Stress placed on case studies of stations.

CTVA 481. Network Practices (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 301, CTVA 305 and CTVA 480. Network as unique development in broadcasting, its role in distribution of information and the national economy.

CTVA 482. Network Program Development (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 305. Theoretical and practical problems in producing current network television programs. Available for graduate credit with approval of CTVA graduate coordinator.

CTVA 483. Emerging Media Programming and Practices (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 301, CTVA 305 and CTVA 480. The business of emerging media programming and practices as a unique development in broadcasting, its role in the distribution of television and film programming and impact on the national economy. Available for graduate credit with approval of CTVA graduate coordinator.

CTVA 487. Social Controls and Regulation of Electronic Media (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100, CTVA 210, CTVA 220, and CTVA 240 or CTVA 250 or CTVA 260. Legal and social controls in the regulation of electronic media, including broadcasting, cable television, common carriers and communication satellites. Regulatory efforts of federal agencies, such as the FCC, and controlling influences of public …

CTVA 489. Strategic Media Management (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 301, CTVA 305, CTVA 480 and two of the following courses: CTVA 384, CTVA 405, CTVA 467, CTVA 481 or CTVA 483. Senior capstone seminar. Integrating functional media business disciplines of management, marketing, economics, content creation and distribution, audience analysis, finance, accounting, and media law. Detailed examination …

CTVA 494A/B. Internship (1/2)

Prerequisite: CTVA majors who are seniors in good academic standing only–approval through application and instructor consent. Corequisite: CTVA 494A and CTVA 494B. Students earn 3 units by enrolling in CTVA 494A (1 unit) and CTVA 494B (2 units) concurrently. Extensive on-the-job training in specific areas of Radio, TV, or Film production or administration. Academic Internship Course. CTVA …

CTVA 494C/D. Internship (1/5)

Prerequisite: CTVA majors who are seniors in good academic standing only–approval through application and instructor consent. Corequisite: CTVA 494C and CTVA 494D. Students earn 6 units by enrolling in CTVA 494C (1 unit) and CTVA 494D (5 units) concurrently. Extensive on-the-job training in specific areas of Radio, TV, or Film production or administration. Maximum 6 …

CTVA 495A-Z. Current Trends in Television and Film (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CTVA 100 and CTVA 210; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Investigation of selected contemporary issues and practices in television and film. Emphasis on analysis of current trends, ethical issues and specialized operations in the entertainment business. These courses utilize industry professionals sharing their expertise in focused …

CTVA 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3)

Prerequisite: One year of appropriate lower division courses in CTVA. Course content to be determined.

CTVA 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Only courses at the 400-, 500- or 600-level carry credit toward the master’s degree in Screenwriting.

CTVA 500. Theory and History of Cinema and Electronic Media (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate status. Survey of the history of cinema/electronic media, as well as cinema and electronic media theory and criticism, from the silent era through the 1950s.

CTVA 505. Contemporary Film Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate status. Exploration of screen story structure and the screenwriting tools of dramaturgy used in contemporary motion pictures to impact audiences emotionally and intellectually. Effective story outlining paradigms are investigated, and story strengths and weaknesses are analyzed. Written film analysis assignments are required.

CTVA 510. Screenplay Scene Writing (3-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate status. Investigates the techniques and dramatic tools used to write powerful scenes for the screen. Emphasis on the creation of fully dimensional characters, use of visual elements, tempo, timing, descriptive style, and dialogue. This workshop course is product-oriented and students complete a screenplay project. May be repeated once for credit.

CTVA 525. Seminar in Screenwriting (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 425, CTVA 501. Identification and analysis of the student writer’s creative strengths and weaknesses. Format includes exercises and original screenplay material specifically designed to strengthen narrative skills.

CTVA 595A-H. Studies in Mass Communication (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate status. Graduate studies in Cinema and Television Arts Mass Communication. Faculty members will lead a small group of students in the study of the following general areas with exact content to be determined. Course Title CTVA 595A Advanced Research CTVA 595B History CTVA 595C Theory CTVA 595D Writing Episodic Television CTVA 595E TV …

CTVA 625. Writing the Feature-Length Screenplay (3-3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 505, CTVA 525. In this course, screen story structure creation undertaken in CTVA 525 will be continued to the completion of a feature-length screenplay. This is a product-oriented course. May be repeated once for credit.

CTVA 692. Thesis Script Preparation (3)

Prerequisite: CTVA 525. Instruction in the steps of thesis publication and individual guidance in developing original story ideas into full outlines for thesis screenplays. The first act of a feature-length thesis script is also written as preparation for final thesis completion and publication in CTVA 698C. This is a product-oriented course.

CTVA 694A/B. Internship (1/2)

Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor. Corequisite: CTVA 694A and CTVA 694B. Students earn 3 units by enrolling in CTVA 694A (1 unit) and CTVA 694B (2 units) concurrently. Intensive on-the-job training beyond the entry level in film, television and/or allied industries. CTVA 694A and CTVA 694B may be repeated concurrently once for credit. (Credit/No Credit …

CTVA 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 501, CTVA 602; Approval of graduate advisor.

CTVA 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: CTVA 500, CTVA 602; Approval of sponsoring faculty member.

JOUR 100. Mass Communication (3)

Not open to students with credit in CTVA 100. Survey and analysis of newspapers, books, magazines, radio, television, popular music, movies, advertising, public relations, the Internet and emerging technologies. Examines media history and economics, as well as their roles, rights and impact in contemporary society. Particular emphasis on media literacy, critical thinking, research and writing. …

JOUR 104. Introduction to Journalism (1)

This first-year seminar introduces the Journalism department’s traditions and expectations, as well as resources and opportunities to help students as they move through the major. Students will meet faculty, get to know campus media operations, clubs and career options and learn about the program’s writing, ethics and other academic standards. (Credit/No Credit only)

JOUR 110/L. News Reporting I and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: Keyboard, typing proficiency. Corequisite: JOUR 110L. Basic news gathering and writing. Includes interviewing, speech/meeting coverage, preparing news copy, and traditional- and electronic-information gathering as applied to news decision making. Introduces ethics as part of developing news judgment and learning the values practiced by professional …

JOUR 210/L. News Reporting II and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 110/L. Corequisite: JOUR 210L. Continuation of news reporting, with coverage of public affairs beats, including police, courts and government. Writing primarily in print, but also in broadcast news, online news and public relations formats. Ethics emphasized. Off-campus reporting and statistical journalism included. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

JOUR 225. Multimedia Storytelling (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 110/L. Recommended Preparatory Courses: JOUR 100, JOUR 250. An introduction to multimedia storytelling and online news production. Techniques for gathering, reporting and producing news using digital and social media. Legal and ethical issues in digital media and other emerging journalistic practices.

JOUR 250. Visual Communication (3)

Survey of the most significant techniques and examples of visual communication in the mass media, including social media and the Internet, newspapers, magazines, photography, typography, graphic design, animation, television, cinema and advertising. Particular emphasis on critical thinking, visual and cultural literacy, and on the perception of visual media messages and their impact on culture and …

JOUR 255. Introduction to Public Relations (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in the lower division writing requirement. Practical approach to public relations, including its history, career paths, campaign planning process, theory and methods. Includes concepts of planning and executing effective strategies, integrating message design and distribution.

JOUR 310. Feature Writing (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 210/L and JOUR 225. Feature reporting and long-form storytelling, including the use of digital media and digital media platforms. Analysis and application of the practice and aesthetics of narrative journalism, the techniques of in-depth reporting, and an emphasis on the newer forms of explanatory storytelling.

JOUR 315. Broadcast Reporting (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 210/L and JOUR 225. Corequisite: JOUR 325. Broadcast news writing, radio reporting and producing of live and recorded daily newscasts and other programming. Use of digital tools and emerging practices in class and in the KCSN Newsroom. 6 hours of classroom and lab activity.

JOUR 325. Multiplatform Storytelling (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 225 and JOUR 250. Students in this advanced digital-media class will learn to produce text, audio, video and social media to create and disseminate digital stories and engage audiences across multiplatforms.

JOUR 335. Writing, Producing and Editing Television News (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 315 and JOUR 325. Television news writing, editing and producing. Developing news judgment, ethics and newsroom skills. Editing and writing to video, anchoring. Students produce weekly newscasts, followed by discussion and critique. 4 hours of classroom and lab activity.

JOUR 341. Writing for Public Relations (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 210/L and JOUR 255. Intensive writing instruction, integrating a variety of public relations techniques using a journalistic tone for a diverse audience.

JOUR 350. Photojournalism (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 225; Students are required to have access to a camera and laptop. Technical, aesthetic, ethical and legal aspects of photojournalism. Emphasis on the production of narrative still images, using digital platforms for editing and dissemination.

JOUR 362. Public Relations Campaigns (3)

Prerequisites: JOUR 255 and JOUR 341. Plan, design and implement a comprehensive public relations campaign, including conducting research and evaluating results.

JOUR 365. News Literacy (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Preparatory: JOUR 100. Analysis of news and information. Development of news literacy skills to evaluate sources, bias, opinion, transparency and other attributes. First Amendment, culture of journalism, participatory media and democracy. Regular written assignments required. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.) (IC)

JOUR 371. Gender and Media (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines media representation of gender and sexual identity and ways in which the media culture shapes gender roles, expectations, and stereotypes. Particular emphasis on applying critical thinking, research and writing skills to analyze gendered portrayals, policies and practices in television, film, magazines, music, video games, news, advertising, …

JOUR 372. Diversity and the Media (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Analysis of media portrayals and audience perceptions of racial, ethnic and sociopolitical groups, and the roles and responsibilities of mainstream and specialty media in a democratic society. Particular emphasis on applying critical thinking, research and writing skills to analyze media policies and practices and on developing strategies …

JOUR 374SLJ. Spanish-Language News Environment (3)

The course is a survey of Latino-oriented and Spanish-language news media and of the news coverage of Latinos and Spanish-language communities. The course provides students with a general understanding of contemporary Spanish-speaking and Latino communities. Conducted in English.

