UNIVERSITY CATALOG: 2020-2021

Courses

AFRS 099. Writer’s Workshop (1)

1 unit University credit; No credit toward graduation. Emphasizes the development of the individual student’s writing abilities with intensive practice in basic writing skills, including grammar, usage and other aspects of the composing process. May be taken by students who wish to improve their writing skills, whatever the level. 2 hours lab per week. (Credit/No …

AFRS 100. Introduction to Black Studies and Culture (3)

Overview of Black culture, including history, religion, social organization, politics, economics, psychology, and creative production, with a survey of the key concepts and fundamental literature in each area. The discipline of Africana Studies is also presented in terms of its origins and distinguishing theories and methods. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, …

AFRS 113A. Approaches to University Writing A (3)

Prerequisite: Placement in a supported GE subarea A2 Written Communication course. Corequisite: UNIV 061. Expository prose writing, with a focus on both content and form. Specific emphases include the exercise of logical thought and clear expression, the development of effective organizational strategies and the appropriate gathering and utilization of evidence. Includes instruction on diction, syntax …

AFRS 113B. Approaches to University Writing B (3)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 113A. Corequisite: UNIV 062. Expository prose writing with a focus on both content and form. Specific emphases include the exercise of logical thought and clear expression, the development of effective organizational strategies and the appropriate gathering and utilization of evidence. Includes instruction on diction, syntax and grammar, as well as the elements …

AFRS 114A. Approaches to University Writing A (3)

Prerequisite: Placement in a supported GE subarea A2 Written Communication course. Expository prose writing, with a focus on both content and form. Specific emphases include the exercise of logical thought and clear expression, the development of effective organizational strategies and the appropriate gathering and utilization of evidence. Includes instruction on diction, syntax and grammar, as well …

AFRS 114B. Approaches to University Writing B (3)

Prerequisite: 114A. Expository prose writing, with a focus on both content and form. Specific emphases include the exercise of logical thought and clear expression, the development of effective organizational strategies and the appropriate gathering and utilization of evidence. Includes instruction on diction, syntax and grammar, as well as the elements of prose style. Students receive …

AFRS 115. Approaches to University Writing (3)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level writing. Expository prose writing with a focus on both content and form. Specific emphases include the exercise of logical thought and clear expression, the development of effective organizational strategies and the appropriate gathering and utilization of evidence. Includes instruction on diction, syntax and grammar, as well as the elements …

AFRS 151. Freshman Speech Communication (3)

Prerequisite: Multiple Measures Placement in GE-level writing, or completion of 113A or 114A, or completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the study of the human communication process, with emphasis on techniques of contemporary African-American rhetoric. Includes intensive practice in public speaking, logical reasoning and critical listening. (Cross-listed with AAS 151, CAS 151, CHS …

AFRS 161. American Political Institutions: A Black Perspective (3)

Examines the development and dynamics of American political institutions and political processes as they relate to the experiences of African-Americans. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, D3/D4 Constitution of the United States/State and Local Government.) (ES)

AFRS 165. Introduction to Pan Africanism (3)

Strongly recommended for all AFRS majors and minors. Examines the origin and growth of the Pan African movement from the 19th century to the present time. Critical evaluation of major Pan African ideologists and practitioners. Successes and failures of the Organization of African Unity from 1963 to the present time. (Available for General Education, F …

AFRS 168. Introduction to the African Diaspora (3)*

Students will explore a variety of historical, theoretical, and cultural approaches to studying the African Diaspora. The assigned readings cover both the geographic and conceptual nature of the African Diaspora beginning on the African continent, moving through the Americas (North, South, and the Caribbean basin), and into Europe. It considers important issues in the construction …

AFRS 171. Classical African Civilization (3)*

Surveys the various great societies of Africa, covering a period from the origin of humankind in East Africa to the great Zulu Kingdom led by Chaka in the 19th century. In addition to describing the leadership, histories and achievements of African figures like Imhotep, Zoser, Ahknaten, Muhammed and Chaka, attention is given to understanding the …

AFRS 201. Economics of the African-American Community I (3)

Introduction to the operations of the U.S. economy, with special emphasis on the interrelationships between producers, consumers and governmental components. Emphasizes the economic position and economic needs of the African-American community within this system. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.) (ES)

AFRS 204. Race and Critical Thinking (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the basic concepts of deductive logic as a dimension of critical reasoning and the practical usage of those concepts in discussing, analyzing and critiquing ideas on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and other relevant issues of modern society. (Available for …

AFRS 220. Psychological Environment of the African-American (3)

Study of contemporary American society and its effects on the African-American community from the perspective of basic psychological concepts and theories. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.) (ES)

AFRS 221. Social Environment of the African-American (3)

Study of contemporary American society and its effects on the African-American community from the perspective of basic sociological concepts and theories. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.) (ES)

AFRS 226. Traditional African Cultures (3)

Comprehensive overview of the African societies and cultures from the earliest times to the 20th century. Case studies in ethnology, kinship and marriage, economic and political institutions, religion and philosophy, the arts and the interaction between the traditional African cultures and the non-African cultures. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

AFRS 245. African-American Literature Since 1930 (3)

Introduction to major African-American authors from 1930 to the present. The work of Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, John Killens, James Baldwin and LeRoi Jones are studied, as well as the works of writers who formed the Black Arts Movement that flourished during the 1970s. Focus on understanding the dynamics of African-American …

AFRS 246. Introduction to African-American Drama (3)

Chronological survey of the major works of representative African-American dramatists from 1925 to the present, with particular focus on their techniques, ideas and the cultural milieu in which the works were produced. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.) (ES)

AFRS 252. Popular Culture and the Black World (3)

This course examines popular culture as it relates to the cultural transmission, inheritance, and complex relations between African origins and the irreversible scatterings of the Black diaspora. Specifically, we will examine the role of media and the arts in enabling, facilitating, or challenging the social constructions of “Blackness” in Black popular culture. The course will …

AFRS 271. African-American History to 1865 (3)

Survey course examining the themes and issues in the history of the African peoples in America up to 1865. (Available for General Education, C3 American History, Institutions and Ideals.)

AFRS 272. African-American History Since 1865 (3)

Survey in African-American history covering the period 1865 to the present. Includes the Reconstruction era, post-Reconstruction, the Negro Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and black nationalism. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, C3 American History, Institutions and Ideals.) (ES)

AFRS 274. History of Caribbean Societies Since the 1830s (3)

Historical approach to an analysis of the political, social and economic development of the Caribbean islands after the 1830s. General focus centered on post-emancipation colonialism and the development of a particular form of neo-colonialism that manifested itself after independence. Also includes an examination of the emergence of contemporary radical political movements.

AFRS 280. Workshop in Creative Writing for Minority Students (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introductory workshop in minority creative writing. Students learn to write in the three genres–prose fiction, drama and/or poetry. In addition, students have the opportunity to meet and work with distinguished professional minority writers. Students should consult with the instructor about the semester syllabus and Minority Literature Concentration. …

AFRS 300. Contemporary Issues in the African-American Community (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In-depth exploration of the social, political, cultural, and economic issues in the African-American community. Provides insight on the extent to which these issues affect the black individual and family in their interaction with the majority American society. Available for Section B of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential …

AFRS 301. Economics of the African-American Community II (3)

Study of the household as a consuming unit and the firm as a producing unit, exploring factor costs, price determinatives and income distribution, with emphasis on the African-American community and its lack of control over the means of production.

AFRS 311. Black Psychology (3)

Examination of the major theories and research by black scholars addressing the development of a black psychology. Comparisons and contrasts are made with Traditional Psychology. Pan Africanist perspective is taken (i.e., African, Caribbean, etc.).

AFRS 320. African-American Personality Development (3)

Prerequisites: AFRS 220 and/or an introductory course in Psychology; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the psychological manifestations of oppression of the African-American. Emphasis on the understanding and analysis of psychological stress, the assessment of this phenomenon and discussion of the solutions for the creation of a positive self-concept in African-American people. Meets …

AFRS 322. African-American Family (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Summarizes structural evaluation and role formation of the family. Presents an overview of the traditional African family and socialization process. Focuses on the impact of slavery and post-slavery institutions on the formation of the black family in America. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, …

AFRS 324. The Black Woman in Contemporary Times (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines the social, political and psychological forces impacting the lives of black women and focuses on their expectations, opportunities, problems and goals in contemporary society. Also studies the black woman’s contribution to the family and the community. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available for General Education, F …

AFRS 325. The Black Man in Contemporary Times (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines the social, political and psychological forces affecting the lives of black men and focuses on their expectations, opportunities, problems and goals in contemporary society. Studies contributions of the black male and his relationships to the family, community and American society. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (Available …

AFRS 332. African-American Music I (3)

Historical analysis of African-American music, from its beginnings in Africa until its flowering in New Orleans.

AFRS 337. Black Images on the Silver Screen (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In-depth exploration of the history and criticism of the black image on the American screen and the social and political background from which the African-American image has developed. Emphasizes technical (how a film is composed) and critical (the meaning that can be drawn from those compositions) perspectives. …

AFRS 344. Literature of the Caribbean and African Experience (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines the literatures of people in Africa and the Caribbean. Establishes the theoretical, historical, cultural and imagistic framework within which that literature operates. Thematic analysis of the literatures with respect to both their comparative experiences and their specifically different backgrounds. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

AFRS 345. African-American Autobiography (3)

Analysis of the thematic patterns in autobiographies from the slave narrative through the present, focusing on the continuity of the African-American experiences from a psychological, sociological and historical point of view.

AFRS 346. Contemporary Black Female Writers (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of selected works by contemporary Black women writers, including Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange and Maya Angelou. Themes explored include correcting the images, movement from masking to self-revelation, male-female relationships and search for wholeness. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

AFRS 350. Advanced Writing (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Advanced course emphasizing alternative strategies in expository writing skills development. Focus on such purposeful forms of discourse as reports, the research paper, critiques, the essay examination and selected forms of correspondence. Cursory review of grammar, mechanics and syntax is offered as needed. More intensive review of such …

AFRS 361. African-American Politics (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the politics of the African-American, including political socialization, voting, interest groups, political parties and the political behavior within the sub-cultural context. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

AFRS 366. Colonialism in Africa (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Comprehensive overview of the motives of the European colonizers of Africa and the methods they used in their colonial pursuits. Consequences of the colonization of Africa and the slave trade. African liberation movements. Case studies of colonialism in specific regions and/or specific countries. Meets the Ethnic Studies …

AFRS 367. African American Social Movements (3)*

This course is an examination of the theory and practice of African-American social movements designed to introduce students to the various approaches and models used to study social movements and apply them to the African American experience. Theories that promulgate non-violent direct action, the use of violence and other non-systemic activity will be assessed within …

AFRS 368. Politics of Hip Hop (3)

Examination of African-American youth and society through the medium of Hip Hop. This course also explores the connection between the Hip Hop community and the various political, corporate and institutional actors that influence society both locally and globally. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of Hip Hop on African identity, culture and politics. Required …

AFRS 392A-Z. Fieldwork in the African-American Community (3)

Gives students a working knowledge of the African-American community, including its culture, problems and current efforts to solve problems in the community.

AFRS 395. Bilingualism in the African-American Community (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explores the genesis of African-American linguistic patterns, with a focus on acquisition of Ebonics as a sociocultural linguistic phenomenon. Available for Section C of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential Candidates.

AFRS 398. Research Methods and Paradigms in Pan African Studies (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division Standing. Introduction to paradigms, theories, and models of research on the Africana community. Emphasis will be placed on methodological, epistemological and ethical concerns related to conducting research studies on people of African descent. Other topics include sampling techniques, experimental and non-experimental designs, ethnography, and archival approaches relevant to the Africana community.

AFRS 417. Equity and Diversity in Schools (3)*

Prepares teacher candidates to examine principles of educational equity, diversity and the implementation of curriculum content and school practices for elementary/secondary students. Focuses on the history and culture of a specific ethnic experience and a comparative analysis made with other ethnic groups in California. Engages students to examine, critique and reflect on their personal biases …

AFRS 420. The Black Child (3)*

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Exploration of African-American childhood socialization dynamics through an examination of the forces of constraint and development. Examines theories of social development and achievement. Available for Section A of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential Candidates. Meets the Ethnic Studies requirement. (ES) *Not available for General Education credit.

AFRS 451. Mass Communication in the African-American Community (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in AFRS 151 or instructor consent. Historical analysis of the role played by the mass media in the African-American community from slavery to contemporary times. Particular attention given to evaluating the African-American press.

AFRS 466B. Model Organization of African Unity Practicum (3-3)

In-depth preparation of the delegation on the specific issues on an African nation to be dealt with at the OAU Conference in Washington, D.C. Seminar with group discussions, presentations and country resolutions.

AFRS 498. Proseminar in Pan African Studies (3)

Primarily restricted to students majoring in Africana Studies, but open to other students with instructor consent. Capstone course for the AFRS major, usually taken during the final semester before baccalaureate graduation. Focuses on a synthesis of the information, concepts, material and methodologies provided in previous AFRS classes. Provides intensive practice in utilizing that data in theoretical analysis …

AFRS 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3)

Course content to be determined.

ANTH 108. Latin American Cultures (3)

Study of major social institutions and lifestyles in Central and South America focusing on contemporary peoples, their traditional cultural base and current cultural changes. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

ANTH 150. The Human Adventure: Introduction to Anthropology (3)

Overview of human physical and cultural origins and the development and distribution of diverse populations, languages, social institutions and beliefs; introduction to the methods and insights of cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and physical anthropology. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

ANTH 151. Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)

Anthropological perspective on biological variation in human and non-human primates in the past and the present; examines the interaction between biology and culture in the evolution of human society. Evolution and behavior of non-human primates are examined for what they reveal about the human condition. (Available for General Education, B2 Life Science or D1 Social …

ANTH 152. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

Study of the variety of cultural patterns that human societies use to adapt to the environment, guide social interaction and understand the human condition. Emphasizes the ideas and methods anthropologists use to develop a scientific and humanistic understanding of the world’s cultures. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

ANTH 153. Temples, Tombs and Treasures? An Introduction to Archaeology (3)

Although we are often captivated by the ancient past, many of the reconstructions of this past found in popular culture are not based on the premises of scientific archaeological practice. This course introduces students to the methods, theories and results of scientific archaeological study. Students learn how archaeologists collect and analyze data in order to …

ANTH 212. Anthropology of Sex (3)

This course will examine human sexuality from a holistic anthropological perspective. Subjects such as sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual intercourse, prostitution, sexual coercion, homosexuality and masturbation will be examined from a biological perspective looking to the non-human primates for comparison, and a cultural perspective using ethnographic and archeological data. Additionally, the course will examine the …

ANTH 222. Visions of the Sacred (3)

Study of the varieties of religious beliefs, rituals and experiences showing the relationship between people and their society, culture, environment and universe. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

ANTH 232. Expressive Culture (3)

This course presents an introduction to the anthropological analysis of expressive culture. Each course offering will focus on a specific form of expressive culture, such as clothing, food, music, or visual art. Students explore the history of the cultural form; consider how it reflects and communicates societal structures and cultural meanings and values; and examine …

ANTH 250. Archaeology of Warfare (3)

Examines the issue of conflict in human societies through archaeological evidence. Topics include anthropological perspectives on violence and the human condition; associations between warfare and the rise of the state in the ancient world; the role of war in ancient empires; and the archaeology of war in historic contexts. (Available for General Education, D1 Social …

ANTH 262. Forensic Anthropology (3)

This course introduces forensic anthropology, the study of human skeletal remains in the context of criminal investigations, war crimes, mass fatalities, and unexplained deaths, among other contexts. Students will learn how forensic anthropologists combine traditional and cutting-edge techniques in the field and laboratory to investigate crimes, provide scientific evidence for prosecution, and resolve complex mass …

ANTH 302. Introduction to Applied Anthropology (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division GE course in cultural anthropology, sociology, political science or cultural geography; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This practical, hands-on course introduces students to the ways in which anthropologists apply our field’s skills, knowledge, and perspectives towards the resolution of social problems in today’s world. Students are introduced to a variety of …

ANTH 303. Anthropological Thought (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152. Study of the conceptual foundations of contemporary anthropological thought. Topics include evolutionary theory, functionalism, historicalism, structuralism and interpretative anthropology.

ANTH 305. Individual and Culture (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or PSY 150 or SOC 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Not to be taken for credit in addition to SOC 305. Comparative study of the relationship between the individuals and their culture. Child-rearing in nonwestern cultures. Exploration of individual identity and group character. Regular written assignments required. (Available for General …

ANTH 306. Anthropology of Native North America (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152. North American Indians in prehistoric, historic and present time.

ANTH 307. Anthropology of Native California and the Southwest (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152. American Indians in what is now California and the Southwest from the earliest times until today.

ANTH 308. Gender and Culture (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Discussion of gender in Western and non-Western, modernizing, industrializing, and globalizing societies; gender and the impact of cultural change. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

ANTH 310. Language in Culture: Anthropological Linguistics (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of basic linguistic concepts in cultural contexts; an examination of language diversity and sociocultural factors of language use. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

ANTH 311. Human Variation (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 151. Morphological, genetic and physiological aspects of human biological variability; the concept and description of race; the interaction of cultural and environmental factors in human biological adaptation.

ANTH 315. World Cultures and Societies (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Compares and contrasts the world’s diverse cultures and societies and examines their current and ever changing relationships in anthropological perspective. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

ANTH 319. World Prehistory (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Encompasses the origin and development of prehistoric human culture from hunting and gathering to the origin of urban societies. Surveys the archaeological evidence from both the New and Old World. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

ANTH 326. Introduction to Folklore (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the study of folklore from a cross-cultural perspective, including major forms such as folktale, legend, ballad, joke, riddle, proverb and festival, and the theories used to interpret them. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

ANTH 338. Anthropology of Africa (3)

Issues in and perspectives on culture in Africa, including views of Africa’s diversity, complexity, and relationship to colonialism and contemporary globalization.

ANTH 341. Bones: An Introduction to the Study of Human Remains (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or ANTH 151 or ANTH 262 or BIOL 100 or BIOL 101 or BIOL 106; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Forensic Anthropology has been popularized in recent years by a range of popular media. But what can human remains really tell us? In this class, we will review the methods …

ANTH 345. Anthropology of the Contemporary United States (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of individual and group identity, including the interaction of diverse subcultures in the United States. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

ANTH 351. Anthropology of Middle America (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152 or CAS 100. Issues in and perspectives on cultures from Mexico to Panama, including the Caribbean.

ANTH 352. Anthropology of South America (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152. Survey of the cultures and societies of South America from late prehistory until the present, addressing cultural history and change, social organization, as well as artistic and intellectual achievements.

ANTH 353. The Maya: Ancient and Modern (3)

The Maya form one of the largest indigenous linguistic groups in the Americas. This course is an introductory survey of their culture and society from prehistoric times to the present. The course addresses the cultural history, social organization and political history of the Maya, as well as their artistic and intellectual achievements. Discussions include examination …

ANTH 356. Anthropology of the Mediterranean (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152. Issues in and perspectives on culture in the Mediterranean region, including Spain, southern France, Italy, Greece, the Middle East and North Africa.

ANTH 360. Immigration and Ethnicity (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines the basic concepts that inform our understanding of immigration and ethnicity: race, class, gender; the politics of multiculturalism and cultural diversity; and the conflicts and problems inherent in the immigrant experience.

ANTH 421. Primatology: Morphology, Behavior and Social Organization (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 151; ANTH 150 or ANTH 152. Detailed examination of that part of physical anthropology which seeks to add to understanding of human behavior and evolution by elucidating the social organizations and behavioral adaptation of the primates. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 423. Human Behavior: Evolutionary Perspectives (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 151; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the various methods and approaches anthropologists use to understand human behavior from a biocultural perspective. Examines the determinants of human behavior, past and present. Regular written assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 424. The Supernatural in the Modern World (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 152. Ethnographic examination of supernatural belief and experience in contemporary societies. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 425. Culture, Health and Healing (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 151 or ANTH 152. Introduction to medical anthropology, the study of the interaction of biological, psychological and sociocultural factors in human promotion of health and adaptation to disease. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 426. Old World Archaeology (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 153. Survey of the culture history of the Old World from Paleolithic times to the rise of the major Old World civilizations, with an emphasis on the prehistory of the Southwestern Asian, Mediterranean and European regions. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 427. Archaeology of North America (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 153; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of the origins and adaptations of Native American Cultures. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 428. Archaeology of Mesoamerica (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 153; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Overview of the cultural achievements and developments in Mesoamerica prior to the Spanish Conquest. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 429. Archaeology of South America (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 153; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Overview of the cultural achievements and developments in South America prior to the colonialization by the European countries. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 430. Environmental Anthropology (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Anthropological approaches to understanding the human-environment relationship. Explores how populations interact with ecological opportunities and constraints, change in the human-environment relationship over time, and causes and consequences of unsustainability. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 432. Environmental Justice and Health (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Students in this course will explore issues of global development and social justice, particularly looking at the issues of environmental degradation and human health in the context of global and local inequality. Students will explore such topics as agricultural and natural resource development, the effects …

ANTH 440. Bioarchaeology (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 262 or ANTH 341 or ANTH 445/L. Bioarchaeology focuses on the study of human skeletal remains in archaeological context. It is a specialization in anthropology that incorporates methods and concepts from both biological anthropology and archaeology. Shaped and changed by biology and culture, human skeletons can help us understand how people lived, organized …

ANTH 445/L. Human Osteology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: ANTH 341; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: ANTH 445L. Human Osteology is the study of the human skeleton. In this class, students will learn to recognize all of the human skeletal elements and appreciate the range of skeletal variation in individuals and populations. Osteological methods used on human remains discovered in an …

ANTH 449. Historical Archaeology (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 153; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course discusses the concepts, strategies, and applications of historical archaeology as practiced in the United States. Associated topics include integrating documentary and archaeological histories, culture contact, identity, ethnogenesis, class and labor, conflict, modern material culture studies, historic preservation, and historical archaeology in the context …

ANTH 450. Historical Anthropology (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the anthropological study of cultures within a historical context. Examines the importance of a diachronic approach to the study of contemporary societies and introduces anthropological methods for a study of the past. Teaches critical analysis of documentary materials relevant for …

ANTH 451. Economic Anthropology (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 152, plus one regional area course. Comparative study of the economic component of human cultures. Emphasizes the problems of theoretical conceptualization. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 453. Human Paleontology (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 151, ANTH 153. Origin of humanity and the history of physical evolution beginning in Miocene times and continuing through to the present. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 460. Gender Archaeology (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 152 or ANTH 153; Upper division standing; completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines the data and theories that provide insights into gender in prehistoric societies. Discussion of fundamental issues such as the origins of the gendered division of labor, the origins of gender hierarchy, the universality of female subordination and variability in …

ANTH 462. Anthropology of the Arts (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150, ANTH 152 or ANTH 153; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Anthropological approaches to the study of artistic expression in diverse sociocultural settings from the prehistoric to the present. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 465. Museum Anthropology: Principles and Practices (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 152 or equivalent. This course introduces students to the theoretical and technical aspects of museum work as it relates to ethnographic and archaeological materials, as well as to the political and ethical ramifications of these practices. The course explores museum practices, skills and resources as they relate to the collection, curation, exhibition and …

ANTH 468. Cultural Heritage (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 152 and ANTH 153; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to cultural heritage studies that focuses on the politics of the representation and conservation of tangible and intangible remains of the past. An examination of the issues at stake in the interpretation, management, and portrayal of the past that contribute to the …

ANTH 473. Theory and Method in Archaeology (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 153. Recommended Preparatory: ANTH 303. This course provides students with the basic theoretical and methodological skills and background needed to become practicing archaeologists. By the end of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate archaeological arguments on a range of key topics in terms of their theoretical approach, research design …

ANTH 475. Ethnographic Research Methods (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 150 or ANTH 152; Upper division standing; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to the integration of anthropological perspectives with other social scientific research, including quantitative and advanced qualitative methods. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 476A-Z. Topics in Anthropological Methods (3)

Fieldwork in any branch of anthropology, taken either in conjunction with or subsequent to an upper division course in that particular branch. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 486. Interrogating Globalization: The Ethnography of Global Problems (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 152 or equivalent. Preparatory: ANTH 300 or ANTH 315 or completion of regional distribution requirement. This course studies globalization using ethnography. It examines both the debates related to characterizing globalization and ethnographies that analyze some of its aspects, such as the rise of high-tech societies, the decentralization and feminization of labor, the dynamics …

ANTH 490A-E. Seminar in Anthropology (3-3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 303; ANTH 473 or ANTH 474 or ANTH 475 or ANTH 519 or ANTH 574 or ANTH 575. Recommended Preparatory: One upper division course in the appropriate Anthropology sub-discipline. Faculty-directed research on primary data in the major sub-disciplines of Anthropology. Selected subjects in the same sub-discipline may be repeated up to two times. …

ANTH 494AA-ZZ. Anthropological Field Studies (8)

Recommended Preparatory: ANTH 153 or equivalent. Enrolled students will participate as working field associates on anthropological field projects. Students will practice field methodologies appropriate to the different subdisciplines of anthropology. Participation requires that students live full time at the field site. Students must be at least 18 years of age to participate. Field fee required. …

ANTH 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Anthropology (3)

Prerequisite: Appropriate introductory course. Selected topics in Anthropology with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study. Available for graduate credit.

ANTH 500. Foundations of Anthropological Theory and Method (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Required for post-baccalaureate certificate and master’s students in Anthropology, and recommended for advanced undergraduate students who have not majored in anthropology yet are considering pursuing a master’s degree in that field. This course provides students with an accelerated overview of past and current anthropological theories explaining human physical and …

ANTH 518/L. Lab Methods in Archaeology (2/1)

Prerequisite: ANTH 473. Corequisite: ANTH 518L. Participation in description, analysis and interpretation of archaeological collections. Classification, measurement and description, cataloging and recording of pottery, lithic and other materials are discussed. 2 hours lecture; one 2-hour lab per week.

ANTH 521. California Archaeology (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 473. Study of the archaeology of California from the earliest times through the Mission Period, with particular attention to the ecology of foraging and the causes of the cultural changes exhibited in the sequence.

ANTH 527. Advanced North American Archaeology (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Archaeological research in North America has produced evidence for more than 15,000 years of human occupation. This advanced course details this history and the material evidence through which it is studied, with a particular emphasis on new discoveries and controversies.

ANTH 549. Advanced Historical Archaeology (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. This course presents advanced concepts, strategies, and applications of historical archaeology as practiced in the United States. Associated topics include integrating documentary and archaeological histories, culture contact, identity, ethnogenesis, class and labor, conflict, modern material culture studies, historic preservation, and historical archaeology in the context of cultural resource management …

ANTH 574. Advanced Quantitative Methods in Anthropology (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. This course covers the descriptive and inferential statistics used in anthropological research and reporting. Students gain experience incorporating quantitative applications in research, along with the knowledge of how to effectively discuss, analyze, display and present data.

ANTH 575. Advanced Ethnographic Research Methods (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. This course familiarizes the student to advanced methods in social science research from an anthropological perspective. Students will learn the process of research design, standards of ethical conduct when working with human subjects, quantitative and qualitative data collection methods, and the basics of data analysis and interpretation.

ANTH 590A. Research Seminar in Anthropology: Archaeology (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Research seminar on current topics in Archaeology. May be repeated up to three times when seminar topics differ.

ANTH 590B. Research Seminar in Anthropology: Biological Anthropology (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Research seminars on current topics in Biological Anthropology. May be repeated up to three times when seminar topics differ.

ANTH 590C. Research Seminar in Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Research seminar on current topics in Cultural Anthropology. May be repeated up to three times when seminar topics differ.

ANTH 590E. Research Seminar in Anthropology: Applied Anthropology (3-3-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Research seminar on current topics in Applied Anthropology. May be repeated up to three times when seminar topics differ.

ANTH 601. Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3)

Prerequisite: Classified status or instructor consent. Survey of the development of anthropological theory across the subdisciplines of anthropology.

ANTH 602. Problems in Cultural Anthropology (3)

Prerequisite: Classified status or instructor consent. Survey of current issues and debates in cultural anthropology.

ANTH 603. Problems in Biological Anthropology (3)

Prerequisite: Classified status or instructor consent. Advanced study of theories, methods, problems and data pertinent to contemporary biological anthropology.

ANTH 606. Problems in Archaeology (3)

Prerequisite: Classified status or instructor consent. Intensive review of current issues and concepts critical to general understanding of archaeology.

ANTH 607. Seminar in Management of Archaeological Resources (3)

Prerequisite: Classified status or instructor consent. Covers the practical, scientific and ethical aspects of conducting archaeological research for public and private agencies.

ANTH 608. Problems in Applied Anthropology (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status. Survey of current issues and debates in applied anthropology.

ANTH 693. Teaching Anthropology (3)

This course introduces graduate students to the methods and practices used in teaching Anthropology. It prepares students to teach in community colleges, and serve as teaching assistants in Ph.D. programs in Anthropology. Students will learn to create measurable student learning outcomes, develop instructional strategies and methods for various learning contexts (including online classes), develop lesson …

ANTH 694. Practicum in Cultural Resource Management (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 607 or instructor consent. Internship involving the student directly in a work experience in cultural resource management. (Credit/No Credit only)

ANTH 696A. Anthropological Research Design (2)

Prerequisite: Classified status. This seminar will focus on how anthropological research is conceived and planned, with consideration of differing theoretical viewpoints and their usefulness. Students will discuss the unique position of anthropology among the sciences and humanities and resulting issues for research design. Students will review typical anthropological research problems, discuss appropriate methods and critique …

ANTH 696B. Proposal and Grant-Writing (2)

Prerequisites: Classified status; Successful completion of 696A. This seminar instructs students on developing and implementing research design, preparing them to write research and grant proposals. Students will analyze successful research and grant proposals, study how research is conceptualized within each genre and subfield and practice writing effective proposals. Topics addressed include identifying researchable questions, the …

ANTH 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (2)

Prerequisite: Completion of all courses required in the program. Intended for students taking the comprehensive exam. (Credit/No Credit only)

ANTH 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: ANTH 696A and ANTH 696B; 3.5 GPA. Thesis or graduate project.

ANTH 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status.

CJS 102. Introduction to Criminology and Justice Studies (3)

Introduction to Criminology and Justice Studies provides an overview of the fields of criminology and criminal justice, the relationship between the two fields, and how both influence each other. Both traditional and contemporary approaches to justice will be explored, including alternatives and system reform. Furthermore, students will critically examine the purpose, components, and processes of …

CJS 280. Statistics in Criminology and Justice Studies (3)

Prerequisite: Criminology and Justice Studies major. This course is designed to introduce students to descriptive and inferential statistics used in criminology and justice studies. Specifically, students will learn the essentials of probability, estimation, and confidence intervals using data, examples, and situations relevant to the fields of criminology and criminal justice. Students will also learn methods …

CJS 302. Crime, Criminal Justice and Society (3)

This course provides an introduction to key perspectives, principles, institutions, actors, and issues in the field of criminology and criminal justice. This course takes a critical perspective on current issues and controversies surrounding the attempts to understand the causes of crime as well as the criminal justice response to it. The impact of crime and …

CJS 310. Juvenile Justice (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course provides an analysis of the historical and philosophical foundations of the juvenile justice process and system. Special attention is given to legal and administrative issues, reforms, and controversies. Additionally, the course will include the study of the emergence of youth subcultures …

CJS 320. Introduction to Criminal Law and Legal Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course creates a foundation in criminal law and legal procedure as applied to the criminal justice field. Rationales for punishing criminals, elements of crimes and defense of the accused are covered. In addition, this course examines tensions between various state statutes, the …

CJS 326. Victimology (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102 or CJS 302. This course introduces the field of victimology including the extent, types, theories, and effects of crime victimization and trauma at multiple levels of the social ecology. This course explores the influence of identities such as race, ethnicity, indigeneity, class, religious affiliation, disability, sexuality/sexual orientation, immigration status, gender/gender identity, and …

CJS 328. Diversity and Crime (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102 or CJS 302. This course explores human diversity, including but not limited to race, indigeneity, class, gender/gender identity, dis/ability, mental illness, sexuality/sexual orientation, immigration status, and their intersections in connection to crime perpetration, victimization, and the criminal justice system. Students enrolled in this course will explore disproportionate contacts with the criminal justice …

CJS 334. Law Enforcement and Security (3)

This course provides a foundation for the understanding of U.S. law enforcement and security including its historical origins as a colonial institution of social control. Students will explore police culture, the organization and operations of law enforcement, contemporary issues in law enforcement, and major and emerging theoretical traditions in the field of law enforcement and …

CJS 340. Ethics in Criminal Justice (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course provides a foundation for the study and application of ethics in criminal justice decision making and policy analysis.  Students will demonstrate the ability to apply ethical practice in research and applied situations through writing. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

CJS 344. Corrections (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. Offers social-scientific examination of the field of corrections, both substantively and critically. Includes patterns and trends in incarceration rates; police and judicial processes resulting in incarceration; climate and culture of correctional facilities; and gender/diversity issues in corrections. Discussion of correctional facilities and supervision including …

CJS 350. Criminological Theory (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course provides a foundational understanding of criminological theory, including its historical development and application to contemporary issues in crime and justice. Students will explore the diverse theoretical traditions underpinning the field, including established and emerging biosocial, control, learning, strain, conflict, life …

CJS 360. Career Planning in Criminal Justice (3)

The course provides the groundwork for professional socialization into the roles, norms, expectations and requirements for careers in the criminal justice system. Special attention will be given to the ways in which local agencies interview, hire and train new criminal justice employees and how internships feed into those professional expectations by these agencies. Students are …

CJS 370. Criminal Justice Systems (3)

This course provides a foundational understanding of the development, organization, and process of the police, law and the courts, and corrections from a systemic perspective and their interactions with other social institutions. Course content addresses the historical origins, development, purpose, and goals of the U.S. criminal justice system from colonial institutions of social control to …

CJS 380/L. Criminology and Justice Methods and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: CJS 102 or CJS 302. Preparatory: CJS 280. Note: CJS 380 and 380L are corequisite classes. CJS 380/L is designed to give students a working knowledge of basic research methods and data used in the study of criminology and criminal justice. The seminar portion of the course is designed to highlight the research process, …

CJS 402. Gangs (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course provides a core foundation for the study of gangs and gang control in a historical and contemporary perspective. Gang definitions, types, social organization, and control are included in this class as well as an examination of the social, political, and economic conditions …

CJS 418. Gender and Crime (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. The course examines the historical and contemporary views of gender/gender identity and criminality, victimization, crime perpetration, and societal responses to crime and public policy. In addition, this course examines the scientific study of gender/gender identity and crime by examining intersectional social factors such  as …

CJS 422. White Collar Crime (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course will explore various types of white collar crime committed in the United States and abroad, including fraud, perjury, obstruction, computer crime, identity theft, bribery and corruption, embezzlement, tax evasion, conspiracy, RICO, and organizational (entity) crime. It will examine criminal procedure, including search …

CJS 432. Alcohol, Drugs, and Crime (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course will provide a foundation for understanding the interactions between alcohol, drugs, and crime. Included in this foundation are the nature, effects, theories, interventions, and prevention of substance abuse both for individuals and society. Students will engage in a critical examination of the …

CJS 438. Gender and Criminal Justice (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course will explore the values, ethics, and ideologies underlying the current justice system and social justice responses, with special application given to the role of sex, gender, gender expression, and gender identity. The course will explore gender and justice beyond the …

CJS 444. Community Corrections (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course studies the role of community corrections within the U.S. correctional system. Specifically, this course includes topics including pretrial diversion, community-based sentences and treatment, and parole supervision. Critical issues in the field including offender reentry, managing offenders in a community setting, and instituting …

CJS 446. Domestic Violence (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. This course explores the various forms of domestic violence including the prevalence across different social dimensions, including but not limited to gender/gender identity, race, indigeneity, ethnicity, class, immigration status, sexuality/sexual orientation, and their intersections. Domestic violence will be discussed from various theoretical perspectives to …

CJS 448. Global Perspectives in Crime and Justice (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. The purpose of this course is to give students an introduction to criminology and criminal justice from a global perspective. Students in this course adopt comparative and cross-national approaches to crime in order to examine a number of subject matters in international criminal law, …

CJS 452AA-ZZ. Selected Topics in Criminology (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. Special seminars in selected topics in criminology offered based on student interest and faculty expertise. Examples of topics include in-depth study of such specialty areas as terrorism, sexual victimization, cybercrime, or profiling. Available for graduate credit.

CJS 454AA-ZZ. Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302 or permission of instructor. Special seminars in selected topics in criminal justice offered based on students interest and faculty expertise. Topics involve in-depth study of such specialty areas of criminal justice as restorative justice, terrorism and criminal justice, deadly force, or police discretion. Available for graduate credit.