JOUR 375. Engaging Diverse Communities (3)

Prerequisites: JOUR 210/L and JOUR 225. Engagement and multimedia journalism skills, including in-depth reporting, social media and online surveys. Analysis of demographics, community institutions and social issues, to generate engagement with diverse communities with media. Creation of critically informed, visual representations.

JOUR 390. Freedom of the Press (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Not available for those with credit in JOUR 400. Designed for non-journalism majors. Legal rights and privileges of the mass media under the Constitution. Censorship and control of the press. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

JOUR 395B. Broadcast News Practicum (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 315 and JOUR 325. Corequisite: JOUR 395C. Radio and television news reporting and production. Emphasizes the development of professional broadcast skills necessary to work as a team under deadline pressure, and the evolution of ethical news judgment, particularly in choosing news stories and sources. 6 hours of …

JOUR 395C. Broadcast News (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 315 and JOUR 325. Corequisite: JOUR 395B. Radio and television news reporting and production. Emphasizes the development of professional broadcast skills necessary to work as a team under deadline pressure, including the evolution of ethical news judgment, particularly in choosing news stories and sources. 2 hours lecture.

JOUR 397A. Newspaper Practicum (1)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 for writers and reporters and in JOUR 330 for editors. Supervised work on the department daily newspaper. Students work as writers, reporters, photographers and editors. 3 hours of activity per unit per week.

JOUR 397B. News Practicum (2)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 or JOUR 350, and JOUR 325. Corequisite JOUR 397C. Advised work on the department’s student newspaper. Students create content as multimedia journalists for The Sundial digital and print editions. Emphasizes the development of professional journalism skills to work under deadline pressure and employing ethical news judgment, …

JOUR 397C. News—The Sundial (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 or JOUR 350 and JOUR 325. Corequisite: JOUR 397B. Advised work on the department’s student newspaper. Students create content as multimedia journalists for The Sundial digital and print editions. Emphasizes the development of professional journalism skills to work under deadline pressure and employing ethical news judgment, …

JOUR 398B. Public Relations Practicum (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 255 and JOUR 341. Corequisite: JOUR 398C. Hands-on experience for students to conduct professional-level public relations activities on behalf of Agency 398’s nonprofit clients, including social media management, event planning, production of press releases along with other media materials. 6 hours of activity per week required.

JOUR 398C. Public Relations—Agency 398 (2)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 255 and JOUR 341. Corequisite: JOUR 398B. Hands-on experience for students to conduct professional-level public relations activities on behalf of Agency 398’s nonprofit clients, including social media management, event planning, production of press releases along with other media materials. 2 hours lecture.

JOUR 400. Media Law and Ethics (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing required. Not available for students with credit in JOUR 390. Examination of laws and ethics that provide the liberties, rights and responsibilities of the media and others in the digital era. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 410. Investigative Reporting (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 or JOUR 315. Researching, reporting, writing and producing investigative stories on societal, governmental and scientific issues for print, broadcast or online media. Ethical issues, problems, traditional techniques and technological approaches to investigative journalism. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 415. Reporting for Television News (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 315 and JOUR 325. Reporting, writing, editing and producing for television news. Fundamentals of television news field reporting, writing, researching, interviewing and editing complete narrative packages. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 430. Public Affairs Journalism (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 315. Advanced journalism students report, write and produce On Point, a weekly news and public affairs multiplatform program that explores diverse current and in-depth topics and issues for a local audience. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 440. Public Relations Management (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 362. One of the most important functions in public relations is the management function. Directs the management of constituents, customers, journalists and media. Includes public relations theory and analysis of historical and contemporary case studies. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 445. Advanced Television News (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 335 and JOUR 415. Reporting, writing, editing, anchoring and producing television newscasts for airing on cable or television. Students produce weekly newscasts in a professional environment, followed by critique and discussion. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours of classroom and lab activity.

JOUR 450. Advanced Photojournalism (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 350. Advanced instruction in the techniques and ethics of photojournalism. Emphasis on reporting and narrative construction for the photojournalist. Includes the production of picture stories, photo essays and the preparation of a professional portfolio. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 455. Documentary Photojournalism (3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 350. Production course that guides the student to a discovery and use of the principles of investigation and reporting on a subject in depth. Production of photographic images are supported by a survey of the major journalistic documentary projects in still photography. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 460. Magazine Journalism (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 330. Principles, problems and techniques of magazine editing and design; production of department magazine; and nonfiction article research and writing. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours of scheduled classroom and lab activity required.

JOUR 465. Mass Communication and Popular Culture (3)

Study of the social, political and economic influences that shape popular culture and its effects on audiences. Examines media’s roles as storytellers. Particular emphasis on applying critical thinking, research and writing skills to analyze media policies and practices and on developing strategies that empower consumers in the media. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 474SLJ. Spanish-Language Media Writing (3)

Prerequisites: Upper division level of Spanish-language; JOUR 210/L or instructor approval. The course will guide students in the methods and styles of reporting and writing in Spanish for print and broadcast. It will prepare students to take part in the Journalism Department’s media practica. Conducted in Spanish. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 478. International News Media (3)

Study of news media systems and the influence of government, economics, culture and propaganda on international news practices. Examines the role of multinational media organizations. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 480. History of the American News Media (3)

Study of the development and influence of the news media in the U.S. from colonial times to the present. Examines social, economic, cultural, technological and political influences on news media development. Special attention to dominant media personalities. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 491. Media Leadership (3-3)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 395B and JOUR 395C; or JOUR 397B and JOUR 397C; or JOUR 398B and JOUR 398C. Newsroom leadership. Students will develop, produce and disseminate content, leading teams and managing workflows between and across the department’s diverse student media platforms. Available for graduate credit. May be repeated once …

JOUR 494AEE/BEE. Internship (1/2)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 315 or JOUR 330 or JOUR 335 or JOUR 341. Supervised employment, field study or on-the-job training in contemporary news media and public relations operations. AEE and BEE must be taken together and the combination can be taken only once. Available for graduate credit. (Credit/No Credit only)

JOUR 495A-Z. Selected Topics in Journalism (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in JOUR 310 or JOUR 315. Advanced research, writing and reporting of selected journalistic styles and/or subject matter. Ethical issues, problems, traditional techniques and technological approaches are integral segments of each selected topic. Subject content will change from semester to semester. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Journalism (1-3)

Prerequisite: One year of appropriate coursework in Journalism. Experimental courses in journalism, with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

JOUR 498. Senior Project (1)

Prerequisite: Graduating senior standing. Capstone course for Journalism majors, usually taken the final semester before graduation. Individual, supervised study in selected areas of students’ interest, resulting in completion of a capstone portfolio project.

JOUR 585. Theory of Mass Communication (3)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status. Extended analysis of the theories which inform the study of mass communication. The course focus is on contemporary theories but is grounded in a historical understanding of the development of theory in the field.

MCOM 600. Seminar in Research Methods (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status. Scope and methods of research in mass communication, including review of literature, statement of research problem, research design, collection and analysis of data and information, and writing the research report.

MCOM 612. Journalism Practices (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate status in the Mass Communication program. Students acquire and apply professional journalism practices that may include visualizing and analyzing data sets, investigative reporting, long-form reporting and other in-depth research techniques.

MCOM 620. Seminar in Media Criticism (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status. Analysis of books, journal articles and other reviews that deal with contemporary mass communication.

MCOM 630. Seminar in Analysis of Media Performance (3)

Prerequisite: MCOM 600. Extended application of research and evaluation techniques as used in mass communication research to describe the quality of news media performance.

MCOM 635. Multimedia Journalism (2)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Mass Communication. Multimedia Journalism is a skills-based class in which students learn how to produce mobile digital content for journalism projects using personal technology devices.

MCOM 690. Research Practicum (3)

Prerequisite: MCOM 600. Instruction and individualized guidance in the preparation of thesis or project proposals, including introduction, literature review and methodology.

MCOM 693A-Z. Selected Topics in Journalism and Mass Comm (3)

Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor. Advanced examination of selected topics in journalism and mass communication, with course content to be determined by department faculty.

MCOM 694C. Internship (3)

Prerequisites: MCOM 600; Approval of sponsor.

MCOM 696. Directed Graduate Research (3)

Directed Graduate Research

MCOM 697A. Comprehensive Written Exam (1)

Written and oral examination in the major field (Mass Communication) and two specified fields selected with the approval of the Graduate Committee. One of those specialized fields may be outside the Department of Journalism.

MCOM 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3-3)

Prerequisites: MCOM 690; Approval of sponsor.

MCOM 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: MCOM 600; Approval of sponsor.

MUS 100. Music Fundamentals (3)

An introduction to the study of music theory. The course will include learning to read treble, alto, tenor and bass clefs; notation of pitches and rhythms on staff systems; reading and writing intervals, triads and scale systems, in addition to melodic and rhythmic structures. Basic solfege and rhythm reading also will be addressed.

MUS 105. Understanding Music (3)

History of Western music traditions, examining musical style and structure, relationships with other art forms and aspects of their roles in Western culture. Lecture, listening, discussion and outside concert attendance. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

MUS 106HH. Hip Hop Music (3)

A survey of Hip Hop music, with an emphasis on its musical elements and influences. Students will acquire the appropriate vocabulary necessary to analyze Hip Hop music and trace its development as a form of human expression and its relationship with the media. Lecture, listening and discussion. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

MUS 107. Music Today (3)

Survey of music in our society, including selected material from rock, jazz, pop, folk, traditional, show, film and art styles, as well as the impact of technology on today’s musical life. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

MUS 108. Music in Film (3)

Exploration of the role of music in films as it stimulates the emotional response to the visual aspects of the art form; examination of the historical evolution of film scoring; and examination of the role of the composer in joining sonic art with visual art. Film clips, both historical and contemporary, illustrate the principles developed. …

MUS 110A. Keyboard Musicianship I (1-1)

Prerequisite: Music majors and Musical Theatre minors only. Introduction of fundamental keyboard skills and piano playing, sight-reading, transposition, literature, improvisation and analysis emphasizing five-finger techniques. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 110B. Keyboard Musicianship II (1-1)

Prerequisite: Music majors and Musical Theatre minors only. Expansion of content to include scales, keyboard harmony and harmonization, use of pedals, playing by ear, and transposition emphasizing octave playing. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 111/L. Musicianship I and Lab (1/1)

Development of basic skills in music making, including ear training, sightsinging, conducting exercises and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 112/L. Musicianship II and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: MUS 111/L. Corequisite: MUS 112L. Development of basic skills in music making, including ear training, sight singing, conducting exercises, melodic and rhythmic dictation, and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 120/L. Arts Immersion: Music and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the ITEP Freshman option program. Introduction to the study of music based on the Visual and Performing Arts Framework for California Public Schools. Concepts of music are explored through materials and skills appropriate for use in elementary classrooms. Music fundamentals are applied through the development of skills in singing and …

MUS 130. Guitar Sight-Reading (1-1)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MUS 111/L. Drills to train eyes, ears, and hands. Study of staff notation and musical symbols through ensemble performance of simple 1-, 2- and 3-part pieces. Development of a harmonic vocabulary through open position chords and their transposition.