CJS 480. Applied Research in Criminology and Justice Studies (3)

Prerequisites: SOC 250 or CJS 102 or CJS 302; CJS 430/L or GEOG 306/L; or permission of instructor. This course will provide students applied research experience either in a criminal justice-related agency or with crime data. The course will focus on the practice of research in the field of criminology and justice studies, the development …

CJS 494A-E/AA-EE. Criminal Justice Internships Seminar and Field Experience (1/2)

Prerequisites: CJS 102 or CJS 302; CJS 430/L; senior standing; permission of instructor. CJS 494A-E and CJS 494AA-EE are corequisite classes for an internship experience relating to one of these five areas: law enforcement (494A and 494AA), law and courts (494B and 494BB), corrections (494C and 494CC), victim services (494D and 494DD), and community based …

GEOG 101. The Physical Environment (3)

Study of the natural environment–nature, distribution and relationships of climate, landforms, vegetation, hydrology and soils. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science.) Note: Students should only enroll in GEOG 101 if meeting the B3 Science Laboratory Activity in Life Science.

GEOG 101A. The Physical Environment (2)

Corequisite: GEOG 101AL. Examines the natural environment including the distribution of and relationships between weather, climate, landforms, vegetation, hydrology, and soils. Students will learn critical skills to understand the processes shaping the physical world and gain an understanding of environmental and landscape change over time. Students may not receive credit for both GEOG 101A and …

GEOG 101AL. The Physical Environment Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOG 101A. Examines the natural environment including the distribution of and relationships between weather, climate, landforms, vegetation, hydrology, and soils. Students will learn critical skills to understand the processes shaping the physical world and gain an understanding of environmental and landscape change over time. 2 hours lab. Students may not receive credit for both …

GEOG 102. Physical Geography Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOG 101. Observations, experiments and demonstrations designed to familiarize students with techniques utilized by physical geographers. 2 hours lab. Note: Students should enroll in GEOG 101A/AL instead of GEOG 101/102.

GEOG 103. Weather (3)

Study of atmospheric processes. (Available for General Education, B1 Physical Science.) Note: Students should only enroll in GEOG 103 if meeting the B3 Science Laboratory Activity in Life Science.

GEOG 103A. Weather (2)

Corequisite: GEOG 103AL. Explores the fundamental concepts of the dynamics of Earth’s atmosphere, its composition, and the processes and patterns of weather. The topics covered in this course include an examination of how Earth’s atmosphere is warmed and cooled, daily and seasonal temperature variations, the development and type of clouds, moisture (rain, snow, humidity, dew, …

GEOG 103AL. Weather Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOG 103A. Explores the fundamental concepts of the dynamics of Earth’s atmosphere, its composition, and the processes and patterns of weather. The topics covered in this course include an examination of how Earth’s atmosphere is warmed and cooled, daily and seasonal temperature variations, the development and type of clouds, moisture (rain, snow, humidity, dew, …

GEOG 105. Weather Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOG 103. Observations, experiments and demonstrations designed to familiarize students with the nature of California’s weather and climate. 2 hours lab per week.

GEOG 106LRS. The Physical Environment for Liberal Studies Majors (3)

Study of the natural environment—nature, distribution and relationships of climate, landforms, vegetation, soils, water bodies and the solar system. (Available for Earth Science credit for Liberal Studies majors.) (Cross-listed with GEOL 106LRS.)

GEOG 107. People, Places, and Landscapes (3)

Examines the patterns and processes of human occupance of the Earth, with a focus on the U.S. Topics such as population, agriculture, language, religion, ethnicity, politics and economics are covered using the tools, methods and perspective of the geographer. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

GEOG 111. Understanding Climate Change (3)

Severe global climate change will have disastrous consequences for Earth’s population. This course will develop the basic science behind the predictions for Earth’s climate, and explain why human activities, primarily the emission of greenhouse gases, is the main driver of global warming. Course topics include the causes of climate change, its impacts, projections for the …

GEOG 111L. Understanding Climate Change Lab (1)

Corequisite: GEOG 111. Laboratory exercises include climate prediction modeling, the use of proxy data, and examination of the impacts of climate change. 3 hours lab per week. Students receive credit for only one course chosen from either GEOG 111L, SUST 111L, or SCI 111L. (Available for General Education, B3 Science Laboratory Activity requirement provided GEOG 111 is …

GEOG 150. World Geography: People, Places, and Globalization (3)

Geographical survey of the world’s major regions, with emphasis on those features important to an understanding of current global concerns and problems. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

GEOG 170. Water Resources of California (3)

This course examines the nature and challenges of California’s water resources. Topics include the physical attributes of water (sources, quantity, and quality), the underlying climatic and hydrologic processes that determine the surface and subsurface distribution of water, and the physical, social, economic and management issues that occur as California’s water resources face increasing pressure from …

GEOG 206/L. Introduction to Geographical Information Science and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: GEOG 206L. Introduction to fundamental concepts of geographical information science. Course will cover technical and context knowledge for basic spatial analysis, including data gathering, analysis and display through digital methods. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be used to explore spatial questions about environmental and social issues. Lab demonstrates these principles through hands-on experience with …

GEOG 300. The Geographer’s Craft (3)

Introduction to geography as a discipline, emphasizing its approach to analysis and problem solving, resources for conducting geographic research, methods for answering geographic questions, and techniques for communicating insights.

GEOG 301. Cultural Geography (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division course in the social sciences; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the literature, traditions and theories dealing with the human-environment relationship and an analysis of the approaches used by cultural geographers to elucidate the nature of this relationship. Major themes are the cultural landscape, cultural ecology and environmental perception. …

GEOG 304/L. Map and Imagery Interpretation and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A or GEOG 150. Corequisite: GEOG 304L. Introduction to reading maps and interpreting aerial imagery. Emphasis on making simple measurements from maps and imagery, techniques of interpreting the physical and cultural landscape and elementary map-making. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

GEOG 305/L. Maps and Graphics and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: GEOG 305L. Preparatory: Lower division course in Geography or other relevant field. Design, use and preparation of maps and graphs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

GEOG 306/L. Intermediate Geographical Information Science and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 206/L or instructor consent. Corequisite: GEOG 306L. Intermediate course on theories and application of geographical information science. Course will cover fundamental concepts of database management, spatial analysis and data creation. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be used to discover spatial relationships among environmental and social phenomena. Labs will provide an introduction to spatial …

GEOG 311. The Atmosphere (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A or GEOG 103 or GEOG 103A or ASTR 152 or GEOL 100 or GEOL 110 or GEOL 122; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explanations of rain, wind, smog, etc. Basic principles of energy transfer. 3 hours lecture. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.)

GEOG 311L. The Atmosphere Lab (1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A or GEOG 103 or GEOG 103A or ASTR 152 or GEOL 100 or GEOL 110 or GEOL 122; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explanations of rain, wind, smog, etc. Basic principles of energy transfer. 2 hours lab.

GEOG 316. Environmental Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: GEOG 316L. Introduction to the principles of environmental geography with special emphasis on the connections between human activities and the physical (natural) environment. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the historical and contemporary impact of humans on the natural environment. 3 hours lecture. …

GEOG 318. Europe (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of the physical, historical, cultural, economic and political factors that have shaped the contemporary European landscapes. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

GEOG 321. United States (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division course in the social sciences; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Regional and cultural geography of the U.S. emphasizing human-environment interaction and the evolution of contemporary geographical patterns of population distribution, resource exploitation, transportation, and agricultural and industrial production. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

GEOG 322. Latin America (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Spatial and ecological survey of the environment, cultures, economies and societies of the Latin American nations. Emphasizes the changing settlement geography and pays special attention to Brazil and the Andean countries. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

GEOG 324. China (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Geographical analysis of the peoples and culture of China, emphasizing features important to an understanding of China’s cultural and regional diversity and contemporary problems. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

GEOG 326. Africa (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Geographical analysis of the peoples and cultures of Africa, emphasizing features important to an understanding of Africa’s cultural and regional diversity and contemporary problems. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

GEOG 330. California (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division course in the social sciences; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. An exploration of the diverse physical and human landscapes of California. The course examines the state’s environmental context (climate, landforms, water, vegetation, wildlife, minerals); human imprints on the natural landscape (population, agriculture, industry, urbanization); and the physical and human challenges …

GEOG 334. Geography of Oceania (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Cultural and regional geography of Oceania, including Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific nations, territories and protectorates. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

GEOG 340. Economic Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Lower division course in Geography or ECON 160 or ECON 300. Principles governing spatial organization of society. Theoretical and empirical approaches to location of urban and rural settlement and economic activities. Spatial structures, their interrelationships and changes in organization.

GEOG 351. Cities, Space, and Power (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division course in the social sciences; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Geographical analysis of past and current patterns of world urbanization. Emphasis on city origins, growth, development and current problems. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

GEOG 364/L. Geography of World Ecosystems and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A. Corequisite: GEOG 364L. Major vegetative formations of the world, their soil (edaphic) and atmospheric environments, and the role of human activity in modification, destruction and replacement of vegetative structures and environments through purposeful and inadvertent activities. Examines local vegetative types on field trips. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours field …

GEOG 365. Geomorphology (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A or GEOL 101; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Analytical and descriptive study of physical processes responsible for development and evolution of Earth’s surface features. Aspects of local geomorphology will be observed on field trips. 3 hours lecture. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.) (IC)

GEOG 365L. Geomorphology Lab (1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A or GEOL 101; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: GEOG 365. Analytical and descriptive study of physical processes responsible for development and evolution of Earth’s surface features. Aspects of local geomorphology will be observed on field trips. 2 hours field activity.

GEOG 366. Geography of Environmental Hazards (3)

Prerequisites: A lower division science course from Physical Geography, Geological Sciences, Physics, Chemistry, or Biology; completion of the lower division writing requirement. From a geographical perspective, comprehension of environmental hazards, their spatial distribution, their magnitude and frequency of occurrence and human perception of environmental hazards. Course emphasizes impact of environmental hazards on land utilization, settlement …

GEOG 366L. Geography of Environmental Hazards Lab (1)

Prerequisites: A lower division science course from Physical Geography, Geological Sciences, Physics, Chemistry, or Biology; completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: GEOG 366. Observations, experiments and demonstrations designed to familiarize students with the scientific investigation of environmental hazards. 2 hours lab.

GEOG 370. Water, Society, and the Environment (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course critically examines the complex relationships between human societies and water. A broad understanding of the coupled natural and human systems and their dependence on water will be examined. Topics include the global distribution of water, hydrological cycle, water supply and demand, water policy and law, …

GEOG 375. Environment, Economy, and Development (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. How do you explain environmental change without falsely blaming the world’s poor? Why do we feel faced with a choice between the economy and the environment? And what have communities around the world been doing to work, produce, consume, and engage in environmental stewardship in new ways …

GEOG 402/L. Physical Geography Techniques and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: GEOG 402L. Preparatory: GEOG 311 or GEOG 364 or GEOG 365. This techniques course in geomorphology, climatology and biogeography includes the principles of field surveying and mapping, water sampling, stream velocity and sediment transport measurement, basic weather station instrumentation, programming and deployment, and sampling designs for vegetation and soil analysis. The course will include …

GEOG 404A-Z. Field Studies in Geography (1-3)

Prerequisite: 6 units in Geography. Preparatory: GEOG 300. Techniques of field observation, recordings and analysis through mapping and written reports. Field studies may be repeated for credit. Available for graduate credit. Course Title GEOG 404A Los Angeles GEOG 404B Foreign GEOG 404E Environmental GEOG 404J Cultural GEOG 404T Urban GEOG 404Z Selected Topics

GEOG 406/L. Advanced Geographical Information Science and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 306 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 406L. This course will cover advanced topics in geographical information science. Students will investigate geographic data structures, advanced concepts in database design, algorithms for spatial data analysis, web-based mapping applications, customized applications, and implementation and management issues associated with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lab will demonstrate …

GEOG 407/L. Remote Sensing and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 304/L or GEOG 305/ L or GEOG 306/L or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 407L. Theory and practice of remote sensing by satellites and aircraft in visible, infrared and microwave portions of the spectrum. Problem-oriented course emphasizing the application of image processing software and techniques to digital satellite imagery. Available for graduate credit. …

GEOG 408A/L. Human/Cultural Applications in GIS and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 306/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408AL. Advanced applications of geographical information systems. Includes analysis of crime patterns, patterns of disease and healthcare delivery, population and housing characteristics, voting behavior and redistricting, market area analysis, utility management, transportation. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.

GEOG 408B/L. Environmental/Physical Applications in GIS and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 306/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408BL. Advanced applications of geographical information systems. Includes analysis of environmental hazards, animal and plant species distributions, distributions of archaeological sites, mineral exploration, forest inventory and management, navigation, hydrology, climatology, geomorphology. Project may result in the development of customized applications of software. Available for graduate credit. …

GEOG 408C/L. Geospatial Project Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 206/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408CL. This course exposes students to ideas and concepts in geospatial project management by covering concepts in system organization, design and analysis, as well as the interpersonal factors which influence professional interaction and that are specific and unique to projects in geospatial science and technology. Students …

GEOG 408D/L. Spatial Database Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 206/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408DL. Advanced concepts in spatial database management. This course explores the management and design of spatial datasets and their association with Geographical Information Systems. Students will be introduced to concepts such as the principles of spatial database planning, design, implementation, and administration. Final projects will result …

GEOG 408E/L. GIS Automation and Customization and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisites: GEOG 306/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408EL. This course exposes students to GIS automation using industry standard programming systems. Basic programming concepts and methodologies for customizing and/or extending the available functions in ArcGIS are introduced. Available for graduate credit. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab.

GEOG 408F/L. WebGIS and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 206/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408FL. Introduction to the design, development, and implementation of interactive and accessible customized web-based GIS applications. The course provides an overview of conceptual and theoretical backgrounds of WebGIS system architecture and offers programming concepts and skill sets underlying development and implementation of distributed geographical information on …

GEOG 408H/L. GIS in Water Resource Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 306/L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEOG 408HL. The course introduces the principles of hydrology and the applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in hydrologic modeling and water resource management. Selected GIS-based techniques will be applied in practical sessions. The main focus of the course will be on the use of digital data …

GEOG 408I/L. Geospatial Big Data Analytics and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 306/L. Recommended Preparatory: GEOG 408E/L. This course will introduce the theory, techniques, and analytical methods for working with big data sources using geographic information systems (GIS). Spatial Big Data ranges from mobile phone and traffic data to social media platforms and credit card transactions, to air quality sensors and satellite imagery. Methods for …

GEOG 409/L. Digital Cartography and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: GEOG 305/L. Corequisite: GEOG 409L. Advanced design, use and presentation of maps and information graphics. Course will explore computer-assisted cartography in theory and practice. Topics will include cartographic communications, data acquisition and design for computer generated mapping. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 414. Hydroclimatology (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 311. Details of the hydrologic cycle, emphasizing cloud physics, precipitation, evaporation and runoff. Nature and causes of rainfall variability in time and space. Cloud seeding. Irrigation and water supply problems. Field studies. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 416. Earth’s Changing Climate (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 103 or GEOG 103A or GEOG 311. Analysis of Earth’s changing climate throughout geologic time. Includes consideration of the mechanisms of climate change, techniques of climate reconstruction and analysis, and the chronology of climate change. Examines the issue of global warming, climate data, climate models and predictions. Considers the environmental impact of global …

GEOG 417. California for Educators (3)

Prerequisite: Limited to members of Multiple Subject Credential Program. Examination of California, focusing on its political, social and economic growth, its settlement, its population patterns, resource exploitation and human-environment interaction. Spatial and temporal variation of these factors is emphasized. (Cross-listed with HIST 417.)

GEOG 444. Conservation (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Lecture-discussion on the precepts, concepts, practices and problems in the human utilization of resources. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 449. Mixed Methods for Human and Environmental Geography (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division course in geography; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: GEOG 300. This course provides training in a selection of qualitative and quantitative methods and their applications in human and environmental geography. This is useful for research into human dimensions of space, place, and landscape; the human-environment interface; and socio-ecological processes. …

GEOG 460/L. Spatial Analysis and Comparison and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 360 or equivalent. Corequisite: GEOG 460L. Statistical analysis of quantitative data by areas. Measurement of aggregation and concentration, description of a real distribution and gradients, and significance of similarities and differences. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

GEOG 465/L. Fluvial Geomorphology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 365. Corequisite: GEOG 465L. Role of water in landform development—weathering, overland flow, open channel characteristics, drainage pattern evolution and drainage basin characteristics. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours field activity.

GEOG 467/L. Arid Lands Geomorphology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: GEOG 365. Corequisite: GEOG 467L. Landform development in deserts—origin of deserts, erosion and sedimentation in dry climates, morphology, and aeolian processes. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours field activity.

GEOG 470. The Geography of Aquatic Ecosystems (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOG 101A; Instructor consent required for graduate students. This course focuses on the geographic study of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands, the biogeography of aquatic organisms, and on the methods and techniques used by geographers to study ecosystems including GIS and remote sensing. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 472. Water Transfers in the American West (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 370 or GEOG 365/L or permission of instructor; Instructor consent required for graduate students. This course examines the scientific foundations of water transfers across the American West, with special emphasis on California. The course examines the nature and implications of climate variability over the past 200 years and then, after California’s accession to …

GEOG 473. Water Quality in the Managed Environment (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 370 or GEOG 365/L or permission of instructor; Instructor consent required for graduate students. This course examines the nature of water-quality management including baseline properties of natural water, sources of surface and subsurface pollution, state and national policies on water quality, and the type and effectiveness of treatment processes in practice today. Specific …

GEOG 474. Water in Dryland Environments (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 414 or permission of instructor; Instructor consent required for graduate students. The purpose of the class is to provide an understanding of the hydrologic cycle and its relationship to climate in dryland environments. Details of the hydrologic cycle, emphasizing precipitation, evapotranspiration, and runoff will be covered. The nature and causes of rainfall variability …

GEOG 476. Principles of River Restoration (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 365/L or GEOG 465/L or permission of instructor; Instructor consent required for graduate students. Introduction to the principles of river restoration integrating the fundamentals of water science, technology, and practice in projects designed to improve and restore fluvial environments. The course focuses on the hydrologic, morphologic and ecologic principles needed for understanding and …

GEOG 482. Population, Migration, and the Environment (3)

Prerequisite: Lower division course in geography. This course introduces students to the intertwining concepts of human population, migration patterns, and the global environment through the lens of geography. Students will critically discuss current population questions across the globe and use various geospatial analysis techniques to visualize these issues. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 483. Transportation Planning (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. The course primarily focuses on the interrelated systems of urban transportation and urban land use and their effects on the growth, development and future of human settlements. The course will provide fundamental core competencies for students seeking employment in transportation planning in the public or private sectors. Four …

GEOG 486. Medical Geography (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division course in geography; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of the spatial distribution of human diseases at world, regional, national and local scales. Special emphasis on understanding the physical and cultural factors associated with patterns of disease. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 490. Senior Project (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 300 or consent of instructor. Preparation of a research proposal and writing of a senior paper under close faculty supervision. Available for graduate credit.

GEOG 494. Internship (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG major with senior standing. Upon prior approval of the Internship Coordinator, a student may earn 3 units of credit in the major for professional service as a geographer in a public agency or private organization. No more than 3 units may be applied to the major. Academic Internship course.

GEOG 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Appropriate upper division course in Geography. Selected topics in Geography, with course content to be determined. Topics may be repeated for credit.

GEOG 497A-F. Senior Seminar in Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Appropriate upper division course in geography. In a seminar setting, students are guided in reading, research and writing on selected topics within one of the major subdisciplines of geography. Each seminar focuses on a particular subject within the designated subdiscipline. Subjects will vary and be determined each semester. Available for graduate credit. Seminars in …

GEOG 550F. Forensic Geography (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 306 or an additional statistics course; or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to help students learn how to use the tools and techniques of the forensic geographer so they may prepare to do research in criminology or prepare for careers in the criminal justice field. Class activities will be split …

GEOG 600. Geographic Thought, Analysis and Research (3)

Introductory seminar designed for first-year graduate students. Analysis of the trends in the theories, methods and problems pertinent to contemporary geography, including a review of the skills required for geographical research, analysis and writing.

GEOG 610A-E. Geomorphology (3)

(A) Fluvial, (E) Special Topics in Geomorphology.

GEOG 630A-E. Environmental Studies (3)

(A) Environmental Geography, (B) Biogeography, (C) Special Topics in Environmental Geography, (E) Human Impact on the Environment.

GEOG 650A-D. Urban Geography (3)

(A) Special Topics in Urban Geography, (C) Urban Social Geography, (D) Metropolitan Los Angeles.

GEOG 690A-J. Geographic Information Science (3)

Selected topics in digital mapping with course content to be determined. Can be taken twice for 6 units. Course Title GEOG 690A Special Topics in GIS GEOG 690B Spatial Statistics GEOG 690D Remote Sensing GEOG 690E WebGIS GEOG 690G Applications in GIS GEOG 690J Foundations in Geographic Information Science

GEOG 696. Directed Graduate Research (3)

To be taken near the end of the student’s graduate program and prior to GEOG 698. Supervised research leading to the development of a thesis topic, preparation of a preliminary bibliography and a formal thesis proposal, and selection of a faculty thesis committee.

GEOG 698. Thesis (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 696. Researching and writing the master’s thesis, under the supervision of the student’s faculty thesis committee. Only one enrollment permitted.

GEOG 698D. Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 696. Classified graduate students in Geography/GIS option. Researching and completing a GIS project in collaboration with faculty. Only one enrollment permitted.

GEOG 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, graduate coordinator and department chair. Maximum of 3 units may be applied to the student’s program and only to the elective requirement in the Option 1 Program.

HIST 110. World History to 1500 (3)

Introduction to major developments in world history from the emergence of complex societies until 1500 c.e. Examines processes of social, cultural, political and economic change throughout this period and emphasizes comparisons of and interconnections between, major world civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

HIST 111. World History Since 1500 (3)

An introduction to the major developments in world history from 1500 to the present. The course examines the processes of social, cultural, economic and political change throughout this period and emphasizes the production of global cultures and reactions to them. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

HIST 150. Western Civilization to 1500 (3)

An introduction to the major topics, themes, literature and dreams of Western Civilization, from its ancient origins to the early modern era. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

HIST 151. Western Civilization Since 1500 (3)

An introduction to major social, political, intellectual and cultural developments in modern Western Civilization from the Renaissance to the present. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

HIST 161. The History of Latin America from Pre-Columbian Times to Today (3)

Learn about the important historical contributions made by indigenous peoples, Africans, Europeans, and immigrants from all over the globe to the rich history of what comes to be known as Latin America. Explore the history of the Maya, Mexica, and Inca civilizations. Understand the violent encounters between indigenous peoples and Europeans; the rise of independent …

HIST 185. Middle East from 600CE to the Present (3)

Explore the historical development of various regions from North Africa to Southwest Asia. Examine milestones in the history of this part of the world including the emergence of Islam, Abbasid culture, the Mongol conquests, gunpowder empires, European imperialism, and the rise of modern Middle Eastern states. Understand the diversity of experiences that continue to shape …

HIST 192. History of Modern East Asia (3)

Learn about the historical roots of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese societies from the 1700s to the present. Consider the scars left by Western imperialism in the 1800s. Trace the emergence of nationalist movements. Examine Japanese imperialism in Asia and the impact of the Second World War. Explore the communist revolution in China. Discover how East …

HIST 196A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)

Selected topics in history with course content to be determined.

HIST 210. A History of the Jewish People (3)

Study of the Jewish people from their beginnings in the ancient Near East to the establishment of the modern state of Israel. (Cross-listed with JS 210.) (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

HIST 270. The United States to 1865 (3)

Survey of the political and social development of the U.S. through the Civil War. (Available for General Education, C3 American History, Institutions and Ideals.)

HIST 271. The United States Since 1865 (3)

Survey of the political and social development of the U.S. since the Civil War. (Available for General Education, C3 American History, Institutions and Ideals.)

HIST 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)

Selected topics in History with course content to be determined.

HIST 301. The Historian’s Craft (3)

What do historians do, and how do they do it? Learn how to think, write, and research like a historian. Improve your critical thinking. Enhance your ability to analyze historical documents, construct logical and compelling arguments, and convey information to others. History majors must pass this course with a grade of “C” or better in …

HIST 303. Themes in Western Civilization Before 1500 (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intended to introduce upper division students to the concepts and unresolved problems that have shaped the development of Western Civilization prior to 1500. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

HIST 304. Themes in Western Civilization After 1500 (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Themes in the institutional, political, socioeconomic and cultural development of Western Civilization since 1500. (Available for General Education, C2 Humanities.)

HIST 305. Cultural History of the United States (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. American people’s evolving patterns of life in such areas as religion, education, art, architecture and music, reading matter, sports, travel, family life, and, in recent times, motion pictures, radio and television. Emphasis is placed on the values and implications revealed by the range and popularity of cultural …

HIST 340. Europe and the Early Modern World (3)

Europe experienced dramatic change between Columbus’s voyages and Napoleon’s wars. Around the world, meanwhile, Europeans coexisted and clashed with other peoples as they settled, enslaved, and helped build networks of exchange that became truly global. Delve into debates about witches and cannibals. Examine confrontations between colonists and Indians on the American frontier. Understand how encounters …

HIST 341. Modern Europe Since the French Revolution (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explore important developments in the history of Europe from the French Revolution to the present day. Investigate social and political unrest, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, the World Wars, and the construction of the European Union. Understand the forces that have brought Europe together and torn it apart. …

HIST 342. The World Since 1945 (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explore major political, economic, social, and cultural developments from the end of the Second World War to the present. Learn about the Cold War, communism, decolonization, globalization, and major trends in science, technology, and health. Among the activities in the course, you may find yourself engaging in …

HIST 345. War in History and Film (3)

Movies, images, and texts have historically shaped popular support for and opposition to war, created heroic figures, reinforced ideals of gender and race, and promoted nations and nationalism. Develop a critical understanding of historical perceptions of war by analyzing film, history, and literature.

HIST 349A. American Women I (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explore the history of American women from indigenous societies to the first women’s movement. Examine the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality. See how women navigated a biased legal system. Understand the limits of citizenship in early America. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.) …

HIST 349B. Women in American History Since 1848 (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of women’s roles and status since 1848. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.) (IC)

HIST 350. History of Women (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Roles and contributions of women from ancient times to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of women’s movements from the 18th century to the present. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

HIST 351. History of Sexual Behavior (3)

Historical study of sexual behavior from ancient times to the present.

HIST 357. History of the Holocaust (3)

Learn about how and why the Nazis and their collaborators persecuted and murdered Jews and other groups they deemed inferior. Survey long-term causes such as anti-Semitism as well as short-term factors including World War I and II. Read about Hitler’s racial ideology; delve into the world of Auschwitz and the concentration camps; analyze the actions …

HIST 366. Popular Culture in Latin America (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Learn about Latin American history by exploring its music, films, food, festivals, and religion. Uncover the complexities of the region. Develop a better understanding of Latin America’s rich and diverse popular culture. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

HIST 369. Native Peoples and Cultures (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Challenge common American stereotypes of native peoples propagated in films and other media. Gain an understanding of the diverse cultures and experiences of native communities within the present-day borders of the United States. Explore themes of indigenous identity, historical trauma, and resilience. Examine how American Indians survived, …

HIST 370. Questions in American History to the Civil War (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examine American history from early indigenous societies to the U.S. Civil War. Learn about Native American cultures, European and African migrations, and regional patterns of settlement. Understand the development of slavery, democracy, women’s rights, capitalism, and westward expansion. (Available for General Education, C3 American History, Institutions and …

HIST 371. Questions in American History Since the Civil War (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Deepen your understanding of modern American history by delving into issues such as immigration, migration, urbanization, and suburbanization. Examine social movements and civil rights from Reconstruction to the twenty-first century. Investigate political and economic tensions in America and the rise of the U.S. as a global superpower. …

HIST 374. Hollywood and History (3)

Explores the relationship of classic Hollywood movies to the political, social and cultural history of 20th century America. By placing each film in its historical context and examining it as a primary source, students will learn to evaluate the extent to which American movies have expressed or challenged the dominant political themes and social and …

HIST 380. Los Angeles: Past, Present, Future (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Multidisciplinary investigation of the Los Angeles urban area—its patterns of population and resources distribution; its historical, economic, social and cultural developments; and policies models designed to cope with its problems—and to develop its potential as an ethnically diverse metropolis on the Pacific Rim. Application of social science methodology. …

HIST 389. Disability in American History and Law (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Explore the history of disability in the United States. Understand how perceptions of disability have changed over time and how laws designed to exclude and protect individuals with disabilities have developed along with these changes. Explore the intersectionality of disability with other marginalized groups. (Available for General …

HIST 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)

Selected topics in history with course content to be determined.

HIST 409. History of the Jews in the Modern Era (3)

A history of the Jewish people from the 17th century to the present. Principal themes include the transformation of the traditional community, the changes in Jews’ political status, the emergence of modern anti-Semitism, and ethnic and gender distinctions within Jewry. (Cross-listed with JS 409.)

HIST 409A-Z. Historical Field-Study (3)

Prerequisites: HIST 301; Completion of lower division survey courses. Historical study conducted off-campus at historical locations in the U.S., Europe, Latin America and Asia. This course augments previous classroom work by immersing students in the topic’s environment. Fee required.

HIST 410. The Ancient Greek World (3)

Discover the history of the Greeks from Athenian democracy to the conquests of Alexander the Great and the spread of Greek culture from the Mediterranean to central Asia. Hone your critical thinking skills through encounters with Socrates, Plato, and the earliest historians Herodotus and Thucydides.

HIST 411. Rome from Republic to Empire (3)

Trace the history of Rome from its mythic origins, to a resilient republic, to an empire that stretched from Britain to Mesopotamia. Understand what it meant to be a citizen of Rome. Explore the tensions between rich and poor, the might of the Roman legions, and the many debates about Rome’s decline.

HIST 415. The Byzantine World (3)

Byzantine history and civilization, from the founding of Constantinople in 324 A.D. to the Turkish conquest in 1453.

HIST 417. California for Educators (3)

Prerequisite: Available to Liberal Studies, Pre-Credential and ITEP students. Examination of California, focusing on its political, social and economic growth, its settlement, its population patterns, resource exploitation and human-environment interaction. Spatial and temporal variation of these factors is emphasized. (Cross-listed with GEOG 417.)

HIST 420. Getting Medieval: Europe From the Barbarian Kingdoms to the Black Death (3)

Wander through medieval kingdoms to deepen your understanding of knights and Crusades, chivalry and romance, faith and loyalty, violence and death. Encounter medieval thinkers, rulers, peasants, and pilgrims and learn about how they interpreted their expanding horizons from the early to later Middle Ages. Consider the nature of medieval beliefs; the ideal of devotion to …

HIST 424. Medieval Middle East (3)

Trace the development of Southwest Asia and North Africa from the Early Islamic period to the Mongol destruction of Baghdad in 1258. Discover how Islamicate conceptions of religion, government, and culture influenced the diverse communities of the region.

HIST 425. Early Modern Middle East (3)

Trace the development of Southwest Asia and North Africa from the Mongol destruction of Baghdad in 1258 to the rise and fall of the Gunpowder Empires. Explore how these empires, and the cultures that developed under their control, interacted. Discover the encounters and relationships that emerged between this important part of the world and the …

HIST 426. A History of the Modern Middle East 1798-1979 (3)

Preparatory: HIST 185. This course will trace the development of religion, government, culture and society in the Middle East in the modern period (1798-1979 CE). This course is designed to be an investigation of different perspectives on the history of the Middle East from 1789, the date of Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt, until roughly the …

HIST 427. Israel’s History and Peoples (3)

A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society. (Cross-listed with JS 427.)

HIST 428. History of the British Empire (3)

At its height, the British Empire was the largest empire in the history of the world. Explore the causes and consequences of British imperialism from its origins in Ireland and North America to its spectacular collapse in Asia and Africa. Learn about the American Revolution from the British point of view, the growth and abolition …

HIST 429. History of Chocolate: Commodities in World Exchanges (3)

Recommended Preparatory: HIST 301. This course explores the history of chocolate with an emphasis on the impact and meaning that cacao and chocolate have had on societies around the world from pre-Columbian times to the 20th century. Class discussions will focus on the production and consumption of cacao and chocolate as a means to uncover …

HIST 433. Public History (3)

Introduction to the theory, history and practice of public history (the presentation and interpretation of history for the general public). Available for graduate credit.

HIST 434. European Imperialism (3)

Learn about the rise and fall of European empires from the Spanish conquest of the Americas, to the British Raj in India, to human rights abuses in the Belgian Congo. Analyze European views of non-European people through art, film, and literature. Follow Captain Cook across the Pacific and trace Henry Stanley’s epic search for David …

HIST 435. Africa, Africans, and the World: From Early Humans to the Slave Trade (3)

Take a journey from the origin of early African peoples to the encounters between Africans and Europeans. Discover complex understandings of the African continent: from the cradle of mankind to the early African civilizations that developed there. Examine early African cultures and religions, including African contributions to the development of Christianity and Islam. Hone your …

HIST 436. Africa, Africans, and the World Since the Slave Trade (3)

Most of Africa was controlled by Africans until the Scramble for Africa. Explore how Africans confronted European imperialism and how the ensuing struggle reshaped the continent. Understand how Africans responded to this challenge, as Ethiopians and Liberians, for example, maintained their independence and by contrast the Congolese and South Africans confronted economic exploitation and settler …

HIST 441. The Second World War (3)

Discover the many ways in which the Second World War was a watershed experience in modern history. Learn about appeasement, the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact, and German blitzkrieg tactics. Trace Japan’s bid for hegemony in Asia. Follow the war in the Pacific from Pearl Harbor to Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Examine the Holocaust and the consequences of …

HIST 444. Renaissance and Reformation (3)

Learn about the Italian Renaissance, the spread of European humanism, popular belief and witchcraft, the Protestant Reformation, the Wars of Religion, and the Scientific Revolution.

HIST 446. 19th Century Europe (3)

Investigate major transformations in European history from Napoleon to the First World War. Learn about the Industrial Revolution; the emergence of liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the spread of imperialism; changing gender roles; and the rise of a consumer society.

HIST 449. Russia to 1917 (3)

Learn about Russian history from the earliest settlements to the fall of the Romanov dynasty in 1917. Explore how geography, climate, and religion helped shape society. Trace the rise of Imperial Russia under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great. Discover the nineteenth century, the era of reforms, and the golden age of Russian arts …

HIST 450. Russia Since 1917 (3)

Investigate the history of the Soviet Union, the first socialist state, from its revolutionary birth to its demise in 1991. Learn about what it was like to be a Soviet citizen during the dictatorship of the proletariat. Explore industrialization and collectivization under Stalin. Find out about Soviet life during the Nazi invasion. Better understand the …

HIST 452. Medieval and Tudor Britain (3)

Consider innovations and crises from the Norman Conquest to the Tudors. Learn about the Battle of Hastings, Domesday, Magna Carta, Robin Hood, the Black Death, popular revolts, the Wars of the Roses, the witch craze, the Tudor dynasty, and the English Reformation.

HIST 453. Modern Britain (3)

Learn the story of how a small island kingdom became the first industrial nation and built (and lost) the largest empire in the history of the world. Delve into the world of Queen Victoria, Sherlock Holmes, Jack the Ripper, Winston Churchill, James Bond, and Harry Potter. Tour a Georgian mansion and walk the narrow cobblestone …

HIST 456. Modern France (3)

Over the last five hundred years, France has transformed itself from a medieval kingdom into a modern state. Explore how the French Revolution and Napoleon broke radically with the past and helped usher in the modern world. Investigate how the French have struggled with issues of identity and diversity from the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre, …

HIST 457. Modern Germany (3)

Learn about the development of Germany from Bismarck to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Explore the rise of Prussia and the establishment of Imperial Germany. Trace the impact of the First World War and the Treaty of Versailles. Discover the arts and culture of Weimar society that helped shape ideas of modernity. Find out …

HIST 462. Revolutionary Latin America (3)

Explore Latin America from the Haitian to the Mexican Revolution by focusing on the region’s peoples and their experiences. Acquire a better understanding of independence, elite and popular politics, enslavement, race and nation, gender roles, the environment, and popular resistance from the 1800s to the early 1900s.

HIST 463. 20th Century Latin America (3)

Study of Latin American history since 1914, with emphasis on the impact of modernization upon the traditional order, efforts toward inter-American understanding, and greater interaction with the contemporary world.

HIST 465. Clashes and Encounters in the Caribbean (3)

Discover the rich history of a region that became the heart of an emerging global capitalism. Study the expansion of the sugar economy and its dependence on enslaved Africans. Discover how modern multi-ethnic nations emerged from this colonial history by focusing on Caribbean people’s resistance to imperialism and inequality. Delve into the many ways communities …

HIST 466. Mexico (3)

Internal development of Mexico and how it has affected hemispheric and world affairs. Special attention is devoted to Mexico’s interaction with the U.S.

HIST 467. Origins and Consequences of the Mexican Revolution (3)

Origin, development and consequences of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and its domestic and international repercussions.

HIST 468. Social and Intellectual History of Latin America (3)

Examine the rich histories of Latin American peoples by diving into their art, literature, music, cinematography, and other artistic expressions. Develop a deep appreciation for the social and intellectual diversity of Latin America and for the historical circumstances that contributed to it.