MUS 131A-B. First-year Piano (1-1)

Prerequisite: Not open to Music majors; For students with no piano experience. MUS 131B continues the development of keyboard skills and may be taken by students who already read music on the elementary level. For development of piano appreciation and skill. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 132A. Functional Keyboard Skills I (1)

Prerequisite: B.M. piano major, B.A. piano emphasis or by permission of instructor. Development of essential keyboard skills, including sight reading, playing by ear, harmonization, open score reading, transposition and improvisation at the keyboard. 2 hours lab per week. (Substitutes for MUS 110A.)

MUS 132B. Functional Keyboard Skills II (1)

Prerequisites: B.M. piano major, B.A. piano emphasis and a grade of “C-” or higher in MUS 132A or by permission of instructor. This course emphasizes advanced skills needed by keyboard majors including sight reading, playing by ear, harmonization, open score reading, modulation, transposition, figured base and improvisation at the keyboard. 2 hours lab per week. …

MUS 133A. Beginning Guitar (1)

Beginning techniques and repertoire in classical guitar. Intended for non-majors. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 140-159A,B. Individual Lessons (1-1, 2-2)

A numbers are for B.A. degree students; B numbers for B.M. degree students. Concurrent enrollment in the appropriate major performance ensemble is required. To be taken with department-approved instructors only. Not open to non-majors. Course Title Units A Units B MUS 140 Flute A: (1-1) B: (2-2) MUS 141 Oboe A: (1-1) B: (2-2) MUS …

MUS 168. Steel Drum Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Learning the playing techniques and performance practices of the steel drum ensemble through application to performance of repertoire appropriate for this group. For majors and non-majors. 2 hours weekly.

MUS 170. University Chorus (1-1-1-1)

Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature. For majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 172. Northridge Singers (2-2-2-2)

Prerequisite: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature. Designed for voice majors and students with advanced vocal experience. 6 hours per week.

MUS 173. Master Chorale (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of literature for chamber choir. For students with advanced vocal experience. 3 hours per week.

MUS 177. Women’s Chorale (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature for women’s voices. 3 hours per week.

MUS 178. African Music Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Performing ensemble focusing on selected traditional African music cultures. Students learn performance practices and playing techniques and apply them to performance of repertoire appropriate for this group. Open to majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 179A. Symphonic Wind Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Study and performance of musical literature written for winds and percussion, with stylistic and historical emphasis. 3 hours per week.

MUS 179B. Symphonic Wind Ensemble (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Study and performance of musical literature written for winds and percussion, with stylistic and historical emphasis. 4 hours weekly. Minimum of 2 hours per week rehearsal outside of class is required.

MUS 181A. Jazz Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Rehearsal and performance of literature written for large jazz ensemble. 3 hours per week.

MUS 181B. Jazz Ensemble (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Rehearsal and performance of literature written for large jazz ensemble. 4 hours per week. Minimum of 2 hours per week rehearsal outside of class is required.

MUS 182. Symphonic Orchestra (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques as they relate to the performance of representative orchestral literature. 6 hours per week.

MUS 187. Percussion Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Rehearsal and performance of standard percussion ensemble literature, including quartets, quintets, sextets and large ensembles.

MUS 189. Jazz Combo (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Small jazz groups of three to seven players performing repertoire commonly associated with the jazz idiom. Emphasis on improvisational skills.

MUS 191/L. Fundamentals of Music Technology and Lab (2/1)

Preparatory: MUS 111/L or equivalent. Corequisite: MUS 191L. Introduction to uses, concepts, techniques and terminology of computing through music applications. Experience with current hardware and software for music notation, sequencing, synthesis and music performance and practice. Consideration of ethical, aesthetic, economic and social problems in technology applications. (Available for Music majors as General Education, Lifelong …

MUS 201. Style/Literature of Western Music I (3)

Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Survey of Western art music from pre-Renaissance to 1800, emphasizing styles and trends within each historical era.

MUS 202. Style/Literature of Western Music II (3)

Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Survey of Western art music from 1800 to the present, plus 20th-century U.S. vernacular developments. (Available for Music majors as General Education, C1 Arts.)

MUS 210A. Keyboard Musicianship III (1)

Preparatory: MUS 110B. Third semester group piano instruction. Continued development of skills introduced in MUS 110B. Special emphasis on performance and interpretation of piano compositions in various styles. Basic skill development in choral and instrumental score reading, sight-reading accompaniments and developing improvisations in 2- and 3-part forms. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 210AJ. Keyboard Musicianship III—Jazz (1)

Preparatory: MUS 110B. Continuation of keyboard musicianship development using melodic, rhythmic and harmonic materials characteristic of the jazz idiom. For Jazz Studies majors—others by permission only.

MUS 210B. Keyboard Musicianship IV (1)

Preparatory: MUS 210A. Fourth semester group piano instruction. Continued development of skills introduced in MUS 110B. Special emphasis on performance and interpretation of piano compositions in various styles. Basic skill development in choral and instrumental score reading, sight-reading accompaniments and developing improvisations in 2- and 3-part forms. 2 hours lab per week. Music Education majors take MUS …

MUS 210BJ. Keyboard Musicianship IV—Jazz (1)

Preparatory: MUS 210AJ. Continuation of keyboard musicianship development using melodic, rhythmic and harmonic materials characteristic of the jazz idiom. For Jazz Studies majors—others by permission only.

MUS 211/L. Musicianship III and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 213. Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Development of basic skills in music making, including ear training; sight singing; melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation; conducting exercises; and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 212/L. Musicianship IV and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 214. Preparatory: MUS 211/L. Development of basic skills in music making, including ear training; sight singing; melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation; conducting exercises; and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 213. Harmony I (3)

Corequisite: MUS 211/L. Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Diatonic harmony, non-chord tones, and voice leading. Melodic invention, harmonization, simple accompaniments and elements of form.

MUS 214. Harmony II (3)

Corequisite: MUS 212/L. Preparatory: MUS 213. Chromatic harmony, modulation, keyboard and instrumental styles.

MUS 214J. Harmony II: Jazz (3)

Harmonic concepts as applied in the jazz/pop/rock idioms, including chord alterations, chord extensions, polychords, quartal chords, chord substitutions and modulations. For students in Jazz Studies Option.

MUS 219A-B. Jazz Improvisation I and II (1-1)

I. Corequisites: MUS 211/L, MUS 213. Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Fundamentals of improvisation for vocalists and instrumentalists. Includes introduction to nomenclature, basic chord progressions and application of scale and chord devices. 2 hours lab per week. II. Corequisite: MUS 214J. Preparatory: MUS 219A. Theory and performance of blues forms and jazz modes. Beginning exploration of various …

MUS 221. Song Writing (2)

Preparatory: MUS 211/L, MUS 213. Analysis of representative hit song literature for principles of structure and content. Development of application skills through assignments.

MUS 227. Japanese Taiko Drumming Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

A performing ensemble that focuses on Japanese and Japanese-American drumming. Students will learn performance practices and playing techniques, and apply them to performance of repertoire appropriate for this group. Open to majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 232C. Advanced Keyboard Skills (1)

Prerequisite: MUS 132B. The emphasis in this course is on advanced skills needed by keyboard majors for accompanying and sightreading, including score reading, improvisation, harmonization, figured bass, and transposition. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 235A-D. Contemporary Keyboard Styles (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: MUS 110B or MUS 131B or MUS 150A or MUS 150B. Study of idiomatic keyboard performance practices in various contemporary music styles. Course accommodates intermediate through advanced piano skill levels. The following sections are offered in various semesters: (A) Latin; (B) Jazz/Rock/Pop; (C) Afro-Cuban; (D) Gospel and other sacred popular styles.

MUS 238A-B. Elements of Vocal Technique (1-1)

Group work in the fundamental techniques of singing. Problems of tone production, breath control, diction, repertoire and interpretation. Open to all students. 2 hours lab per week. Music Education majors must take MUS 338A.

MUS 240-259A,B. Individual Lessons (1-1, 2-2)

Preparatory: Successful completion of 100-level lessons and/or repertoire standards established by the Music department. With department-approved instructors only. A numbers are for B.A. degree students, B numbers for B.M. degree students. Concurrent enrollment in the appropriate major performance ensemble is required. Course Title Units A Units B MUS 240 Flute A: (1-1) B: (2-2) MUS …

MUS 266. Foundations and Field Observation in Music Education (2)

Examination of the philosophical, historical and traditional foundations of school music programs in the U.S. Also, guided observation in school music classes at elementary-, junior high/middle school- and high-school levels 2 hours weekly. For students entering or considering music teaching as a career.

MUS 276. Keyboard Accompanying Practicum (1-1-1-1)

Experience in accompanying individuals or groups in studio and rehearsal settings, plus in subsequent performance. Time commitment comparable to ensemble participation.