HIST 469W. The Atlantic World (3)

This course will expose students to the integration of the peoples and regions around the Atlantic Ocean beginning with Christopher Columbus’ voyage of 1492 and ending with the global race for colonies in the mid-19th century. Readings and discussions will focus on the historical process responsible for connecting the four continents surrounding the Atlantic Ocean …

HIST 470. The United States: The Colonial Period (3)

Investigate early North American history from pre-colonial times through the Seven Years’ War. Learn about indigenous lifeways before European contact and how native peoples contested and negotiated with colonial societies. Compare how European colonizers migrated to and within North America and how they built economies, societies, and political systems. Understand the creation of racial slavery …

HIST 471. United States: American Revolution and Constitution (3)

Delve into the Revolutionary and Early National Periods in U.S. history. Analyze the origins of the American Revolution and its colonial, imperial, and global dimensions. Learn what divided patriots and loyalists. Examine the development and consequences of the U.S. Constitution. Understand the experiences of women, indigenous peoples, and African Americans in an era of revolution.

HIST 472. The United States: The Era of Expansion, 1800-1848 (3)

Growth of the nation from the election of Jefferson through the age of Jackson to the completion of continental expansion at the end of the Mexican War.

HIST 473A. Civil War and Reconstruction (3)

Better understand the origins, course, and consequences of the U.S. Civil War. Engage with important questions concerning westward expansion, economic development, slavery and abolition, political realignment, social transformation, race and racism, and historical memory.

HIST 473B. The United States: 1877-1920 (3)

Interpretive survey of the political, cultural, diplomatic and social history of the U.S. during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era through World War I.

HIST 474A. The United States: 1920-1960 (3)

Interpretive survey of the political, cultural, diplomatic and social history of the U.S. from the end of World War I through the election of John F. Kennedy.

HIST 474B. The United States: 1960-Present (3)

Interpretive survey of the political, cultural, diplomatic and social history of the recent and contemporary U.S. from the election of John F. Kennedy to the present.

HIST 475. Women in Modern United States History: 1920-Present (3)

Study of the roles, status and contributions of women in the U.S. from 1920 to the present.

HIST 479A. United States Economic History to 1865 (3)

Examines the growth and development of the U.S. economy from colonial times through the end of the Civil War. Among the themes to be considered are the regional variations in economic development; the emergence of a liberal capitalist economic order; the economic significance of new systems of production, transportation, banking and communication; and the impact …

HIST 479B. U.S. Economic History Since 1865 (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate students must have instructor’s consent. Recommended Corequisite: ECON 300. Examines the growth and development of the U.S. economy from the end of the Civil War to the present. Among the themes to be considered are the relationship between the state and the private sector in a free market economy; the rise of big …

HIST 480. Early American Borders (3)

Borders shape our daily lives and how we see the world. We tend to think of borders as rigid, but early American boundaries were fluid intercultural zones known as borderlands, where indigenous, African, and European peoples adapted, coexisted, and struggled. Better understand how borders functioned from the colonial period to the U.S.-Mexico War, and how …

HIST 481. Modern American Borders (3)

Borders shape our daily lives and how we see the world. Investigate the increasing rigidity and militarization of American borders over the past hundred and fifty years. Explore how debates over borders, immigration, and citizenship have influenced communities within the U.S.

HIST 485B. Latin America’s Long Cold War (3)

Latin America during the Cold War became a region for proxy wars between the United States and the Soviet Union. Examine the impact of U.S. policies and learn how Latin Americans fought for political, cultural, and economic independence. Delve into the early history of U.S. interventions in Latin America from the Monroe Doctrine (1823) to …

HIST 485C. The United States and the War in Iraq, 2003-11 (3)

Analysis of the second U.S.-Iraq war, with an emphasis in U.S. involvement, from its inception and planning through the phases of invasion, occupation, insurgency, sectarian conflict, counter-insurgency, and U.S. withdrawal of forces. The experiences of soldiers and post-combat veterans will also be studied.

HIST 486A. History of Los Angeles (3)

Evolution of the metropolis of Los Angeles from pre-Spanish days to the present.

HIST 488. California (3)

The Golden State has long had a reputation as a trend-setting and diverse place. But it also has a history of conquest as well as racial and ethnic oppression. Explore the political, economic, and social growth of California from indigenous societies to the present.

HIST 489. A History of the African-American People in the United States (3)

Examination of basic themes and issues in the history of the African-American people in the U.S. and the relevance of those themes and issues to the patterns of today.

HIST 490. Emperors, Philosophers, and Rebels: Imperial China to 1600 (3)

Explore how Chinese philosophers imagined a better world during the Warring States period. Study the rise of a unified Chinese empire and how a balance was struck between rulers and their subjects. Learn about China’s long history of interplay with the Eurasian steppe as merchants and missionaries crossed the silk roads, and statesmen and generals …

HIST 491A. Making and Breaking Empires in Early Modern China (3)

Learn how Manchu tribesmen on Asia’s remote northeastern borderlands conquered China and much of Central Asia and created the vast and enduring Qing Empire. Examine how the Manchus and Chinese came to a mutually beneficial accommodation and how China prospered in the 1700s. Explore the rise of the opium trade and learn about the massive …

HIST 491B. Revolution and Reform in Modern China (3)

In the early twentieth century, China seemed backward and immobile, unable to deal with foreign empires and their modern technologies. Examine how reformers and revolutionaries sought to transform Chinese culture, society, and government to suit the modern world. Learn about the radical transformation of China under Mao Zedong and the Chinese Communist Party that brought …

HIST 493. Continuity and Change in Modern Japanese History (3)

Learn how the Tokugawa government unified feudal Japan in 1603 and brought about an age of prosperity, stability, and cultural efflorescence. Explore how patriotic samurai, reacting to Western imperialism, led a rebellion that overthrew the government to build a modern Japan. Study Japan’s effort to dominate Asia and the destruction of its empire in the …

HIST 494SOC. Internship Program (3)

Pre-professional practicum in a history-based field, open to History major and minors with 3.0 GPA.

HIST 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)

Selected topics in history with course content to be determined.

HIST 497A-Z. Proseminar (3)

General principles of historical research, with application to specific areas of history and historiography. Grade of “C” or better is required to receive credit for this course.

HIST 498. Tutorial in History (1-3)

Reading and discussion in a specific field or on a specific topic in a small group. May be repeated: 6 units maximum. Grade of “C” or better is required to receive credit for this course.

HIST 508. Practicum in Archival Administration (3)

Prerequisites: HIST 505; Graduate standing or instructor consent. Application of the theory of archival administration, including collection, preservation, arrangement and exhibition of historic materials. Students may complete the practicum at one of several sites, including the Urban and Old China Hands Archives at the CSUN University Library, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and the Natchez …

HIST 510. Colloquium in Greek and Hellenistic History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Covers historiographical writings on important developments in Greek and Hellenistic history from the Bronze Age through the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars and the trial of Socrates, and concludes with a discussion of Hellenistic Greece and the influence of Greek culture in the broader Mediterranean world.

HIST 511. Colloquium in Roman History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed historiographical readings and discussion focusing on Roman history from the Republic through the fall of the Empire.

HIST 531. Colloquium in Modern World History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Designed for students who will one day teach world history, as well as those who are interested in trans-national, trans-regional integrative history. Provides a practical and theoretical approach to world history since 1500 by exploring the vibrant and volatile debate over “The Rise of The West.” Topics include industrialization, …

HIST 541. Colloquium in Modern European History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Survey of major historiographical debates in modern European history, including the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of bourgeois society, nationalism, imperialism and the First and Second World Wars.

HIST 545. Colloquium in the History of the Middle East (3)

Prerequisite: HIST 185. Recommended Preparatory: HIST 424 and HIST 426. This course is an examination of major themes in Middle Eastern history from the Arab/Islamic conquest to the present. Possible topics include examinations of cultural, economic, intellectual, religious and social history. The course will underscore historiography and the effect of modern political debates on the …

HIST 546. The Holocaust and Genocide for Educators (3)

An overview of the Holocaust and the concept of genocide, with a focus on the analysis and evaluation of varied resources for educators, including film, photographs, literature, art, music, documents and other primary source materials. (Cross-listed with JS 546.)

HIST 548. History and Memory (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This graduate seminar explores theory, methodology, and scholarship related to history and memory. The course considers the power of memory in shaping public interpretation and knowledge about the past and the importance of studying collective memory. The course also examines how memory is contested and reshaped. Major topics include how historical memory …

HIST 562. Colloquium in Latin American Social and Economic History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Focuses on the relationship between economic change and social structures in Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. By the end of the semester, students will have achieved an understanding of the social and economic events that combined to produce the societies and nations that constitute Latin America …

HIST 563. Colloquium in Latin American Political, Institutional and Military History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Examines the historical evolution of the political and institutional structure in Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. By the end of the semester, students have achieved an understanding of the political development of the Latin American states within a broad social and economic context. Emphasis on critical …

HIST 570. The American Revolution (3)

This course will help students come to terms with the late 18th century imperial crisis that brought about the rise of the independent U.S. Readings and discussions will focus on the origins, progress and results of the American Revolution.

HIST 571. Seminar in Colonial American History (3)

This is a reading intensive seminar devoted to the history of early America, from European settlement to the American Revolution. Students will familiarize themselves with classic and cutting-edge scholarship related to major topics within the field of early American history. Different approaches and methods for doing this type of history will be discussed. And students …

HIST 572. Colloquium in 19th Century U.S. History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Examination of the major social, economic, political and cultural themes in the U.S. during the 19th century. Topics include the industrial, market and transportation revolutions; slavery; the Civil War and its aftermath; the rise of the (urban) middle class; the frontier and territorial expansion; and the cultural life of …

HIST 573. Colloquium in U.S. History: Gilded Age and Progressive Era (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed historiographical readings surveying major political, social, cultural and economic trends in the United States from 1877 to 1929. Topics include race relations, the rise of big business, immigration, urbanization, progressivism, the emergence of an American empire, the impact of war, nativism and gender relations.

HIST 574. Colloquium in Recent U.S. History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed historiographical readings surveying major political, social, cultural and economic trends in the U.S. from 1932 to the present. Topics include the Great Depression, World War II, anti-communism, the origins of the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, student unrest, Vietnam, and the Reagan years.

HIST 577. Colloquium in U.S. Social and Intellectual History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings focusing on selected topics in the social and intellectual history of the U.S.

HIST 585. Colloquium in U.S. Southern History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Readings in history of the American South from the colonial era through modern times, with special emphasis on issues of regional identity, class and race relations, slavery, popular culture, regional politics and the continuity of southern culture.

HIST 586. Colloquium in U.S. Women and Gender History (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings on selected topics in the history of women and gender in American society from colonial times to the present.

HIST 594. History Internship Program (3)

Places M.A. students in pre-professional internship positions in public, nonprofit, advocacy, and commercial institutions where they earn credit in a directed program of applied field study. Interested students should contact the History Department’s internship coordinator in advance of the semester in which the internship will be undertaken. Available to students enrolled in the History M.A. …

HIST 601. Theory and Historiography (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Sophisticated, graduate-level introduction to history as a discipline. Surveys the development of history as a discipline, examines the various genres of historical writing, explores issues and problems of historical interpretation, and considers the how historians use theoretical models from other disciplines to shape their work. Readings include seminal works by major historians.

HIST 612. Research Seminar in the Roman Empire (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Seminar on the Roman Empire from the Julio-Claudians to the fall of the empire in the West. Topics include social, political and intellectual history, the rise of Christianity, the transformation of the empire, theories about the fall of Rome and studies of individual historians of the period.

HIST 620. Research Seminar in the Middle Ages (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in western European, Iberian, Byzantine, and/or Mediterranean history during the period between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance.

HIST 630. Research Seminar in World History (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. In addition to discussing the methodological issues involved in studying and researching world history, each student writes an original, primary source-based research paper on a topic in world history that is trans-national, regional or comparative in focus.

HIST 640. Research Seminar in Early Modern European History (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in European history from the Renaissance through the Napoleonic period.

HIST 641. Research Seminar in Modern European History (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in European history since the French Revolution.

HIST 660. Research Seminar in Latin American History (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on topics in the history of Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. Students will conduct an in-depth examination employing original (primary) sources on a specific problem or issue in the history of Latin America.

HIST 671. Research Seminar in Colonial American History (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in American history prior to the American Revolution.

HIST 674. Research Seminar in Recent U.S. History (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on the U.S. in the 1980s. Students focus on a specific topic within this period or closely related to it that is suitable for primary-source research that can be done at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, the CSUN University Library or other local archives. The main …

HIST 681. Research Seminar in the U.S. West (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Students conduct an in-depth examination employing original (primary) sources relating to a problem or issue in the history of the U.S. West.

HIST 692A-Z. Selected Topics in Research (3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Graduate Research Seminar in Selected Topics. Students read selected scholarship on the topic indicated and write an original research paper using primary and secondary sources. Successful papers may be developed and revised in HIST 698D: Graduate Culminating Project.

HIST 694. Practicum for Teaching Assistants (3-3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing. Working under the close supervision of departmental faculty and assigned to a specific undergraduate History course, students gain experience in creating assignments, grading papers and exams, leading discussion and review sessions, and giving lectures. Students have the opportunity to discuss issues and problems in teaching. May be repeated once for credit.

HIST 698. Thesis (3)

Students may enroll after they have completed 30 units of coursework and had their formal program approved. Students work on their thesis and take the written Proficiency Exam in their second area of study. Students have a 2-year limit in which to finish their thesis from the time they enroll in this course.

HIST 698D. Graduate Culminating Project (3)

Prerequisites: HIST 601 and two Graduate Level History Research Seminars. This culminating graduate course requires students to demonstrate their mastery of the historian’s craft. Students will revise an existing research paper that they produced in one of their graduate research seminar classes and transform it into a piece that could be submitted as a conference …

MPA 610. Seminar in Public Administration and Its Environment (3)

Introduces graduate students to the major areas within public administration and encourages them to relate this knowledge to their own experience and career. Considers the political, social and economic environment of public administration.

MPA 612A. Intergovernmental Relations (3)

Provides an in-depth examination and analysis of the dynamics of the legislative, political and intergovernmental processes. Analyzes the relationships of different levels and branches of government. Lobbying and change agents, decision-making procedures and media impacts are evaluated. Involvement in creating change and impacting decisions through the use of intergovernmental techniques is explored. Explores the roles …

MPA 620. Research Methods for Public Administration (3)

Discusses theory and limits of scientific inquiry, including quantitative and qualitative methods of analysis, and research design and implementation. Encourages critical analysis of the research underlying policy recommendations. Introduces students to a wide variety of social science research techniques and assists them in developing their own research projects.

MPA 622A. Policy Implementation and Program Evaluation (3)

Public administration is fundamentally a discipline interested in identifying public problems and implementing successful solutions. This course focuses exclusively on strategies for successful implementation of policy solutions in a competitive policy environment and on mechanisms for evaluating program success.

MPA 623A. Seminar in Effective Public Sector Management (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the effective functioning and management of organizations in the public sector. The course will focus on key management issues in public sector organizations and how to more effectively function in leadership roles in those organizations. Seminar participants are encouraged to relate work-life issues to theoretical perspectives and …

MPA 623B. Approaches and Methods in Program Evaluation (3)

Prerequisite: MPA 620. This course is designed to introduce students to the art and science of program evaluation, in both qualitative and quantitative ways. The course will review the dominant approaches to program evaluation and align these approaches to the social science research methods students study in MPA 620.

MPA 623D. Human Resources and the Basics of Competencies Measurement in Government (3)

This course will strategically look at the area of human resources and its link to firm performance through the balanced scorecard method. Specifically, students will learn how to develop the balanced scorecard and use it in the analysis of human resource decisions. Students will learn how to analyze the various human resource functional areas and …

MPA 630. Organization Theory and Human Behavior (3)

Traces the historical development of organization theory. Examines contemporary approaches to the study of organization. Discusses the various concepts, issues and approaches to the study of organizational behavior. Considers such concepts and processes as decision making, power, conflict, communication, leadership, motivation, group effectiveness, organizational change and personal and organizational autonomy.

MPA 632A. Organizational Leadership (3)

Explores the theories and styles of leadership. Students become familiar with and work toward the incorporation of the traits and habits of effective leaders. Reviews the necessary qualities required of and challenges and ethical dilemmas facing leaders in the public sector today.

MPA 632B. Strategic Management (3)

Examines how managers guide their organization in establishing goals, setting priorities, coordinating disparate activities and how they adjust to a changing environment. Class produces actual strategic plans.

MPA 632C. Communication in Public Organizations (3)

Highlights the function of communication as the life blood of public and nonprofit organizations, examining the nature of such communication issues as organizational culture, communication networks and message distortion, communication climate, communication and conflict, new communication technologies and communication during crisis situations as these impact public and nonprofit organizations.

MPA 632D. Overview of Nonprofit Organizational Management (3)

Designed to meet the needs of the professional administrator who works within the growing not-for-profit sector and also of the governmental employee who may work in cooperation with nonprofit sector. Governance through boards of directors, impacts of public policy, planning and policy formulation, funding and social marketing, effective partnership with business and government agencies, and …

MPA 632E. Strategic Planning, Needs Assessment and Program Design (3)

Examines the critical interconnection among strategic goals and objectives, including community needs assessment, program design and evaluation to the organization’s mission. Students will gain knowledge of the strategic-planning process through an experiential approach that creates the mission, identifies long-range goals and develops objectives and action plans. Provides students exposure to the full cycle of organizational …

MPA 632F. Issues and Problems in Human Resources, Board and Volunteer Management in Nonprofits (3)

This course is an introduction to the aggregate of human resource management process in complex organizations. The course will focus on current policy issues and problems that challenge today’s human resource specialists, supervisors and managers. Further, beyond the internal focus, the course also will examine the external human resources brought to nonprofit organizations by governing …

MPA 632G. Nonprofit Finance and Financial Management (3)

This course will expose the student to nonprofit financial management concepts and practices, including the framework for budgeting, financial analysis, internal controls and reporting. Students will engage in exercises and learn to use tools for financial management. The course will introduce and cement the partnership between nonprofit programming and effective financial management, and identify the …

MPA 632H. Funding and Resource Development for Nonprofit Organizations (3)

This course examines how fund-raising works and fits into nonprofit management as a whole. Students will learn what must be in place before a nonprofit organization raises money; how to plan and implement various approaches to raising funds, including grant writing, events and major gifts; and how to develop, manage and evaluate an annual fundraising …

MPA 632I. Program Implementation and Management for Nonprofit Services (3)

Examines the policies, strategies and the decision-making process to support successful program implementation from a manager’s perspective. Nonprofit policy formulation places emphasis on training managers to develop and analyze problems, both in terms of choosing goals and organizing resources to achieve them. Students will be given the opportunity to formulate strategic implementation considerations using environmental …

MPA 640. Public Policy Analysis (3)

Focuses on the methods and models of policy analysis used by public administrators. Emphasis on developing a perspective for putting social problems in the context of market and government failures. The basics of cost-benefit analysis and its application also are examined.

MPA 642A. Ethics and Professionalism (3)

Examines ethical issues and cases relevant to public administration. Focuses on professional relationships and responsibilities. Analyzes wider questions of public power, violence, deception and justice for their important relevance to public administration. Prepares students to analyze and confront ethical challenges in their professional life.

MPA 642B. Public Sector Labor Relations (3)

Accelerated intensive study of labor-relations concepts and role-playing participation in labor/management negotiation and formal arbitration.

MPA 643. Human Resources Management (3)

Focuses on the development of public service concepts, including personnel methods, testing and recruitment; interaction with other management functions and with the executive and legislative processes; human resources allocation; employee motivation and evaluation; manpower planning and forecasting; employee relations; affirmative action programs; and career planning and development.

MPA 644. Public Budgeting and Financial Administration (3)

Discusses budgeting processes and administrative control, including various techniques of budgeting; line item, performance, program and zero base; fiscal policy in implementing public policy; public revenues; sources and effect of principle taxes; intergovernmental aspects of revenue problems; and revenue sharing.

MPA 650. Public Policy Process (3)

Examines the formation of the public policies that government agencies must carry out. Traces the process of problem identification, agenda setting, policy proposal and adoption. Includes both legislative and regulatory policies. Explores the role of public managers as active participants in the policy-making process.

MPA 697S. Comprehensive Examination (3)

Students selecting this option prepare for examination in General Public Administration and in two Specialized Subfields.

MPA 698S. Graduate Project (3)

This culminating course requires students to demonstrate their mastery of their specialization in Public Administration. Students will produce a manuscript that displays originality and independent thinking and could be submitted as a professional conference paper, journal article, or academic writing sample. This course is to be taken only in the student’s final semester. (Credit/No Credit …

POLS 155. American Political Institutions (3)

Examination of the development and dynamics of American political institutions and political processes including a special emphasis on the role of minority groups. (Available for General Education, D3/D4 Constitution of the United States/State and Local Government.)

POLS 156. Introduction to Comparative Politics (3)

Introduction to the comparative study of government and politics. Its purpose is to familiarize students with the basic themes, concepts and theoretical approaches that are used by political scientists to explain governmental institutions and political processes in different regions of the world. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

POLS 197. Racial and Ethnic Politics (3)

Examination of the problems and politics of racial and national subgroups in America. Focuses on problems of ethnic identity, inequality and discrimination, and the impact of minority group politics on public policy. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

POLS 225. Elements of International Relations (3)

Analysis of the basic historical, geographical, economic, ideological and strategic factors that underlie and condition conflict and cooperation among actors in the contemporary international system. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

POLS 310. Problems of Political Economy (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the interaction of politics and economics in selected problem areas involving global, national and urban political-economic systems. The political role of global corporations and the political dimensions of trade, taxation and budgeting are considered. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

POLS 321. Comparative Political Ideologies (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines, compares and contrasts a range of political ideologies and their interpretation and application in contemporary societies. Attention is paid to defining the role and function of ideologies in specific contemporary states. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

POLS 332. Politics of Latin America (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introductory study of the politics of Latin America. Topics treated include dependency theory, revolution, the national security state, women in politics, theologies of liberation and redemocratization. Selected nations are used as case studies. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

POLS 347. The Judicial Process (3)

Examination of the dynamics of the national and state judicial systems, with emphasis on the workings of the Supreme Court within American separation of powers; internal procedures of decision making; external influences on the courts; the politics of selecting judges; and relations with other political institutions.

POLS 350. Great Questions in Politics (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Analysis of perennial political questions about power, authority, justice, equality and freedom. Materials include political and literary writings, films, case studies and legal cases. Aims throughout to relate these questions to contemporary political situations. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

POLS 355. American National, State and Local Governments (3)

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken POLS 155; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Detailed study of the structures and functions of the national government, and California state and local governments. Special attention given to the legislative and executive branches in the policy-making and administrative processes, as well as the constitutional bases …

POLS 360. Public Administration (3)

Analysis of the executive function in governmental processes together with a survey of the principles of administrative organization, personnel management, financial administration and public relations. Problems and trends in government service as a career are discussed.

POLS 361. Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Introduction to public policy approaches, contexts, processes and outcomes.

POLS 372. Principles and Methods of Political Science (3)

Study of the history, nature and current development of research in politics.

POLS 380. Los Angeles: Past, Present, Future (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Multidisciplinary investigation of the Los Angeles urban area–its patterns of population and resources distribution; its historical, economic, social and cultural developments; and policies models designed to cope with its problems and to develop its potential as an ethnically diverse metropolis on the Pacific Rim. Application of social science …

POLS 403. State and Local Government (3)

Study of the political, administrative, and judicial systems of states, counties, cities, and special districts. Intergovernmental relations, functions, trends and current problems. Available for graduate credit. (Available for General Education, D4 California State and Local Government.)

POLS 404. Urban Politics (3)

Study of the structures and processes that determine public priorities and programs in urban areas. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 405. Policy Framing and Agenda Setting (3)

Preparatory: At least one upper division course in public administration or American government. The allocation of attention within government precedes actionable policy decisions, but this process is often overlooked in the study of public policy. This course examines how the images, ideas, and rhetoric attached to societal problems dictate whether government chooses to address these …

POLS 406. Analyzing Policy Problems (3)

Prerequisite: POLS 372. Policymakers and advocates often use predictions of future policy outcomes and societal trends to identify issues government should address. This course serves as an introduction to the fundamental skills of policy analysis and to the difficult choices governments make when identifying, analyzing, and addressing policy problems. Students will develop a conceptual and …

POLS 407. Policy Implementation and Program Evaluation (3)

Prerequisite: POLS 372. Overview of policy implementation and program evaluation by looking at the strategies, techniques and tools used most frequently by policy makers and evaluators. Students are introduced to the major theories and applications so as to be able to use the techniques of evaluation to assess projects and programs in terms of impact, …

POLS 410. Advanced Comparative Politics (3)

Recommended Preparatory: POLS 156. An advanced study of comparative politics. This course focuses on major theoretical frameworks, concepts and approaches in the field. Key concepts covered include the state, democratization, modernization, political culture, social movements and underdevelopment. The course is designed to help students investigate world phenomena systematically and theoretically. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 411. Greek, Roman, and Medieval Political Theory (3)

Analysis of the major political theories and ideologies from the sophists, Plato and Aristotle through the epicureans, cynics, stoics, Cicero, St. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas.

POLS 412. Modern Western Political Theory (3)

Analysis of the major political theories and ideologies from Machiavelli and the Renaissance through Hobbes, Locke, the Enlightenment, Rousseau, Burke and Marx. Regular written assignments required.

POLS 413. American Political Thought (3)

American political ideologies from the colonial period through the Revolution and the period of the Constitution to the end of the 19th century.

POLS 414. Western Political Theory in the 20th Century (3)

Study of major contemporary theories in Western Europe and the U.S. Included are such theorists as Sarte, Camus, Easton, Lasswell, Dewey, McLuhan, Marcuse and Fanon, among other existentialists, behavioralists, Marxists and structuralists.

POLS 420A-H. International Relations of Selected Areas (3)

Intensive study of the international relations and impact on the world of nations or areas of special interest that are not included in other courses. Available for graduate credit. Course Title POLS 420A Latin America POLS 420C Eastern Europe POLS 420D Middle East POLS 420H Northeast Asia

POLS 421. The Politics of Development (3)

Examination and critical analysis of the problems, both internal and international, of countries that are undergoing political and economic modernization. Specific issue areas covered include human rights, the global economy, women in the global workplace, poverty and world hunger, environmental degradation and militarism. Selected countries are studied to determine historical trends in specific issue areas. …

POLS 422. International Politics (3)

Advanced study of international politics from the standpoint of theories of international politics, individual, group and state behavior; the relation between continuity, conflict and change in the international order; and an extensive examination of the paths and obstacles to world peace. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 423. Security Studies (3)

An analysis of security issues as they affect the nation-state. The course explores the actors, institutions and decision-making processes involved in the historical and contemporary development of defense policy. Various theoretical models will be utilized to assess issues of bargaining, mediation, war prevention and grand strategy doctrines. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 426. International Law (3)

Case studies of legal precedents affecting the regulation of the international community, together with an evaluation of the efficacy of international judicial sanctions. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 427A/L. Model United Nations and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: POLS 427AL. Begins with a general analysis of the role of the U.N. in world politics and comparative foreign policy. Particular emphasis is then placed on the foreign policy of the country to be represented and the internal and external factors on which that policy is based. Seminar format with group …

POLS 428. International Organization (3)

Analysis of the roles of various types of international organizations in contemporary world politics. Focus is on the United Nations, specialized (functional) agencies, regional organizations and non-governmental organizations such as multinational corporations, foundations and other “transnationals.” Available for graduate credit.

POLS 429. United States Foreign Policy (3)

Analysis of the contemporary declaratory and action policies pursued by the U.S. in the conduct of its foreign relations. Various conceptual models such as ends/means analysis, decision making and economic determinist are tested and evaluated in terms of their descriptive, analytical and predictive utility. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 432A. Politics of Mexico (3)

Prerequisite: POLS 156 or POLS 225 or instructor’s permission. Study of the genesis and development of Mexico’s political system. Examines the different interpretations of the Mexican political system and provides the background of the development of the modern Mexican state. Special emphasis in the challenges of contemporary Mexican politics, including the rising participation of civil …

POLS 433A. The Politics of Central America (3)

Study of the politics of Central America emphasizing current socioeconomic and political crises and U.S. involvement in those crises. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 435A. Government and Politics of China (3)

Analysis of the Peoples Republic of China, including its ideology, revolutionary origin, party organization, central and local government, role of the military, mass participation, economic modernization, cultural policies and foreign policy. Changes from the Maoist to the post-Mao period will be emphasized. The question of Taiwan will be discussed. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 436A. Government and Politics of Europe (3)

Comparative analysis of recent and contemporary European politics, focusing on the political, economic and social structures that have shaped European affairs since the end of World War II. Emphasis on the role played by the modern state, the interstate system, nationalism and the world economy in shaping postwar European politics. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 438. Governments and Politics of the Middle East (3)

Study of contemporary social and political movements, governmental institutions and politics of the Arab states, Israel and Iran. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 439A. Government and Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)

Study of the national governments, emerging political patterns and problems of new states of West and East Africa. Study includes an overview of traditional societies and the politics of cultural sub-nationalism. Major focus on contemporary nationalism, modernization and ideological developments, and on single-party, military and other political structures. Seminar format with individual presentations. Available for graduate …

POLS 440. American Political Parties and Politics (3)

Study of the rise of American political parties, their structure, operation, control and political leadership. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 441. Interest Groups (3)

Study of the tactics and aims of interest groups in their efforts to mold public opinion and to influence legislators, executives, judges and administrators. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 441A. Latina/o Politics (3)

This course examines how Latina/os engage the U.S. political system both at the elite and the mass level. It will also examine how political science understands both intra- and inter-group politics in the context of the evolving power of Latina/os in the United States. Students will explore politicized group identity and formation, political incorporation, political …

POLS 443. Congress and The Legislative Process (3)

This course covers the historical origins, development, and contemporary politics of the United States Congress and, to some extent, other American legislatures (state and local). The course examines the tension between Congress’ representational and policymaking functions, the details of the lawmaking process, and the way in which the Congress interacts with other political institutions. Students …

POLS 444. Elections and Voting Behavior (3)

Study of the electoral process in the U.S., presented in terms of the history of elections, election and campaign techniques, and patterns of voting behavior. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 445. Political Behavior (3)

Introduction to political behavior; the influences of culture, ideology and social structure on political life; group influences on political behavior and major factors in leadership; and psychological bases of participation in normal and extreme politics. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 446. The Presidency (3)

The course will cover the historical origins, development, and contemporary politics of the American presidency. The course will examine the president’s place in the American constitutional framework, the historical development of the presidency, and the development of the presidential selection system. Students will learn about sources of presidential power, explanations for variation in presidential power, …

POLS 447A. Media and Politics (3)

The focus of this course is a reconciliation of common perceptions of media influence on public opinion, elections and policy making with empirical evidence of media effects on these components of the political system. The term “media” will be defined through its organization and workings that includes print, broadcast and Internet sources. Students will learn …

POLS 448. Women and Politics in the United States and the World (3)

Examines feminist theories and public policies as they shape the various political possibilities and strategies for women in the U.S. and in other selected countries. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 449DC. DC Politics, Culture, and History (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to and satisfactory standing in the CSUN in DC Internship Program. Students will learn about the politics, history and culture of Washington, D.C. by living in and experiencing the city through activities, walking tours and attendance at events throughout the city. Among potential activities, students will visit museums, participate in walking tours, attend …

POLS 449PR. Professional Development in DC (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to and satisfactory standing in the CSUN in DC Internship Program. This course is meant to expose students to professional development and careers in Washington, D.C. The class will feature a series of speakers including professionals who work on Capitol Hill, in agencies, for nonprofits, and with advocacy organizations. Students will also work …

POLS 450. Jurisprudence (3)

Critical survey of the modern schools of jurisprudence and their treatment of law and such legal concepts and problems as obligation, responsibility, punishment and the limits and purposes of law. The works of students of jurisprudence or legal philosophy are supplemented with descriptive accounts of the nature and operation of modern legal systems. Available for graduate …

POLS 455. Criminal Procedures (3)

Critical examination of the law and practices of the criminal process. Emphasis on the major problems involved in pretrial procedures. These include search and seizure, self-incrimination, bail, plea bargaining and the enforcement of constitutional rights. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 457A. Constitutional Law I (3)

General principles of federal and state constitutional law, the powers of the national government and federal-state relations. Study of the leading decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 457B. Constitutional Law II (3)

Limitations on the national government and the scope of constitutional rights and liberties. Study of the leading decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 461. Environmental Policy (3)

Study and evaluation of the political process governing the making of environmental policy. Specific issues covered include energy policy, land use, air and water pollution, and hazardous and toxic waste disposal. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 462. Ethics in Politics and Administration (3)

Examination of the various kinds of ethical problems faced by elected and non-elected government personnel. Focus is on the scope and limits of individual responsibility in the practice of politics and the management of public organizations. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 464. Comparative Public Policy (3)

Examines why different nations formulate and implement different public policies for similar problems. Systematic and critical approach to understanding the effect of ideological orientations, political institutions and governmental processes on the public policies of modern states. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 465. Administrative Behavior (3)

Analysis of classic theories and case studies in administrative behavior; relations of organizational structure and personality types; and survey of approaches to rationality in decision making through study of the factors influencing administrative choices. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 466. The Politics of Public Spending (3)

Critical analysis of how government financial policies are formulated and controlled within a setting of conflicting views and interests. Examines the influence of the system of checks and balances: the effects of cooperation between chief executives, administrators, budget bureaus, legislators, pressure groups and the general public; and the impact of government spending on the private …

POLS 467. Urban Administration (3)

Analysis of public executives, including mayors, city managers and chief administrative officers, and their relationships to the structures of urban government and the public priorities and programs of urban areas. Focus includes the executive’s relationships with the formal structures, councils, civil servants, budgets, political parties, interest groups, independent agencies, the media and other levels of …

POLS 471A-F. Proseminar (3)

Prerequisites: POLS 372; Intended for seniors only (juniors require instructor consent). Advanced research in a subfield in political science. Available for graduate credit. Course Title POLS 471A American Government POLS 471B Comparative Government POLS 471C International Relations POLS 471D Political Theory POLS 471E Public Administration and Pubic Policy POLS 471F Public Law

POLS 480. The Politics of Globalization (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Introduction to some of the major changes that have accompanied the processes of globalization during the last 30 years, including identifying and addressing the positive and negative consequences of these changes. Discussion of different approaches to globalization; its technical and historical roots; and the economic, political, ethical and cultural consequences of …

POLS 481. Globalization, Gender and Democratization (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Concerned with three major phenomena of the modern world—globalization, democratization and feminization, as well as their interrelationships and their impacts on gender regimes (or gender relationships) in various parts of the world. Incorporates gender analysis into a critical study of the processes of globalization and democratization. Identifies a number of gender regimes …

POLS 490CA. Supervised Individual Project—California Government (1)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Individual, supervised studies in California government.(Available for General Education, D4 California State and Local Government.)

POLS 494I/A. Political Science Internship (1/2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: POLS 494IA. Approximately 120 hours of supervised fieldwork required. Students complete learning contracts and submit written reports related to their internships. Students will meet as a seminar group with a faculty member during the semester. Available for graduate credit. (Credit/No Credit only)

POLS 494J/A. Judicial Internship (1/2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite POLS 494JA. Students are assigned to a Superior Court judge to observe the inner workings of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Through observation of trials, settlement conferences, plea bargains and preliminary hearings, students develop a familiarity with the processes of the judicial system and the issues facing the legal system. Available …

POLS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Political Science (3)

Selected topics in political science, with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

POLS 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Does not carry credit for the master’s degree.

POLS 522A-G. Seminar in International Relations (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status or instructor consent. Inquiry into major contemporary theories in international relations, including treatment of the problems of theory building and testing. Course Title POLS 522A Theory and Methodology POLS 522C International Organizations POLS 522D Comparative Foreign Policies POLS 522F International Relations of Selected Areas POLS 522G Selected Topics

POLS 530A-J. Seminar in Comparative Government (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status or instructor consent. Inquiry into major contemporary theories in comparative government relations, including treatment of the problems of theory and the study of selected areas. Course Title POLS 530A Democratization POLS 530D Western Europe POLS 530H Latin America POLS 530J Selected Areas

POLS 540B-J. Seminar in American Government and Politics (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status or instructor consent. Inquiry into major contemporary theories in American government including treatment of the problems of theory, law, institutions and political behavior. Course Title POLS 540B Behavior POLS 540E Institutions POLS 540F Policy POLS 540G State and Local Government POLS 540H Municipal Government POLS 540J Selected Topics

POLS 570. Seminar in Political Theory (3)

Prerequisites: Open to graduate students in the social and behavioral sciences; Instructor consent for upper division students. Graduate survey seminar course in political theory. Engages students in in-depth analysis of the arguments of some of the defining figures of political theory, both ancient and contemporary.