MUS 282. Musical Theatre Performance Techniques (1-1)

Corequisite: MUS 238A or Music majors enrolled in Applied Voice Lessons. The development of techniques that combine singing with acting, physicalization and movement to create expressive and cohesive performances. The class will focus on musical theatre repertoire carefully chosen to maximize each student’s strengths, both vocally and dramatically. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 287. Chamber Music Techniques (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required. Detailed study of chamber music repertoire; performance and rehearsal techniques. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 291. Alexander Technique (1)

Identification and analysis of habitual movement patterns that cause excessive muscle tension and strain during music practice and performance. Understanding and application of basic principles of neuromuscular re-education developed by F.M. Alexander. Intended for Performance majors.

MUS 292. Music Therapy Orientation (2)

Introduction to the field of music therapy and overview of its applications in various clinical settings.

MUS 293/L. Field Experience in Music Industry and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Overview of the music industry through on-site observation and interviews of working industry professionals. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.

MUS 296A-Z. Experimental Topics in Music (1-3)

Selected topics in music, with content to be determined.

MUS 302. Jazz History (2)

Preparatory: MUS 112/L. Study of the history and stylistic development of the jazz idiom in American music. For Jazz Studies and Music Industry Studies majors.

MUS 303A. History of Popular Music in America I: Money and Markets (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. In this first semester of a two-semester study of the History of American Popular Music, the focus will be on the examination and analysis of traditional, current, potential, and alternative income streams for songwriters, recording artists, publishers, record labels, performers, and other players in the pop music industry, with special emphasis …

MUS 303B. History of Popular Music in America II (3)

Preparatory: MUS 303A, Upper division standing. Survey of popular music in America from the birth of rock ‘n’ roll to present day popular music, emphasizing the repertoire, stylistic development, and cultural relevancy of each musical genre, as well as the role of the music industry and technology in popular music production, promotion, and distribution.

MUS 304. Music and Child (1)

Prerequisite: Limited to students in the ITEP Freshman option program. Preparatory: MUS 120. Course provides students opportunity to revisit music and apply their knowledge of this area to working with children. Experiences will include planning, teaching and assessing music lessons in field-based settings. Students will engage in critical analysis and reflection to discover ways to …

MUS 306. Introduction to Jazz (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of the development of Jazz, with emphasis on the influence of historical and socioeconomic factors. Includes stylistic analysis of Jazz and its musical elements in order to develop musical awareness. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

MUS 307. Music from a Global Perspective (3)

Preparatory: Upper division standing. Survey of music as a global phenomenon. Study of the rich musical contributions indigenous to or having origin in diverse traditions, such as those found in African, Middle Eastern, Pacific Rim and Latin American cultures. Development of a multicultural perspective that examines: (1) its structure and performance practices; and (2) its …

MUS 309. Traditional Music of the U.S. (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In-depth study of musical traditions identified with representative ethnic groups in the U.S. Course examines musical structure and performance practices, as well as functions and implications of the music within the cultures involved. Regular written assignments required. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.) (IC)

MUS 310. Understanding World Cultures Through Music (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In-depth study of several representative non-Western music cultures. Course examines musical structure and performance practices, as well as functions and implications of the music within the cultures involved. Regular written assignments required. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.) (IC)

MUS 311/L. Musicianship V and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: MUS 212/L. Development of basic skills in music making, including ear training; sight singing; melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation; conducting exercises; and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 311J/L. Musicianship V: Jazz and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: MUS 212/L. Development of basic skills in jazz music making, including ear training, sight singing; melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation; conducting exercises; and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 312/L. Musicianship VI and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 312L. Preparatory: MUS 311/L. Development of basic skills in music making, including ear training; sight singing; melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation; conducting exercises; and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 312J/L. Musicianship VI: Jazz and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: MUS 311J/L. Development of basic skills in jazz music making, including ear training; sight singing, melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation; conducting exercises; and fundamental terminology. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 314. Tonal Counterpoint (3)

Preparatory: MUS 214. Composition and analysis of contrapuntal forms in the 18th century style of J.S. Bach, including two- and three-voice melodic combinations.

MUS 315A. Orchestration I (2)

Preparatory: MUS 214. Theory, practice, terminology and notation of writing and arranging for instruments, from chamber ensembles to small orchestra.

MUS 316. Musical Analysis (3)

Preparatory: MUS 214. Analytic techniques for the study of balance in the organization of musical material.

MUS 317A. Jazz Arranging I (2)

Preparatory: MUS 214J. Melody construction, harmonizing a given melodic line, writing for rhythm section, instrumentation, two- and three-part writing techniques and basic formal structures.

MUS 317B. Jazz Arranging II (3)

Preparatory: MUS 317A. Four-and five-part writing, advanced forms and structures, advanced orchestration techniques and study of five “classic” arrangements.

MUS 319A. Jazz Improvisation III (1)

Preparatory: MUS 219B. Theory and performance of jazz styles from 1920 to 1960. Special emphasis on musicianship, styles, concepts and literature.

MUS 319B. Jazz Improvisation IV (1)

Preparatory: MUS 319A. Theory and performance of jazz styles from 1960 to the present. Focus on performance practices of various styles.

MUS 321. Beginning Composition (2)

Corequisite: MUS 311/L. Preparatory: MUS 214. Beginning exercises in basic techniques of composition, with an emphasis on imitating the styles of the great composers of art music in the 20th century.

MUS 322. Beginning Composition for Media (2)

Preparatory: MUS 321. Principles of writing for films and television. Studies in the styles of major film and TV composers.

MUS 327. Japanese Taiko Drumming Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

A performing ensemble that focuses on Japanese and Japanese-American drumming. Students will learn performance practices and playing techniques ,and apply them to performance of repertoire appropriate for this group. Open to majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 334. Stringed Instruments (1)

Class instruction in violin, viola, cello and string bass. Familiarization with the bowed string instruments and beginner’s presentation methods. Required for Music Education option; others admitted if space permits. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 335. Woodwind Instruments (1)

Class instruction in woodwind instruments. Correct embouchure, tone production and execution. Knowledge of basic playing techniques and fingerings on all woodwind instruments. Required for Music Education option; others admitted if space permits. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 336. Brass Instruments (1)

Class instruction in brass instruments. Correct embouchure, tone production and execution. Knowledge of basic playing techniques and fingerings on all brass instruments. Required for Music Education option; others admitted if space permits. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 337. Percussion Instruments (1)

Class instruction in snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, timpani, mallet instruments and accessories, with particular emphasis on teaching techniques and equipment selection. Required for Music Education option; others admitted if space permits. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 338A. Elements of Vocal Technique (1-1)

Group work in the fundamental techniques of singing. Problems of tone production, breath control, diction, repertoire and interpretation. Open to all students. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 339ABD. Diction for Singers (1,1,1)

Preparatory: MUS 339A is prerequisite to MUS 339B/D. Systematic study of diction as it pertains to the sung traditions of English, Italian, German and French. Emphasis is placed on the development of a process for mastering the textual line, which includes the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Practical application through the performance of the …

MUS 340-359A,B. Individual Lessons (1-1, 2-2)

Preparatory: Successful completion of 200-level individual lessons and/or repertoire standards established by the Music department. A numbers are for B.A. degree students, B numbers for B.M. degree students. To be taken with department-approved instructors only. Concurrent enrollment in the appropriate major performance ensemble required. Course Title Units A Units B MUS 340 Flute A: (1-1) …

MUS 360/L. Functional Music Skills for Therapy and Lab (2/1)

Utilization of music in program development at community cultural centers, recreation centers and senior citizen centers. Includes song materials and song-leading activities with such instruments as guitar, autoharp, hand bells and Orff instruments. Emphasis on lifelong learning through musical participation and creativity. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 361/L. Music Literature for Children and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: MUS 361L. Development of fundamentals and principles for selecting, evaluating and performing music literature for children grades K-6, and the place of music in the child’s education. For Liberal Studies and Child and Adolescent Development majors. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 362/L. Music for Early Childhood and Lab (2/1)

Survey and performance of music literature suitable for children ages 3 through 8. Development of principles for organizing curriculum materials. For Liberal Studies and Child and Adolescent Development majors. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 363/L. Choral Conducting and Arranging and Lab (2/1)

Preparatory: MUS 212/L. Development of conducting techniques for choral ensembles, with supervised practical application. Score study of choral literature appropriate for various levels. Principles of arranging for middle- and high-school level groups, with practical assignments.

MUS 364/L. Instrumental Conducting and Arranging and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: MUS 364L. Preparatory: MUS 212/L. Development of basic to advanced conducting skills with instrumental focus. For preparation of the conductor and the public-school music teacher. Topics include baton, rehearsal, score study techniques, error detection and resultant strategies. Also, principles of arranging for middle- and high-school level ensembles, with practical application.

MUS 368. Steel Drum Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Learning the playing techniques and performance practices of the steel drum ensemble and applying them to performance of repertoire appropriate for this group. Open to majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 369. Field Band Techniques (1)

Organization, implementation and administration of marching band programs. Training of the band, percussion section and color guard. 2 hours per week.

MUS 370. University Chorus (1-1-1-1)

Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature. For majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 372. Northridge Singers (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. For voice majors and students with advanced vocal experience. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature. 4 hours per week.

MUS 373. Master Chorale (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through performance of literature for chamber choir. 3 per hours week.

MUS 377. Women’s Chorale (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature for women’s voices. 3 hours per week.

MUS 378. African Music Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Performing ensemble that focuses on selected traditional African music cultures. Students learn performance practices and playing techniques and apply them to performance of repertoire appropriate for this group. Open to majors and non-majors. 3 hours per week.

MUS 379A. Symphonic Wind Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Study and performance of musical literature written for winds and percussion, with stylistic and historical emphasis. 3 hours per week.

MUS 379B. Symphonic Wind Ensemble (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Study and performance of musical literature written for winds and percussion, with stylistic and historical emphasis. 4 hours weekly. Minimum of 2 hours per week rehearsal outside of class is required.

MUS 381A. Jazz Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Rehearsal and performance of literature written for large jazz ensemble. 3 hours per week.

MUS 381B. Jazz Ensemble (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Rehearsal and performance of literature written for large jazz ensemble. 4 hours per week. Minimum of 2 hours per week rehearsal outside of class is required.

MUS 382. Symphonic Orchestra (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of orchestral literature. 4 hours per week.

MUS 387. Percussion Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Rehearsal and performance of standard percussion ensemble literature, including quartets, quintets, sextets and large ensembles.

MUS 388. Studio Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Lab orchestra for media writing majors and performing ensemble, playing/recording original and arranged commercial music. Student and faculty conductors. Guest conductors from the industry.

MUS 389. Jazz Combo (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: Audition. Small jazz groups of three to seven players performing repertoire commonly associated with the jazz idiom. Emphasis on improvisational skills.

MUS 390MI. Music Therapy Improvisation (2)

An in-depth look at various models of improvisation that are practiced in the music therapy profession. Theoretical concepts will be explored via class demonstrations and exercises.

MUS 391/L. Music Technology II and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: MUS 191/L. Corequisite: MUS 391L. An in-depth, hands-on exploration of the current approaches to creating music using computer software and related hardware. Topics include sound, digital audio, MIDI sequencing, audio loops, software instruments, synthesis, sampling, sound design, sound processing, and synchronization to digital video. 2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week.

MUS 392/L. Music in Therapy and Lab (3/1)

Corequisite: MUS 392L. Preparatory: MUS 292. Basic approaches and techniques of music therapy applied in mental health programs. A study of the structural design of a music therapy program in various professional settings. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 393A. Music Industry Studies I: Copyright, Publishing, and Licensing (3)

Preparatory: Upper division standing. The first semester of a two-semester study of the functions, organizational structures, business principles, economics, customs and practices, and terminology associated with each major sector of the music industry. The first semester will concentrate on copyright law, music publishing and licensing.

MUS 393B. Music Industry Studies II: Music Industry Contracts (3)

Prerequisite: MUS 393A. The second semester of a two-semester study of the functions, organizational structures, business principles, economics, customs and practices, and terminology associated with each major sector of the music industry. The second semester will focus on the various contracts that form the backbone of the music industry, including: recording, publishing, co-writing, producer, and …

MUS 396A-Z. Experimental Topics in Music (1-3)

Selected topics in music, with course content to be determined.

MUS 397R/L. Sound Recording and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: MUS 191/L. An in-depth study of the theory and practice of sound recording utilizing industry-standard hardware and Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) software. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 403. Vocal Literature (2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Survey and stylistic analysis of solo vocal literature from the pre-Classic period to the present. Emphasis on listening and recognition of the literature. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 404. Symphonic Literature (2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Masterpieces of literature for the symphony orchestra. Classic, romantic and contemporary developments; study of scores and recordings. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 405. Wind Literature (2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Survey of literature for wind instruments in settings for solo, chamber ensembles and large groups. Emphasis on development and application of criteria for selecting and grading “band” literature for practical use. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 406A-B. Fretboard Literature (2-2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Survey of pre-guitar and guitar literature including a study of style characteristics within the major historical periods. (A) Pre-guitar through Baroque; (B) Classical to the present. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 407A. Keyboard Literature I (2)

Prerequisites: MUS 201, MUS 202. This class is designed to study the history and literature for keyboard instruments (early keyboards up to the fortepiano) from the Middle Ages and Renaissance through the Classical era, with an emphasis on evolving styles and forms, such as the simple keyboard forms of the Renaissance written for the early …

MUS 407B. Keyboard Literature II (2)

Prerequisites: MUS 201, MUS 202. This class is designed to study the history and literature for keyboard instruments (fortepiano and piano) from the Romantic era to the present, with an emphasis on evolving styles and forms, such as the national schools of the 19th century and some defining theoretical trends of the 20th. The material covered …

MUS 409. Chamber Music Literature (2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Development of forms and survey of the literature for string trios, quartets, quintets and other small combinations. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 410. Percussion Literature (2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Study of the use of percussion in the classic orchestra, romantic orchestra and in contemporary settings. Solo literature for percussion instruments. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 411. History of Performance Practices (2)

Preparatory: MUS 201, MUS 202. Study of conditions, methods, techniques, and styles of performance. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 415. Orchestration II (3)

Preparatory: MUS 315. Intensive study of the art of orchestration, emphasizing the creative and inventive side. Study of specific problems of scoring for chamber ensembles and symphony orchestra. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 416. Advanced Musical Analysis (2)

Preparatory: MUS 316. Analysis of organization, balance and style in larger works of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 418. Electronic and Computer Music Composition (2)

Prerequisites: MUS 191/L and MUS 214, or consent of instructor. Recommended Preparatory: MUS 321. The history, theory and practice of electronic and computer music composition and performance. The principles and procedures of composition in various electronic media are explored through compositional exercises, reading, listening and discussion. Special attention is paid to live and interdisciplinary works …

MUS 419. Music Industry Foundations (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division status. A detailed study of the structure and practices of the music industry, focusing on music copyright, publishing, licensing and performing rights organizations. Also includes study of music’s interaction with other entertainment industries. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 420A. Composition for Film and TV (3)

Preparatory: MUS 322. Study of the aesthetic considerations and practical techniques involved when composing music for films and TV. Lectures, analysis, field trips to TV and film studios, and practical application. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 420B. Advanced Media Orchestration (3)

Preparatory: MUS 420A. Advanced work in analysis and composition for film and TV. Studies in current styles and techniques. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 421. Advanced Composition (2-2-2)

Preparatory: MUS 321. Advanced studies in art music composition in a seminar/masterclass format. Available for graduate credit. Available for repeat credit.

MUS 422A. Individual Lessons in Composition (1)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Open to Composition and Media Composition majors only. The study of music composition in a course of individual weekly lessons requiring writing music for a variety of instruments, ensembles, and media. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 427. Performance Techniques (1)

Development of techniques for enhancing stage performance by vocalists. Integration of acting and movement skills that increase the flexibility of the physical components of vocal performance. For vocal majors only; may be taken by freshman and sophomores with the permission of the instructor; may be repeated once for credit. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 428. Opera Workshop (1)

Problems of opera production; presentation of typical operatic ensembles and scenes. For vocal majors only; may be taken by freshman and sophomores with the permission of the instructor; may be repeated once for credit. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 432/L. Master Class: Piano and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 432L. Preparatory: Upper division standing. Performance, discussion and study of literature from the Baroque period to the present, with emphasis on the evolving elements of style and problems of interpretation. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 433/L. Master Class: Guitar and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 433L. Preparatory: Upper division standing. Performance of pre-guitar and guitar literature, including a study of style characteristics within the major historical periods. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 435/L. Master Class: Winds and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: Upper division standing. Performance, discussion and study of solo and small ensemble literature for wind instruments, with emphasis on contemporary solutions to stylistic idioms and analyzing problems of interpretation. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 437/L. Master Class: Percussion and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: Upper division standing. Performance, discussion and study of percussion literature, past and present, with emphasis on evolving elements of style and on analyzing problems of interpretation. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 440-459A,B. Individual Lessons (1-1, 2-2)

Preparatory: Completion of 300-level individual study and/or repertoire standards established by the Music department. A numbers are for B.A. degree students; B numbers are for B.M. degree students. Concurrent enrollment in the appropriate major performance ensemble is required. Study must be with department-approved instructors. Available for graduate credit. Course Title Units A Units B MUS 440 …

MUS 461A/L. Elementary Piano Pedagogy and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 461AL. Preparatory: Completion of sophomore piano requirements for Music major. Foundations and principles of piano pedagogy. Emphasis on the development of methodology and standards in piano teaching and the development of practical teaching strategies. Supervised practice piano teaching is provided. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 461B/L. Advanced Piano Pedagogy and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: MUS 461BL. Preparatory: MUS 461A/L. Presentation and analysis of intermediate and advanced procedures for piano instruction. Supervised practice piano teaching is provided. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 462/L. Guitar Pedagogy and Lab (1/1)

Preparatory: 300-level in individual study. Presentation and analysis of beginning and intermediate procedures for guitar instruction and suggested sequences of learning. Performances of the materials are encouraged, and guided practice in guitar teaching is provided. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 464. String Pedagogy (2)

Preparatory: 300-level on principal instrument. Study of issues and techniques relevant to teaching bowed string instruments. Practical application with students included. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 465. Wind Pedagogy (2)

Preparatory: 300-level on principal instrument. Study of the principles, techniques, materials and procedures effective for individual and group wind instrument instruction. Emphasis on the development of philosophy, methodology and applied teaching strategies. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 467. Percussion Pedagogy (2)

Preparatory: 300-level in individual study. Comprehensive study of current literature and techniques in the field of percussion instruction, including snare drum, cymbals, timpani, mallet instruments, drumset and accessory instruments. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 468. Pedagogy of Singing (2)

Preparatory: 300-level in individual study. Study of vocal physiological function and procedures for vocal production in individual and group singing. Survey of suitable materials for beginning instruction. Course includes reading assignments, supervised teaching experiences and on-site studio and choral rehearsal observations. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 473/L. Choral Methods and Practicum and Lab (2/1)

Preparatory: MUS 363/L. Intensive preparation course for teaching choral music in schools (elementary, middle, high school). Includes examination of appropriate literature, and study of pedagogical, organizational and management procedures for the rehearsal classroom. Practicum component: Supervised teaching experience with peers and with on-site groups. 2 hours weekly. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 474/L. Instrumental Methods and Practicum and Lab (2/1)

Preparatory: MUS 364/L. Intensive preparation course for teaching instrumental music in schools (elementary, middle, high school). Includes examination of appropriate literature, and study of pedagogical, organizational and management procedures for the rehearsal classroom. Practicum component: Supervised teaching experience. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 476. Keyboard Accompaniment Practicum (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: 300-level individual study. Experience in accompanying individuals or groups in studio and rehearsal settings, plus in subsequent performance. Time commitment comparable to ensemble participation. Not available for graduate credit.