POLS 571. Seminar in Methodology (3)

Study of representative literature in the field of political science, with emphasis on the underlying methodological assumptions, analysis of statistical techniques employed with respect to appropriateness, evaluation of research design and application, and evaluation of validity of conclusion, with recommendations for replication or improvement.

POLS 597. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Open by special permission to students electing to complete a comprehensive examination in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree.

POLS 599C. Independent Study (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

POLS 698D. Graduate Culminating Project (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. This culminating course requires students to demonstrate their mastery of their specialization in political science. Students will revise an existing research paper that they produced in one of their graduate seminars in political science and develop it into a manuscript that could be submitted as a conference paper, journal article, or academic writing …

PSY 150. Introduction to Psychology (3)

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. The content focuses on the exploration of major theories and concepts, methods, and research findings in psychology. Topics include the biological bases of behavior, ethics involved in research, perception, cognition, learning, memory, emotion, motivation, development, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders and therapeutic approaches, and applied …

PSY 230. Introduction to Human Sexual Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150, PSY 150 or SOC 150. Introductory overview of human sexual function and sexual behavior. Emphasis on the historical and religious background of the prevailing attitudes toward sex in our culture as well as to current sexual practices from the perspective of contemporary social science. Additional topics include sexual values and ethics, love, legal …

PSY 250. Physiological Correlates Human Behavior (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Passing grade in AAS, AFRS, CHS, or ENGL 098 or eligibility for the lower division writing requirement. Designed for students majoring in Psychology. Development of a greater understanding of the relationship between human behavior and human physiology. Includes basic information about the anatomy and function of the nervous and endocrine systems. Students …

PSY 301. Pre-Professional Development in Psychology (1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Course is required for Psychology majors. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 150. This course, required of all Psychology majors, should be taken as early as possible after declaring Psychology as one’s major. Students will learn about career options for Psychology majors, preparation for various post-B.A. career options and preparation …

PSY 310. Abnormal Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Survey of mental disorders, including biological, psychological and social/cultural determinants, as well as psychosocial and pharmacological interventions. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Psychology Cluster requirement for Psychology majors.

PSY 312. Psychological Aspects of Parenthood (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Analysis of motivations and skills necessary for parenthood and the effect of various parental attitudes and practices on the development of the self. Historical presentation of changes in parenting styles, cross-cultural views of parental practices and current information on the results …

PSY 313. Developmental Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. In the context of examining the development of the whole child, relevant aspects of physical, social, cognitive, linguistic and emotional change are highlighted as part of development from birth to adolescence. Emphasis …

PSY 320/L. Statistical Methods in Psychological Research and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; “C” or better in MATH 140 or equivalent. Corequisite: PSY 320L. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Analysis of statistical decision-making procedures used in psychological research. Lab: Considers problem-solving techniques and computational methods needed to analyze data obtained in psychological experiments. 3 hours lecture-discussion, 2 hours lab per week.

PSY 321/L. Research Methods in Psychology and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: PSY 320/L; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: PSY 321L. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Study of principles and techniques used to design and evaluate psychological research using simple and advanced research designs. Lab: Includes use of various research methods in psychology research projects. 3 hours lecture-discussion, 3 hours lab per week.

PSY 327. Infancy and Early Childhood (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150 or CADV 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Relevant aspects of physical, social, cognitive and emotional change are highlighted as part of human development from conception to early childhood (8 years). Emphasis on study of the underlying …

PSY 335. Middle Childhood (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150 or CADV 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. This course examines developmental changes in the middle childhood years (7-12 years). Emphasis is on current research and major theories associated with middle childhood development. Cultural contexts of development, …

PSY 345. Social Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Survey of phenomena that affect individual behavior. Topics include attitudes, affiliation, aggression, altruism, person perception, liking, social interaction, social influence and group dynamics. This course fulfills the 300-level Social Psychology Cluster requirement …

PSY 351. Behavioral Psychology and Therapy (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. The focus of this course is on how we learn certain behaviors, why we behave as we do and how human behavior can be modified. Topics include basic concepts, research …

PSY 352. Motivation (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Explores basic and acquired motivations that provide the energy to arouse and direct the individuals interactions with society. Discusses research methods in the social sciences. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.) (IC)

PSY 356. Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. An introduction to the major applications of psychology in various organizational and job settings. Representative topics include job selection and training, job enrichment, motivation, team collaboration, leadership, knowledge sharing, environmental design, consumer psychology, psychometrics, social networking and human factors. Consideration is given to individual student work interests and …

PSY 361. Adolescence (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150 or CADV 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Analysis of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes from puberty to adulthood. Examines contemporary youth culture from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. Discusses evaluation of age norms and …

PSY 365. Introduction to Gerontology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Study of the changes occurring with age as a result of alterations in physical conditions, economic status, role changes, etc. and the accompanying psychological effects. Students may engage in volunteer activities or …

PSY 367. Cognitive Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Analysis of the mechanisms by which people gather and process information from the environment. Basic phenomena of perception and cognition are discussed with an emphasis on experimental studies on such topics as …

PSY 369. Applied Cognition (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Cognitive psychology is the study of mental processes, such as learning, memory, attention, problem solving and language. Applied cognitive psychology describes contemporary cognitive theory from the perspective of its application in support …

PSY 380. Psychology of Stress (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Prerequisite/Corequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Cognitive, emotional and physiological effects of psychosocial stressors. Emphasis placed on differentiating stress from other motivational constructs and examining contemporary research approaches and techniques of personal stress management. This …

PSY 382. Principles of Human Factors (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite/Prerequisite for Psychology majors only: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of PSY 301. Overview of the interdisciplinary field of human factors, a professional specialization that considers how best to accommodate human needs in real world systems. Focuses on cognitive, perceptual, behavioral and physiological principles as …

PSY 406. Developmental Psychopathology (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 313. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Study of disorders diagnosed in infancy, childhood or adolescence (e.g., autism, mental retardation, communication disorders) and the empirically validated interventions appropriate for each population. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. 3 hours lecture-discussion per week. This course serves in a series of courses that …

PSY 409. Advanced Sport Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Not available to students who have taken KIN 409. Recommended Preparatory: KIN 306 and/or PSY 150, PSY 301. Addresses the evolution of sport psychology as a science, including the psychological variables associated with successful performance in sport and physical-activity settings. Kinesiology majors receive upper division elective credit toward the Kinesiology degree in options that …

PSY 426. Contemporary Trends in Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Trends and issues in current psychological theories and systems.

PSY 427. Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 320/L. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Basic concepts of psychological measurement as applied to the construction, evaluation and use of group and individual tests of intelligence, aptitude, interest and personality are studied. Demonstrations of the administration, scoring and interpretations of standardized tests are provided. Available for graduate credit.

PSY 442. Communication and Conflict Resolution (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Sharing of information and meanings in both verbal and nonverbal communication. Strategies of communication for active listening and sending of effective messages in many different contexts—couples, parent-child, group and workplace. Examines differences in communication style as a function of gender, age, social class, position of dominance, etc.

PSY 453. Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Offers a comprehensive and integrated approach to human sexuality. Examines sexual behaviors and attitudes in contemporary society, and includes the physiological basis of sexual function and dysfunction.

PSY 454. Clinical Psychology (4)

Prerequisite: PSY 310. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Survey of varied approaches to psychotherapy and examination of assessment methods used in research and decision making in clinical settings. Historical development of the field of clinical psychology and related disciplines, and such current professional issues as graduate programs, ethics and delivery of mental health services to the …

PSY 455. Ethical, Professional and Legal Standards in Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 150; Upper division or graduate status in Psychology. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Ethical issues relevant to teaching, research, and application of psychology are reviewed, with an emphasis on the principles of the American Psychological Association’s ethics code and related professional standards and guidelines. Available for graduate credit.

PSY 457. Behavioral Approaches to Autism Spectrum Disorder (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 351. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L. This course covers behavioral approaches to assessment and treatment of individuals with and families affected by autism spectrum disorders.

PSY 459/S. Methods of Behavior Analysis and Seminar (3/2)

Prerequisite: PSY 351; Corequisite: PSY 459S. This course examines the logic, procedures and various uses of behavioral science methodology. A variety of single subject research designs will be examined, with the strengths and weaknesses of each identified. Issues related to treatment fidelity, social validity and ethical use of behavioral methodology also will be discussed. Seminar: …

PSY 460. Counseling and Interviewing (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 310. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Intensive study of current approaches to individual counseling and psychotherapy, particularly for students seeking preparation for graduate programs. Format allows students to present research findings, discuss current theories and experience therapy situations through role play and supervised counseling.

PSY 471AA-ZZ. Advanced Inquiry in Clinical/Personality Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L; Any course from required Clinical Cluster (PSY 310, PSY 351, PSY 353, PSY 370 or PSY 380). Recommended Corequisite (when offered): Corresponding PSY 471AA-ZZ Seminar. For Psychology and Psychology Honors majors only. This course provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of clinical/personality psychology. Topics within …

PSY 471AAS-ZZS. Advanced Inquiry in Clinical/Personality Psychology Seminar (2)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L; Any course from required Clinical (PSY 310, PSY 351, PSY 353, PSY 370 or PSY 380). Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 471AA-ZZ Lecture. For Psychology and Psychology Honors majors only. This course is optional, but requires concurrent enrollment in lecture. It provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of clinical/personality psychology. Topics …

PSY 473AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Neuroscience and Seminar (3/2)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 473AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of neuroscience. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led …

PSY 475AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Developmental Psychology and Seminar (3/2)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L; Any course from required Developmental Cluster (PSY 313, PSY 327, PSY 335, PSY 361 or PSY 365). Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 475AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of developmental psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: …

PSY 479AA-ZZ. Advanced Inquiry in Social Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, PSY 345. Recommended Corequisite (when offered): Corresponding PSY 479AA-ZZ Seminar. This course provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of social psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters …

PSY 479AAS-ZZS. Advanced Inquiry in Social Psychology Seminar (2)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, PSY 345. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 479AA-ZZ Lecture. This course is optional, but requires concurrent enrollment in lecture. It provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of social psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from …

PSY 485AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Research and Analysis Methods and Seminar (3/2)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 485AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of research methods in psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, …

PSY 487H. Honors Psychology Proseminar (1)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L with a B+ or better. PSY 487H provides an advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of psychology. Topics will cover a survey of each of the sub-fields from the four main clusters of the major: clinical/personality psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and social psychology. By the end …

PSY 488AA-ZZ. Advanced Inquiry in Cognitive Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L; Any course from required Cognitive Cluster (PSY 304, PSY 367, PSY 369 or PSY 382). Recommended Corequisite (when offered): Corresponding PSY 488AA-ZZ Seminar. This course provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of cognitive psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Students …

PSY 488AAS-ZZS. Advanced Inquiry in Cognitive Psychology Seminar (2)

Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L; Any course from required Cognitive Cluster (PSY 304, PSY 367, PSY 369 or PSY 382). Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 488AA-ZZ Lecture. This course is optional, but requires concurrent enrollment in lecture. It provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of cognitive psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester.  Includes student presentation of …

PSY 492H. Honors Professional Development (1)

Prerequisite: Restricted. Instructor permission required. Recommended Preparation: PSY 301. Addresses issues associated with becoming a professional in Psychology. Discussion of time management, study skills, decisions about one’s prospective career, discussion of activities that can strengthen competitiveness for a variety of career goals, presenting at professional conferences, writing a statement of purpose, preparing a curriculum vita, among …

PSY 493SOC. Professional Development in the Social Sciences II (1)

Prerequisites: PSY 250, PSY 492H. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Students learn, in detail, what it is like to be in a graduate program. Prepares students to be successful while in their graduate program by preparing them to write applications for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals for work with human and animal subjects, writing for publication, …

PSY 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Psychology (1-4)

Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Experimental courses in psychology, with course content to be determined.

PSY 497C. Proseminar in Psychological Research (3-3)

Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. Introduction to psychological research and writing through supervised individual projects and fieldwork. 6 units maximum may be taken for credit.

PSY 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 301. 6 units maximum may be taken for credit.

PSY 500. Seminar in Professional Development (1-1)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor and will be graded using the same standards as for graduate students. Addresses issues associated with being in master’s programs in Psychology and being a professional in the social sciences. Students receive direct research experience and learn the skills needed …

PSY 512. Seminar in Developmental Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor. Undergraduate students will be graded using the same standards as for graduate students. Offers an examination of critical issues and theories in the study of human development. Discussion of selected topics in child and/or adolescent development, including empirical findings and …

PSY 524/L. Multivariate Analysis Computer and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: PSY 420/L. Corequisite: PSY 524L. Analysis of multivariate research data in psychology using packaged computer programs. Covers standard techniques with applications in psychology. Choice of analytic technique is discussed, as are methods of screening data to assure appropriateness of techniques. Lab: Provides direct experience with computing facilities for conducting multivariate analysis and computational methods …

PSY 525AA-ZZ. Advanced Psychological Measurement (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor permission. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 427. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor. Undergrads are graded using the same standards used for graduate students. This course focuses on the theory and practice of advanced psychological measurement as applied to the construction, evaluation and use of group and …

PSY 534/S. Latent Variable Analysis and Seminar (3/2)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. Corequisite: PSY 534S. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 420/L, PSY 524/L. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll with permission of the instructor and will be graded using the same standards as for graduate students. Introduction to path models and models hypothesized to be generated by latent (unmeasured) variables. Topics will include …

PSY 540. Seminar in Social Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor. Undergraduate students will be graded using the same standards as for graduate students. Examines current research and theory in social psychology. Representative topics include attitudes, aggression, altruism and helping, attraction and intimacy, applied social psychology, attribution, culture, conformity and obedience, …

PSY 550. Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis for Behavior Technicians (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology or Special Education and instructor consent. This course is an introduction to the principles of learning and how these principles relate to applied behavioral analytic interventions. Topics include an in-depth examination of operant and respondent conditioning, evidence-based practice, measurement, assessment, skill acquisition, behavior reduction, documentation and reporting, professional conduct, and …

PSY 551A. Becoming a BCBA: Professional and Certification Issues (1)

This course will introduce students to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board, which has developed eligibility standards to take the BACB Certification Examinations, Renewal and Recertification Standards to maintain certification, Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts, Professional Disciplinary Standards with appeal procedures, procedures to approve continuing education providers, and professionally developed and maintained certification examinations.

PSY 552. Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (3)

This course is an introduction to basic characteristics, processes, concepts and terminology in applied behavior analysis (ABA) and the learning principles on which ABA is based. Topics include philosophy and assumptions of ABA, choosing and defining target behaviors, positive and negative reinforcement, schedules of reinforcement, extinction, positive and negative punishment, imitation, motivating operations, functional relations, …

PSY 553. Measurement and Experimental Evaluation of Behavior (3)

In this course, students will learn how to design and evaluate experimental interventions, as well as measure, display and interpret results of experimental behavioral interventions. Ethical considerations in the use of behavioral interventions also will be discussed. This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Behavior …

PSY 555. Assessment in Applied Behavior Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology; instructor consent. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll with instructors permission. This course focuses on ethical issues and the primary methods used for behavioral assessment in application of behavior analysis Students learn to interpret and conduct preference assessments, reinforcer assessments, indirect and descriptive assessments, and functional analyses. Various methods used to …

PSY 557. Behavior Change Procedures and Systems Support (3)

This course will focus on procedures for behavioral analysts working with students with learning, behavioral, emotional and/or peer relationship problems. Topics include using reinforcement, punishment, extinction, prompting, shaping, chaining, incidental teaching techniques, direct and precision teaching, discrete trials, contingency contracts, token economy, and providing behavior analysis services in collaboration with others. Students also learn to …

PSY 558. Topics in Behavior Analysis (3)

In this course, students will learn applications of behavior analytic theories, procedures and methods as it pertains to special populations (e.g., children with autism, geriatrics, learners with developmental disabilities). Specific behavioral challenges and research in the selected topics will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on evidence-based practices and procedures to eliminate or minimize challenges, …

PSY 581. Teaching of Psychology (3-3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course focuses on the theories, skills, preparation and practices required for serving as an instructional aide in Psychology courses. Topics include course preparation, skills for fostering student learning, theories of assessment, effective strategies for improving student writing, using technology in the classroom, diversity, sensitivity and treatment of special populations, as well …

PSY 591A. Seminar in Cognitive Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor and will be graded using the same standards as for graduate students. Offers an in-depth examination of current research and theory in cognition. Representative topics include attention, perception, learning, memory, language, problem solving, creativity, reasoning, decision making and intelligence.

PSY 594A-Z. Tutorial in Psychology (1-4)

Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program or instructor consent. Tutorial content varies by instructor and related areas of faculty specialty. Sections meet in small groups for reading and discussion to cover topics such as cognition, social psychology, traumatic stress, mental disorders and substance dependence, clinical neuropsychology and human factors design. May be repeated for credit.

PSY 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Psychology (1-4)

Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program or instructor consent. Advanced examination of selected studies in psychology with course content to be determined. Topics are presented from a psychological perspective encompassing theory, contemporary research, and intervention alternatives. Course content varies by instructor and related areas of faculty specialty. Courses include such topics as cognition, social psychology, …

PSY 600. Ethical Practice with Individuals, Families, and Multidisciplinary Teams (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. This course focuses on ethical and professional research and practice of behavior analysts and professionals in the field of psychology. Emphasis is placed on ethical guidelines established by Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) and American Psychological Association (APA) through analyzing cases that address working with individuals, families and …

PSY 610A, B. Advanced Psychopathology (3, 3)

Prerequisite: PSY 310. State-of-the-science review of the principal methods for assessing psychopathology in children and adults. Discussion of the empirical and theoretical basis of the current DSM. PSY 610A covers child and adolescent psychopathology, while PSY 610B covers adolescent, adult and geriatric populations. Both courses include key issues in retrospective assessment, family history and cultural …

PSY 611. Developmental Psychopathology and ABA Interventions (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. This course focuses on psychopathology and applied behavior analytic (ABA) interventions across human development. Emphasis is placed on psycholopathology and empirically validated interventions to address the behavioral excesses and deficits of each disorder. This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the …

PSY 612. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 313 or equivalent; Classified graduate status. Examination of current approaches to critical issues and theories relevant to an understanding of developmental processes. Discusses applications of results of these current approaches for psychological service to children.

PSY 620. Advanced Psychopathology (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 310. Recommended Preparatory: Admission to a master’s-level graduate program in Psychology. Advanced description of psychopathology in children and adults including mental disorders identified in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Examination of the biological, psychological and social/cultural determinants of mental disorders, as well as the empirically validated psychosocial …

PSY 624/L. Advanced Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)

Corequisite: PSY 624L. Recommended Preparatory: PSY 310, PSY 427. Practical implementation of psychological assessment tools including cognitive, academic, emotional, social, psychological and behavioral measures used in human assessment. Students will learn how to administer and score a range of standardized instruments and how these measures are interpreted and reported to stakeholders.