MUS 477. Music Therapy Practicum (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: MUS 292. Supervised clinical experience in Music Therapy in a variety of settings and client populations. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 478A/L. Piano Pedagogy Resources and Practicum and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: MUS 461B/L. Study and analysis of intermediate and advanced piano literature, business procedures, and pedagogical and technological aids for the piano teacher. Application of literature, teaching aids and software in supervised and individual and group teaching situations, in a wide variety of settings and at various levels of advancement. Available for graduate credit. 1 …

MUS 478B/L. Directed Teaching in Piano Pedagogy and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: MUS 478A/L. Application of literature, teaching aids and software in supervised group teaching situations, in a wide variety of class piano settings and at various levels of advancement. Study and analysis of piano literature, pedagogical and technological aids for the piano teacher for use in group settings. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 2 …

MUS 479. General Music Practicum (1)

Preparatory: MUS 266. Guided practical experience in planning and teaching general music classes in elementary and middle school. Also includes development of prescribed competency in guitar and recorder. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours per week.

MUS 483ME/L. Music Entrepreneurship and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Corequisite: MUS 483MEL. Development of analytical, organizational, cross-platform, research and presentation skills needed to acquire entrepreneurial acumen to assist in creating successful career opportunities in music. Through discussions, guest speakers and fieldwork, students learn how governments, foundations, demographics and philanthropic trends affect society. Students develop abilities to innovate and integrate their …

MUS 484. Piano Ensemble (1-1-1-1)

Preparatory: 300-level individual study. Rehearsal and performance of piano ensemble music, including duets and duo-piano music, with emphasis on style and rehearsal techniques. For advanced pianists. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 485. The Discovery Players (1-1-1-1)

Study, rehearsal and performance of chamber vocal and instrumental works outside of the commonly performed repertoire. Special emphasis is given to 14th-17th and 20th century music, including student compositions. Limited instruction on period instruments available as part of the course. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 487. Chamber Music Techniques (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required. Detailed study of chamber music repertoire, performance and rehearsal techniques. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 488A-B. Advanced Opera Performance (2-2)

Preparatory: Audition. Musical and dramatic preparation of an operatic role from a selected historical period, striving for a complete integration of music and action, culminating in public performance. Study of the role’s traditional and historical style and practice. Available for graduate credit. 4 hours lab per week.

MUS 491. Psychology of Music (3)

Preparatory: MUS 292. Inquiry into the application of music to the more recent developments in psychology. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 492/L. Influence of Music on Behavior (3/1)

Preparatory: MUS 292. Study of music as a form of human behavior and the fundamental constructs for the use of music as a therapeutic medium. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 493C. Music Industry Practicum (1-1)

Prerequisites: MUS 393B; Upper division standing. Supervised on-campus study focused on experiential learning through participation in a student-run, faculty-advised record label. Required to be repeated once for credit over consecutive Fall and Spring semesters. 3 hours lab per week. Students may substitute MUS 466, 2 units of internship (either two semesters of MUS 494A or …

MUS 494A-C. Internship in Music (1-3)

Prerequisite: Limited to students in the Music Industry Studies, Music Therapy, and Commercial and Media Writing options; Requires permission of internship coordinator. Students enrolled in MUS 494B (2) or MUS 494C (3) must also be concurrently enrolled in MUS 494A (1). Experiential education in various aspects of the music industry, music therapy, and commercial and …

MUS 495. Senior Recital/Project (1)

Available for graduate credit. (Credit/No Credit only.)

MUS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics in Music (1-3)

Selected topics in music, with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

MUS 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor to act as sponsor; Permission of department chair. Not to be substituted for an existing course. Evidence of ability to pursue in-depth independent study and approval of project submitted prior to registration. Available for graduate credit. Maximum 6 units may be earned.

MUS 500. Music Theory Review (3)

Intensive review course covering all phases of diatonic and chromatic harmony. Intended essentially as a review for graduate students. No credit may be earned for graduate or undergraduate degrees.

MUS 501. Music History Review (3)

Preparatory: MUS 202 or departmental approval. Comprehensive review of historical developments in Western music from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Stylistic analysis of the major areas of musical research supported by the study of scores and recordings. Intended essentially as review for graduate students. No credit may be earned for graduate or undergraduate …

MUS 565. Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Conducting (2)

Preparation of scores in the media of band, orchestra and chorus for performance. Special emphasis on effective rehearsal procedures, stylistic values and score analysis.

MUS 580. Music Industry Developments (3)

Exploration of major music industry sectors to establish an understanding of terms, concepts and principles common to the Industry. Surveys recent developments including, the music industry’s latest theories, practices and technologies. Builds students’ knowledge base while challenging them to comprehend the continually evolving nature of the music industry and its interdependence with the entertainment industry.

MUS 588B. Advanced Opera Performance (2-2-2)

Prerequisite: Audition. The musical and dramatic preparation of an operatic role from a selected historical period, striving for a complete integration of music and action, culminating in public performance. Study of the role’s traditional and historical style and practice. 4 hours lab. May be repeated twice for credit.

MUS 593. Current Trends in the Music Industry I (3)

Study of theories, concepts and principles necessary to establish foundational skills considered essential for a successful career in the music industry. Guides the development of interpersonal skills and leadership qualities needed for effectiveness in mixed artistic and nonartistic team-based business environments. Study of research techniques and quantitative/qualitative methods of analysis using varied music industry metrics.

MUS 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Music Education (1-3)

Selected topics in music education, with course content to be determined.

MUS 601. Techniques of Research and Bibliography in Music (3)

Introduction to musical research, involving bibliographical method, the tools of research and the organization and writing of research studies relevant to the interest areas of Composition, Music Education, Musicology or Performance. Graduate students generally take this course before or concurrently with the first seminar in musicology.

MUS 602. Music Industry Research, Data and Analytics (3)

Study of music industry research, data and analytic tools used to track, report, and analyze consumer behavior across a range of media.

MUS 603A-E. Seminar in Musicology (3-3-3-3-3)

Preparatory: Completion of Graduate Placement Exam in Music History. Normally MUS 601 is prerequisite to MUS 603ABC, but it may be taken concurrently with MUS 603D or MUS 603E. Each seminar includes intensive analysis and research into the repertoire, forms, styles, media, musicians, composers and performance practices of a selected period in Western music history. …

MUS 604. Seminar in Musical Analysis (3)

Preparatory: MUS 316 or equivalent; Completion of Graduate Placement Examination in Music Theory and Analysis. Study of larger musical works, including relationships of the musical structure, materials, organization and style of the aesthetic whole.

MUS 605. Teaching Music in Higher Education (3)

A study of music teaching and learning theories, a review of the stages of development of the undergraduate student, and an examination of learning styles for adults. Strategies for course organization, lecture/discussion learning techniques, and the role of the faculty member within the academic hierarchy.

MUS 625. Advanced Orchestration (3)

Preparatory: MUS 315, MUS 415 or equivalent. Intensive study of the art of orchestration with special emphasis on 20th century techniques. Study of specific problems of scoring for chamber ensembles and symphony orchestra.

MUS 630. Composition (2-2-2-2)

Preparatory: MUS 421 or equivalent. Composition in the larger forms, in contemporary style.

MUS 632/L. Graduate Piano Master Class (1/1)

Performance, discussion, and study of literature from the Baroque Period to the present, with emphasis on the evolving elements of style and problems of interpretation. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.

MUS 639A. Individual Lessons in Composition (1)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The study of music composition in a course of individual weekly lessons requiring writing music for a variety of instruments, ensembles, and media.

MUS 640-659A,B. Individual Performance Lessons (1-1, 2-2-2-2)

Course Title Units A Units B MUS 640 Flute B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 641 Oboe B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 642 Bassoon A: (1-1) MUS 643 Clarinet A: (1-1) B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 644 Saxophone B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 645 Trumpet B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 646 Horn B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 647 Trombone/Euphonium B: (2-2-2-2) MUS 649 Percussion A: (1-1) B: (2-2-2-2) …

MUS 660A. Individual Conducting Lessons (1-1)

Individual Conducting Lessons

MUS 660B. Individual Conducting Lessons (2-2)

Individual Conducting Lessons

MUS 672. Graduate Northridge Singers (1-1-1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Audition. For graduate voice majors and other graduate students with advanced vocal experience. Study of musical styles and rehearsal techniques through the performance of choral literature. 4 hours per week.

MUS 676. Collaborative Keyboard Practicum (1)

Techniques for collaborating with individuals and groups in rehearsals and performances. Students will be assigned to collaborate with individual instrumentalists, vocalists, and/or small and large ensembles. Students will meet weekly for group coachings by the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

MUS 678A/L. Graduate Piano Pedagogy Resources and Practicum/Lab (1/1)

Study and analysis of advanced piano literature, business procedures, and pedagogical and technological aids for the piano teacher. Application of literature, teaching aids and software in individual and group teaching situations, in a wide variety of settings, and at various levels of advancement.

MUS 678B/L. Graduate Directed Teaching in Piano Pedagogy and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: MUS 678A/L. Application of literature, teaching aids and software in supervised group teaching situations, in a wide variety of class piano settings and at various levels of advancement. Study and analysis of piano literature, pedagogical and technological aids for the piano teacher for use in group settings.

MUS 679. Graduate Wind Ensemble (1-1-1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Audition. Detailed study of graduate wind ensemble/concert band repertoire, performance and rehearsal techniques. 4 hours per week.

MUS 680. Music Publishing and Copyright Administration (3)

Study of traditional and online music publishing and copyright administration of art music, educational music and popular music. Study of electronic commerce as applied to music distribution and the online sale of music, games, and music-related merchandise; the implementation and operation of websites; FTC regulations; e-commerce licenses; and the exploitation of intellectual property rights.

MUS 681. Recorded Music Distribution and Promotion (3)

Study of the distribution methods and promotion tools used in the recorded music market across a variety of formats including physical products, permanent digital downloads, and digital streaming through various ad-supported and subscription service providers.

MUS 682. Graduate Symphonic Orchestra (1-1-1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Audition. Detailed study of graduate orchestral repertoire; performance and rehearsal techniques. 2 hours lab per week. 4 hours per week.

MUS 683. Entrepreneurship in the Music Industry (3)

Study of the processes and procedures involved in launching entrepreneurial enterprises that monetize music industry-related intellectual property, products and services. Emphasis on opportunity recognition, commercialization of intellectual property, use of established and developing distribution models, and organizational and capitalization structures for new ventures within the music industry.

MUS 684. Live Music Production and Promotion (3)

Study of concert production and promotion methods used in the live music market and the role of the concert promoter in producing and promoting live concert events. Includes the study of related businesses such as artist management, ticketing, tour management, tour merchandising and music products.

MUS 687. Graduate Chamber Music (1-1-1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Detailed study of graduate chamber music repertoire, performance and rehearsal techniques. 2 hours lab per week.

MUS 692A-Z. Selected Topics in Music History (3)

Prerequisite: Passing Music History Placement Test or successful completion of MUS 501; Preparatory: MUS 601. Intensive studies of special problems in music history of various historical periods. Students are expected to engage with primary sources and scholarship within the field of study, and employ critical and analytical skills of readings in short class presentations. The …

MUS 693. Current Trends in the Music Industry II (3)

Extended study of theories, concepts, and principals considered essential for a successful career in the music industry. Analysis of targeted music industry sectors on the leading edge of the evolving music industry. Analysis of varied business models and their potential to affect and influence segments of the music industry. Special emphasis on the importance of …

MUS 697. Comprehensive Examination (3)

Prerequisite: Permission of Music Industry Studies option coordinator. Comprehensive examination of the subject matter covered in the student’s graduate program. Examination will allow students to demonstrate their ability to integrate content knowledge, independent thinking and critical analysis. Only available to students who have completed or are currently completing their course requirements and have only the …

MUS 698. Thesis, Artistic Performance, or Graduate Project (3)

See Guidelines for the Preparation of Theses, Graduate Projects and Artistic Performances available from Graduate Studies. Also, see Music department requirements for the degree.

MUS 698MIA. Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisite: Classified status and permission of MIA academic lead and director of graduate programs. The MIA Graduate Project consists of small teams of students working on comprehensive consulting projects with established music industry clients under faculty supervision. Clients are selected and screened by the MIA program academic lead. (Credit/No Credit only)

MUS 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Preparatory: Classified status; Consent of an instructor/sponsor; Review by the graduate coordinator. 6 units maximum.

TH 108A. Acting I: Fundamentals (2)

This course develops foundational skills for the actor, with an emphasis on ensemble building, collaboration and creative problem solving. Acting exercises, techniques and methods from a variety of performance styles will provide a comprehensive introduction to the roles and responsibilities of actors and directors. Fundamentals of the actor’s craft, such as developing an effective work …

TH 110. Introduction to Theatre: Text/Drama/Performance (3)

Introduction to theatre through reading and discussing play scripts, analyzing dramatic forms and writing about live performances. Regular critical writing assignments and attendance at live performances are required. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

TH 111. Actors and Acting (3)

Prerequisite: Not open to Theatre majors. Introduction to theatre through an emphasis upon its central performer–the actor. Illustrative acting exercises. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

TH 120/L. Arts Immersion: Theatre and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Limited to students in the ITEP-Freshman Option. Corequisite: TH 120L. Introductory course in which students engage in the study and practice of theatre and process drama. Exploration of the role of playwright, director, designer, actor, technician and dramaturg/critic as they relate to the art of theatre and the design of drama experiences for children. …

TH 142M. Theatre Movement I (2)

Introduction to movement for performance. This course focuses on the development of individual creativity through physical expression. Movement fundamentals taught include basic anatomy, stretching and strengthening exercises, somatic practices that develop the breath/movement connection, Laban effort vocabulary and compositional projects that foster an expressive use of theatrical space. Course meets 4 hours per week.

TH 143V. Theatre Voice and Speech I (2)

Introduction to fundamentals of voice for the stage, including studio experiences exploring foundation skills in vocal production. Understanding the role of voice training in the development of the actor’s craft and introduction to the methods, systems and techniques of voice training.

TH 155. Color and Design for the Theatre (2)

This course acquaints students with the basic principles of design that govern all forms of visual expression, emphasizing those used in the theatre. It also provides students with the ability to communicate in visual terms.

TH 190. Theatre Production Participation (1-1)

Participation in various aspects of Theatre CSUN’s production program, including acting, directing, technical, or managerial assignments. May be repeated once.

TH 208A. Acting II: Character and Text (2)

Prerequisites: TH 108A, TH 142M and TH 143V. Dramatic structure; methods of text analysis for the actor; and application through lab experience to specific texts and scenes. 6 hours per week.

TH 222. Mapping World Theatre and Drama (3)

Prerequisite: TH 110. Introductory survey of theatre history and dramatic literature of the world from antiquity to the present. Critical writing assignments required.

TH 261. Fundamentals of Scenery and Properties Technology (2)

Corequisite: TH 261A. Preparatory: TH 155. Practical introduction to the theories and application of construction techniques for the scenic environment; visual language, principles, techniques and tools used in creating scenery and properties; and safety in the theatre.

TH 261A. Scenery and Properties Technology Production Participation (1)

Corequisite: TH 261. Preparatory: TH 155. Participation in the scenery and/or properties department of a CSUN theatre production.

TH 262. Fundamentals of Costume Technology (2)

Corequisite: TH 262A. Preparatory: TH 155. A practical introduction to the theory and application of costume and accessory construction for the stage, including use of equipment, fabrics and materials appropriate to costume technology.

TH 262A. Costume Technology Production Participation (1)

Corequisite: TH 262. Preparatory: TH 155. Participation in the costume department of a CSUN theatre production.

TH 263. Fundamentals of Lighting and Sound Technology (2)

Corequisite: TH 263A. Preparatory: TH 155. Introduction to technical principles and applications of stage lighting and sound, including basic lighting and sound equipment, nomenclature, and skills and practices used in creating lighting and sound for stage productions.

TH 263A. Lighting and Sound Technology Production Participation (1)

Corequisite: TH 263. Preparatory: TH 155. Participation in the scenery and/or properties department of a CSUN theatre production.

TH 290. Theatre Production Participation (1-1)

Participation in various aspects of Theatre CSUN’s production program, including acting, directing, technical or managerial assignments. May be repeated once.

TH 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Theatre (1-3, 1-3)

Prerequisite: Consult Theatre department office. Experimental courses in theatre, with course content to be determined. May be repeated once.

TH 304. Process Drama and the Child (1)

Prerequisites: TH 120; Restricted to students in the ITEP-Freshman Option. Provides students the opportunity to revisit Theatre and apply their knowledge of this area to working with children and develop skills as a leader of drama experiences for children through the practice of planning, implementing and evaluating drama experiences with peers and in the context …

TH 308A. Acting III: Scene Study (3)

Prerequisite: TH 208A. Corequisites: TH 342M, TH 343V. Studio course emphasizing text analysis, character development and scene study; application of these skills to modern and contemporary dramatic texts. 6 hours per week.

TH 310. Theatre in Performance (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Not open to Theatre majors. Introduction to the theatre through the experience of attending performances, preparatory lectures and post-performance discussions and critiques. Critical writing assignments required. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

TH 321A. World Theatre and Drama I (3)

Prerequisite: TH 222. This course is the first part of an integrated study of world theatre and drama. It encompasses theatre history and dramatic literature of Asia, Africa and Europe. Critical writing assignments required.

TH 321B. World Theatre and Drama II (3)

Prerequisite: TH 222. This course is the second part of the integrated study of the world theatre and drama. It encompasses theatre history and dramatic literature of the Middle East, Latin America and the West. Critical writing assignments required.

TH 325. World Drama and Performance (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement and upper division standing. Not open to Theatre majors. Survey of world dramatic literature and performance styles from the Ancient world to the present, with particular focus on the cultural, political, social and aesthetic factors that shaped these works. We will examine masterpieces from Western and non-Western …

TH 333. The American Musical (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This class is a survey of Western musical theatre history, drama and practices from late 19th century through modern day. Students will analyze the role of musical theatre in the culture of the United States by examining the context of changes and trends in American musical theatre …

TH 338. Improvisation (2)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: TH 308A. Introduces various techniques of improvisation for rehearsal and performance, and their application to the craft of acting and the development of original performance work. Meets 4 hours per week.

TH 342M. Theatre Movement II (3)

Prerequisite: TH 142M. Intermediate training of the body for stage movement, including exercise for strength, flexibility, relaxation, control, physicalization and movement as a part of character development. 6 hours lab.

TH 343V. Theatre Voice and Speech II (3)

Prerequisite: TH 143V. Intermediate theory and practice of voice and speech in the theatre. Exercises in stage diction, vocal techniques and phonetics. 6 hours lab.

TH 345. Acting On Camera (3)

Prerequisite: TH 208A or permission of instructor. Non-Theatre majors, consult department for equivalency. Prepares the student for the particular demands of acting in front of the camera. Techniques of blocking, text analysis, cold-reading, character presentation, scene preparation, vocabulary and camera shots. 6 hours per week.

TH 346. Musical Theatre Workshop I (3)

Prerequisites: MUS 238A; TH 208A. Study of the special acting, vocal and movement skills required for performance in musical theatre. 6 hours per week.

TH 350. Cultural and Historical Perspectives for Theatre (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major. Preparatory: TH 321A/TH 321B. Historical elements as they relate to the staging of period plays, including history of architecture, furniture, costume, social modes and manners. Development of dramaturgical research skills. Extensive writing and analysis required.

TH 355. Principles of Stage Design (2)

Prerequisites: Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major. Non-Theatre majors, consult Theatre department advisor. Introduction to the discursive and non-discursive aspects of stage design, including process, techniques and language of collaborative production artists and conceptualization of dramatic action, mood and style through a range of media. Extensive critique of work in progress. 4 hours …

TH 361A. Intermediate Scenery and Properties Technology (2)

Prerequisites: TH 261, TH 261A. Intermediate principles of realizing technical designs for the stage, including construction technology, finishing, rigging and materials. Required participation in a University-sponsored production.

TH 362A. Intermediate Costume Technology (2)

Prerequisites: TH 262, TH 262A. Intermediate principles of theory and application of costume construction for the stage, including use of equipment, fabrics and materials appropriate to costume technology. Required participation in a University-sponsored production.

TH 362B. Intermediate Costume Crafts (2)

Prerequisites: TH 262, TH 262A. Intermediate principles of theory and application of costume crafts for the stage, including use of equipment, fabrics and materials appropriate to costume accessory and craft making, and preparation of appropriate accessories. Required participation in a University-sponsored production.

TH 363A. Intermediate Lighting Technology (2)

Prerequisites: TH 263, TH 263A. Non-Theatre majors, consult department advisor for equivalency. Intermediate course exploring stage lighting, projection equipment, lighting control systems, optical systems, color theory and current lighting graphic standards as they apply to stage, film and video. Required participation in a University-sponsored production.

TH 367. Advanced Makeup (2)

Prerequisite: Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major. Practical experience in the application and design of makeup for the stage. Required participation in a University-sponsored production.

TH 371/L. Creative Drama and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: TH 371L. Theory and techniques for developing the creative capacities of children and young people through dramatization; participation and leadership in creative drama. 4 hours per week.

TH 376. Production Preparation and Performance: Theatre for Young Audiences (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Audition/Interview. Preparation and performance of a University-sponsored production for young audiences. May be taken up to three times for credit.

TH 381. Management Techniques for the Theatre (2)

Prerequisite: Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major. Basic principles in management, with emphasis on theatrical applications; personnel, time, budgeting, procedures, organization, safety; setting and achieving objectives. 6 hours per week.

TH 382A-C. Theatre Management Practicum (1-3)

Prerequisites: TH 381; Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major. Practical application of theatre management techniques. Required participation in a University-sponsored production. Maximum of 3 units may be earned.

TH 384. Touring Theatre (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Audition/Interview. Theory and practice in the artistic and management aspects of producing theatrical performances for touring, including practical experience in producing and presenting touring productions. Required participation in a University-sponsored production. May be taken up to three times for credit.

TH 385. Stage Management (2)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. An exploration of the profession of stage management. Provides the student with an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of a stage manager, and through the review of the production process, provides training in the techniques used by professional stage managers.

TH 390A-C. Theatre Production Participation (1-3)

Participation in various aspects of Theatre CSUN’s production program, including acting, directing, technical or managerial assignments. Maximum of 4 units may be earned.

TH 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Theatre (1-3, 1-3)

Prerequisite: Consult Theatre department office. Experimental courses in theatre, with course content to be determined. Maximum of 6 units may be earned.

TH 397. Theatre Honors Tutorial (1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Admission to Theatre Honors Program. Intensive investigation in a small group of a topic related to some aspect of theatre practice or theory. Maximum of 3 units may be earned.

TH 408A. Acting IV: Advanced Acting (3)

Prerequisites: TH 308A and completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major. Not available for graduate credit. Performance course emphasizing advanced text analysis, character development and scene study as applied to a wide variety of periods and genres. Available for graduate credit. 6 hours per week.

TH 422. Theatre and Drama of Greece and Rome (3)

Prerequisites: TH 321A/TH 321B; Theatre major or minor. Non-Theatre majors, consult department advisor for equivalency. Study of the history and literature of the theatre of Greece and Rome. Critical writing assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

TH 426. Contemporary Theatre and Drama of Europe and America (3)

Prerequisites: TH 321A/TH 321B; Theatre major or minor. Non-Theatre majors, consult department advisor for equivalency. Study of contemporary theatre movements in Europe and America. Critical writing assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

TH 433. The Musical Theatre in the United States (3)

Prerequisite: Theatre major or minor with upper division standing. Study of the history and literature of the musical theatre in the U.S. from its beginnings to the present. Critical writing assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

TH 444. Principles of Directing (3)

Prerequisites for Theatre major: Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre major; Senior standing. Prerequisites for Theatre minor: Completion of lower division requirements in Theatre minor; Senior standing. Not available for graduate credit. Theories and techniques of directing plays. 6 hours per week.

TH 448. Advanced Acting for the Camera (3)

Prerequisite: TH 345. Students practice the tools and techniques of film and television acting in specific and varied contexts. Specific focus will be given to artistic genres, distinctions between commercial and theatrical work, single and multiple camera formats, and other shooting styles.

TH 449. Tutorial in Performance Skills (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Audition. Not available for graduate credit. Diagnosis of individual strengths and weaknesses in performance skills through individual tutorials directed at improvement of skills and correction of problems. Complements work in CSUN’s Theatre production program. May be repeated 3 times. (Credit/No Credit only)

TH 454. Advanced Directing/Acting: Collaborative Studies (3)

Recommended Preparatory: TH 308A, TH 342M, TH 343V or TH 444. Audition required. Advanced study of directing and acting via collaborative practice. With attention to the director-actor relationship, scenes from diverse periods and genres are rehearsed and presented, applying a range of practical approaches, from the traditional to the latest theatrical trends. Emphasis on collaborative interpretation and …

TH 457. Theatre Design Tutorial (3-3-3)

Prerequisites: TH 350, TH 355, TH 357. Individual work in theatre design, with emphasis on scenery, costumes, or lighting. Focuses on developing and presenting design concepts for selected theatre productions. May be repeated twice. Portfolio review required for repeat credit. Maximum of 3 units may be earned for graduate credit.

TH 473/L. Dramatic Performance in the Secondary Language Arts Curriculum and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Corequisite: TH 473L. Study and practical application of dramatic performance in secondary-education language arts curriculum. Introduction to and application of artistic and aesthetic tools and sensitivities required for creative expression. Available for graduate credit. (Fulfills General Education, C1 Arts for English Subject Matter Program majors only.)

TH 490A-C. Theatre Production Participation (1-2-3)

Prerequisite: Not available for graduate credit. Participation in various aspects of CSUN’s Theatre production program, including acting, directing, technical or managerial assignments. Maximum of 4 units may be earned. Available for graduate credit.

TH 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Theatre (1-3, 1-3)

Prerequisite: Consult Theatre department office. Not available for graduate credit except when specifically approved by the department. Consult the director of graduate studies. Experimental courses in theatre, with course content to be determined. Maximum of 6 units may be earned.

TH 498F. Senior Honors Project or Thesis (3)

Prerequisites: Theatre Honors Program; Approved project or thesis proposal. Not available for graduate credit. Completion of an artistic project or writing of a thesis resulting from the investigation of a significant topic or problem in theatre. (Credit/No Credit only)

TH 530. Theatre and Drama of Latin America (3)

Prerequisites: TH 321A/TH 321B; Theatre major or minor. Non-Theatre majors, consult department advisor for equivalency. Study of the history and literature of the Latin American theatre from pre-Columbian times to the present. Critical writing assignments required.

TH 531. Theatre and Drama of Asia (3)

Prerequisites: TH 321A/TH 321B; Theatre major or minor. Non-Theatre majors, consult department advisor for equivalency. Study of the history and literature of the Asian theatre from the beginnings to the present. Critical writing assignments required.

TH 535. Theatrical Theory and Criticism (3)

Prerequisites: TH 321A/TH 321B; Theatre major or minor. Non-Theatre majors, consult department advisor for equivalency. Study of the history of theatrical theory and criticism from antiquity to the present. Major theories pertaining to all aspects of theatrical production, including staging, acting, scenography and the script is examined. Critical writing assignments required.

TH 544. Principles of Directing (3)

Theories and techniques of directing plays. 6 hours per week.

TH 545. Advanced Directing (3)

Prerequisite: TH 444. Advanced study of theories and styles of directing plays. Practical experience through production of scenes from different historical periods. 6 hours per week.

TH 594. Internship in the Arts (3-3)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing; Portfolio review or audition; Instructor consent. Academic Internship course. May be repeated once. Maximum of 3 units may be earned for graduate credit. (Credit/No Credit only)

TH 599A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: Completion of all core requirements in Theatre major; Instructor consent to serve as sponsor; Permission of the department chair. Enrollment restricted to Theatre majors who have completed the full sequence of courses in the area of study to be pursued by independent study. Not open to classified graduate students. Maximum of 6 units may …

TH 600. Seminar in Research Methods and Bibliography in Theatre (3)

Introduction to theatre research, involving bibliographical methods, the tools of research and the organization and writing of the research study.

TH 601. Pedagogy and Performance: Teaching Theatre in Higher Education (3)

Corequisite: TH 600. This course is an advanced introduction to pedagogical theories and practices in theatre and performance. It is designed to provide graduate students with knowledge of major trends in the field of teaching theatre and performance, with a particular focus on teaching theatre in the context of higher education.

TH 620. Seminar in Theatre History (3)

Prerequisites: TH 600; Advanced course in theatre history/literature (TH 422 through TH 535, or equivalent). Investigation of selected problems in theatre history from antiquity through the present. Consideration of theatre architecture, audiences, staging and production, acting and performance organization.

TH 621. Seminar in Theatrical Literature (3)

Prerequisites: TH 600; Advanced course in theatre history/literature (TH 422 through TH 535, or equivalent). Investigation of selected problems in theatrical literature from antiquity to the present. Consideration of the text, playwright, theatrical genres and periods and movements.

TH 625. Seminar in Popular Theatre and Entertainment (3)

Prerequisite: TH 600. Investigation of selected popular theatrical and para-theatrical forms of theatre and entertainment from antiquity through the present. Consideration of relationships between popular theatre and formal literary theatre.

TH 630. Seminar in Theatre Aesthetics (3)

Prerequisites: TH 600; Advanced course in directing or design (TH 457, TH 545 or equivalent). Analysis of the aesthetic principles and techniques of the theatre, including selected problems in the philosophy of dramatic art.

TH 640. Seminar in Acting and Directing (3)

Prerequisites: TH 600; Advanced course in acting or directing (TH 408A, TH 545 or equivalents). Selected theoretical problems and their application to acting and directing.

TH 670. Seminar in Child Drama (3)

Prerequisites: TH 600; TH 371, TH 475 or equivalent experience. Examination of child drama theories and practices, including creative drama and theatre for children.

TH 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status; Approval of appropriate area faculty to form a thesis or graduate project committee; Formation of an approved thesis or graduate project committee; Completion of all additional requirements for the degree. (Credit/No Credit only)

TH 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status; Consent of an instructor to serve as sponsor; Review by the department director of graduate studies. Maximum of 6 units may be earned.