PSY 625C/L. Child/Adolescent Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to a master’s-level graduate program in Psychology (Clinical, General Experimental or Human Factors). Corequisites: PSY 427, PSY 625CL. Theory and practice of individual assessment of intelligence and personality in non-clinical children and adolescents, as well as those referred for diagnostic assessment of attention, cognitive, learning and/or social-emotional adjustment issues. Supervised practice in test …

PSY 625D/L. Adult Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: PSY 427; Admission to a master’s-level graduate program in Psychology (Clinical, General Experimental or Human Factors). Corequisite: PSY 625DL. Theory and practice of individual assessment of intelligence and personality in non-clinical adults and with those referred for diagnostic assessment of attention, cognitive, learning, and/or social-emotional adjustment issues. Supervised practice in test administration, evaluation, integration …

PSY 628. Fundamentals of Psychotherapy (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 460; Instructor consent. Comprehensive review of representative theories of psychotherapy and behavioral readjustment with an evaluation of the assumptions underlying these theories. Emphasis on group work in a community mental health setting. (Some sections are reserved exclusively for M.A. students in the classified graduate programs.)

PSY 629. Philosophy and Concepts of Behavior Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. This course focuses on advanced understanding of the philosophy, theories, science, and concepts of applied behavior analysis. Students will demonstrate competence in the history and philosophy of behaviorism, theoretical approaches to understanding behavior, and interpretation of behavior in terms of the concepts and principles of behavior analysis. This …

PSY 640. Advanced Social Psychology I (3)

Extensive coverage of major research and theories advanced in contemporary social psychology, with emphasis on individual behavior as a function of social variables. Topics include interpersonal attraction, person perception and attributional processes, attitude formation and change, social motivation, aggression and altruism.

PSY 650. Organizational Behavior Management (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. Students will learn how the principles of behavior are applied in organizational settings to assess and change behavior of individuals working together to achieve common goals. Students will be introduced to evidence-based performance management at the systems and individual case levels and evidence-based staff training and supervision practices. …

PSY 655A-Z. Fieldwork in Psychological Services (1-5)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Taught as an academic, University-based experience designed to accompany students supervised practica, fieldwork and/or internship. Course content varies as a function of the practicum setting (e.g., hospital, community agency) and client age level (e.g., children, adolescents, adults). May be repeated (up to four semesters) and taken for varying number of units (1-5).

PSY 660. Seminar in Counseling (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 460; Instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: PSY 660T. Some sections are reserved exclusively for M.A. degree students in classified graduate programs. Examination of current theoretical approaches to counseling with emphasis on applications to individual and group, children, adolescents and families.

PSY 690A. Advanced Sensation and Perception (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status; Instructor consent. Critical review of current literature, theories, methods and problems concerning sensory and perceptual processes.

PSY 692A. Seminar in Research Methodology (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. This course focuses on advanced research methods in psychology, including review of the scientific approach, research designs and measurement, and threats to validity. Emphasis is on critical analysis of research in terms of the research objective, the adequacy of research design and the justifications for the conclusions.

PSY 696. Directed Clinical Research (3-3)

May be repeated once for credit.

PSY 697ABA. Directed Comprehensive Studies/Exams (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology; Instructor consent. This course is the culminating experience in the Master of Science program in Applied Behavior Analysis. Directed Comprehensive Studies includes two parts: oral comprehensive examinations and written comprehensive examinations. (Credit/No Credit only)

PSY 697C. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Directed Comprehensive Studies

PSY 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status; Instructor consent. Course may be repeated once.

PSY 698D. Graduate Culminating Project (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology; instructor permission required. In this culminating graduate course, students demonstrate their mastery of the behavior analytic skills necessary to become competent Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs). Students will be expected to apply the knowledge and experiences they gained in their prior behavioral clinical graduate coursework to new cases. Students will …

PSY 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: Written proposals for independent study in areas of special interest to the advanced student must be submitted for departmental approval prior to registration.

SBS 320. Social Science Research Methods (3)

Study of principles and techniques used to design and evaluate social scientific research. Course includes discussion of data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation.

SOC 150. Introductory Sociology (3)

Study of human society from the perspective of contemporary social science. Particular emphasis on analysis and understanding of modern society and its salient problems. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

SOC 200. Social Crises of Today (3)

Helps the student understand the bases of some of the major social crises of the present day. Topics include alcoholism, delinquency and street crime, ethnic tensions, gambling, international tensions, organized crime, political corruption and terrorism. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

SOC 202. Sociological Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Discussion of the logic and procedures of scientific analysis of social phenomena. Practice in conceptualizing and operationalizing social variables, and in formulating testable hypotheses. Examination of the role of quantitative techniques and data reduction in current sociological analysis.

SOC 230. Introduction to Human Sexual Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: ANTH 150, PSY 150 or SOC 150. Introductory overview of human sexual function and sexual behavior. Emphasis on the historical and religious backgrounds of the prevailing attitudes toward sex in our culture, as well as to current sexual practices from the perspective of contemporary social science. Additional topics include sexual values and ethics, love, legal …

SOC 303. The Family (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Family as a social institution on the basis of the data of ethnology, history and contemporary studies. Special attention to contemporary culture patterns.

SOC 304. Sociology of Deviance (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102. Deviant behavior in contemporary American society. Various definitions of deviance and social responses to the phenomenon. Theories of structural conditions and personal motivations contributing to different life styles. Analysis of deviant subcultures and individual case studies.

SOC 305. Culture and Personality (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: ANTH 150, PSY 150 or SOC 150. Cross-cultural study of the development of individual personality in the sociocultural milieu. Special attention is given to child-rearing practices, social personality, social character, mental health and illness, and conforming and deviant behavior in several Western and non-Western societies. Not to …

SOC 306. Sociology of Jewish Families and Communities (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: SOC 150. This course uses the perspectives and tools of sociology to explore how different cultural and social structures affect Jewish families and communities throughout the Jewish diaspora. (Cross-listed with JS 306.) (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

SOC 307. Ethnic Diversity in America (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: SOC 150. Description and analysis of contemporary, changing ethnic cultures and lifestyles in American society. Focused analysis of ethnic cultures/lifestyles by social class, family form, sex role and orientation, age-grouping and influences of social movements and popular culture. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

SOC 324. Sociology of Sex and Gender (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: SOC 150. Analysis of contemporary and historical sex roles in major societal institutions, including economic, political, educational, legal and medical systems, and institutions of marriage and family. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

SOC 325. Sex Roles and Work (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Examination of current research on women in the labor force in U.S. and other industrial societies, including the impact of affirmative action programs, changes in structure and function of industrial labor forces, and projections of future roles of women and men in the labor force.

SOC 332. People, Society, and Culture in the Middle East (3)

Recommended Preparatory: SOC 150. A sociological analysis of diverse Middle Eastern cultures and social structures. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course examines the role of religion, the modern state, nationalism, ideologies, social classes, industrialization, modernization, and the impact of the West on the Middle Eastern cultures and societies.

SOC 335. Jewish Identity in the U.S. (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: SOC 150. This course is a social-scientific study of American Jewish religious and ethnic identity. It focuses on the social institutions and processes involved in Jewish identity, and compares the experience of Jews with other religious, ethnic, and cultural groups in the U.S. (Cross-listed with JS 335.) …

SOC 340. Sociology of Work (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Analysis of the structural context of work in contemporary society, including preparation for access to different positions within the occupational structure. Study of work settings, including formal and informal characteristics, changes in the structure of work and case histories involving work experiences and occupational subcultures.

SOC 345. Social Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Study of the group-setting of the individual, theories, concepts, principles and their application. History of the field as an interdisciplinary specialty. Current research and trends.

SOC 348. Juvenile Delinquency (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102. Extent and distribution of delinquency, with emphasis on the local area. Meaning, implications and treatment of delinquency. Individual-level and social environmental theoretical explanations.

SOC 350. Population Dynamics (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Analysis of the nature, causes and consequences of major world population trends as they are related to urban studies, medical sociology and ecology. Studies fertility, mortality and migration; sex ratios; race and ethnic composition; marital, educational and occupational status; and census and vital statistics.

SOC 355. Criminology (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102. Nature of crime, causal factors of criminal behavior and group control of the crime problem.

SOC 356. Social Welfare Institutions (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Exploration of social welfare institutions as one of the basic institutions in contemporary society. Examines varied political and social ideologies that contribute to the development of social welfare institutions, programs, and policies.

SOC 357. Anti-Oppressive Social Work Practice (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Introduction to social work and social justice practice from an anti-oppressive perspective. Application of critical social work theories and anti-oppressive approaches in social work/social justice from micro through macro practice with emphasis placed on intersecting issues of privilege and oppression. Requires 40 volunteer field hours in approved community organization.

SOC 370. Political Sociology (3)

Lecture-discussion of the social and cultural bases of political ideologies and processes. Study of power and its varying relationships to decision making at community and national levels. Analyses of the roles, structure and interaction of voluntary and political organizations in the political system, including conflict and its resolution. Sociological interpretations of contemporary American political behavior.

SOC 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Sociology (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Selected topics in sociology, with course content to be determined.

SOC 400. Organizational Theory (3)

Study of contemporary sociological theories of organizational dynamics and behavior. Analysis of the social structural and interactional dynamics of organizational settings. Includes supervised individual or group projects and reports. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 401. Class, Status and Power (3)

Analysis of the distribution of wealth, prestige and power. Study of the causes of poverty, life chances of the poor, lifestyles of the wealthy, upward and downward mobility, and class and group conflict in society. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 410. Urban Sociology (3)

Worldwide processes of urbanization, both historical and contemporary. Theoretical approaches and research and their implications for urban policy and change. Focuses on social structure, social differentiation and lifestyles found within a metropolitan area and in diverse metropolitan areas and their implications. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 411. Sociology of Education (3)

Sociological analysis of education as an institution of socialization, including relevant theories, its structure, the challenges of diversity, the complexities of the urban/suburban school setting and current professional issues. Focuses on how issues of diversity impact the institution at the macro level, as well as the experiences of administrators, teachers, students, families and communities. Available …

SOC 420CSL. Mentoring to Overcome Struggles and Inspire Courage (MOSAIC) (3)

The course will include the sociological examination of the issues facing at-risk youth in their personal relationships and in their school and community environments. In doing so, students explore how sociological concepts and theories apply in “real-world” situations. Furthermore, student mentors are paired with youth in the community who have been identified as at risk …

SOC 424/L. Statistical Techniques in Social Research and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: MATH 140. Recommended Preparatory: SOC 150. Corequisite: SOC 424L. The application and understanding of statistical techniques used in sociological research, related to univariate and multi-variate descriptions, as well as probability and hypothesis testing in statistical inference. Techniques include tabular and graphical presentations, central tendency and dispersion, cross-tabulation analysis, simple and multiple correlation, and regression …

SOC 426. Social Legislation and Social Policy (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the historical, social, and political aspects related to the development of social policies. Learn how to apply a practitioner policy analysis perspective to pertinent social welfare policies, including TANF, managed mental healthcare, Social Security, substance abuse policies, and child welfare policies. Regular written assignments required. Available …

SOC 430. Theory I – Classical Sociological Theory (4)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Discussion and analysis of classical sociological theories and theorists.

SOC 433. Sociology of Globalization (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. This course examines the sociological study of globalization with a focus on theories and debates about the economic, geopolitical, and cultural processes that have led to increased global connectivity. Topics to be addressed include: the shift from a developmental to global economy, culture and globalization, migration and family structures, global identity formations, …

SOC 434. The Sociology of Law (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102. Introduction to the sociological study of law and the legal system, with emphasis on social analysis of criminal law and the courts. Specifically, the course addresses social perspectives on the origins of law and law-making, the application and enforcement of law, and the administration of justice through the legal process. Critical thinking …

SOC 440. Sociology of Aging (3)

Analysis of aging in its social and social-psychological aspects throughout the lifespan. Emphasis on particular social problems of the elderly, including retirement, widowhood, suicide, housing, income maintenance, attitudes toward death and dying and more. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 450. Medical Sociology (3)

Survey of sociological theory and research techniques related to mortality, illness and medical treatment. Emphasis on the epidemiological aspects of these phenomena in various groups, hospitals, community health settings and more. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 451. Sociological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 230. Emphasizes the sociological influences shaping human sexual behavior, with an emphasis on learning social scripts. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 452. Sociology of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Communities (3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Analysis of cross-cultural and historical treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer communities. Survey of sociological research on these communities, including an examination of theory and practice. Analysis of homophobia and other attitudes toward these communities. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 454. Policing Society (3)

Preparatory: CJS 102. Exposure to research and literature related to the study of policing. Explores the history of policing; selection, training and socialization of the police; police culture; female and minority officers; community policing; police deviance and ethics; police discretion; private policing; and hazards of policing. Looks at “classic” studies in addition to the most …

SOC 459. Child Welfare (3)

Trends in the movement toward establishing the rights of the child to protection and care. Emphasis on the child and the law, compulsory education, school social work, child labor legislation, institutional and foster care for the healthy and the sick child, and adoption legislation. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 461. Sociology of Immigration (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. This course provides a sociological understanding of contemporary migration both globally and with a particular focus on the U.S. Understanding the immigration process from a sociological perspective offers insight into why individuals and groups move, how they are received and incorporated into the host society, how migration is sustained over time, and …

SOC 467. Sociology of Religion (3)

Sociological theories of religious behavior from Max Weber to the present. Comparative study of the relationships between the role, ritual and belief systems of religious institutions and their social contexts. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 468. Theory II – Contemporary Sociological Theory (4)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. Discussion and analysis of contemporary sociological theories and theorists.

SOC 476. Social Movements (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 150. This course is an overview of the core sociological concepts and perspectives in the social movement literature. This course will examine the factors that lead people to participate in social movements and how social movement participation shapes people’s lives. The course will explore theoretical perspectives developed in the study of social movements …

SOC 482SOC. Practicum in Work and Society (3)

Supervised field experience in counseling and guidance activities, paraprofessional work settings. Community field placements consistent with student career needs. Class size limited to 15 students. An Academic Internship course. (Letter Grade only)

SOC 484. Progressive Community Organizing (3)

The course examines the history of community organizing in the United States; explores the different theories and approaches to effective grassroots organizing; and emphasizes the organizing skills necessary to empower people so they can improve their communities. The course intends to translate social work values into community level practice, with a focus on self-determination and …

SOC 490S/F. Supervised Field Seminar and Fieldwork (1/2)

Prerequisites: SOC 357 and overall GPA of 3.0. Corequisites: SOC 490F and SOC 490S are taken concurrently. Pre-enrollment by specific date during the preceding semester is required. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply social work theories to practice, to advocate for social justice, and to gain experience in an agency setting. The …

SOC 492. Human Behavior in the Social Environment (3)

This course presents students with a range of theories that seek to understand human behavior across the lifespan. It integrates biological, psychological, structural, environmental, political, global, and sociocultural perspectives. This course also explores the relationship between the person and the environment including families, groups, organizations, communities, and institutions. Available for graduate credit.

SOC 493. Diversity and Social Justice (3)

This course explores diversity, privilege and oppression on individual, social/cultural and institutional levels, based on the intersections of race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, (dis)ability status, and social class. Students will examine their own social identities, social group memberships and social roles along the lines of power, privilege, marginalization, and representation. An anti-oppressive …

SOC 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Sociology (1-4)

Special Seminar in selected topics in sociology, with course content to be determined.

SOC 497/L. Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: SOC 424/L. Corequisite: SOC 497L. Application of the scientific method to social phenomena, including both quantitative and qualitative methods of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data, as well as considerations about research design, the role of theory, and ethics. Methods covered may include survey research, experimental research, secondary data analysis, content analysis, focus groups, …

SOC 524. Gender and Society (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate class standing. Examination of the foundational and contemporary theories of the sociology of gender. Analysis of the ways in which gender structures individual identities, interpersonal relations, role expectations, and patterns of social inequality within institutions such as the family, education, and work. Topics covered include the social construction of gender, intersectionality, sexual identities, …

SOC 545. Seminar in Social Psychology (3)

Advanced investigation of the dynamics of social interaction. Interdisciplinary research.

SOC 572. Evaluation Research (3)

Examination and employment of approaches and methods used by professional evaluators in the public, nonprofit, and private sector to evaluate and assess programs and policies. Topics include the design of instruments for primary data collection, the identification of stakeholders, and the creation of logic models, program theories, and management plans.

SOC 585A-Z. Selected Topics in Sociology (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of core requirements in undergraduate program or equivalent; 12 units of 400- or 500-level courses in Sociology. Special seminars in selected topics in sociology.

SOC 601. Classical Sociological Theory (3)

Critical examination of significant theoretical formulations and trends in classical sociology.

SOC 670. Contemporary Sociological Theory (3)

Critical examination of significant theoretical formulations and trends in contemporary sociology.

SOC 680. Advanced Quantitative Methods (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 364. Selected topics from new and developing fields of quantitative sociological analysis.

SOC 685. Qualitative Research Methods (3)

The study of research methods sociologists use to gather, analyze and interpret qualitative data. Emphasis is placed on philosophical assumptions, interpretive frameworks and diverse approaches to qualitative inquiry such as interviews, content analysis, participant observation, ethnography and historical-comparative research. Topics covered include research ethics, positionality, reflexivity and validity.

SOC 690. Quantitative Research Methods (3)

The advanced study of research methods sociologists use to gather, analyze and interpret quantitative data. Topics covered include survey construction, experimental design and secondary data analysis. Emphasis is placed on descriptive and inferential statistical analyses.

SOC 691A. Advanced Social Research Techniques (3)

Development of graduate research projects providing training in specific research techniques. Course Title SOC 691A Observational Techniques

SOC 695C. Graduate Proseminar in Sociology (2)

Prerequisites: Admission to M.A. program in sociology. An introductory course designed for beginning graduate students. Fundamentals of the program, skills and knowledge needed for graduate level work, advanced library research skills, academic writing, professional socialization, and career and educational options with the master’s in sociology are addressed.

SOC 696A. Directed Graduate Research (3)

This course is designed to prepare students for the culminating experience in the master’s degree program in sociology. Students pursuing the thesis option are required to write and defend a thesis proposal and secure IRB approval (if required). Students pursing the comprehensive exam option are required to do an extensive review of the research in …

SOC 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (4)

Prerequisites: SOC 601, SOC 670, SOC 685, SOC 690. Limited to students preparing to take the comprehensive examination for the M.A. degree in Sociology. (Credit/No Credit only)

SOC 698. Thesis (4)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status; Instructor consent. Limited to students completing a thesis project for the M.A. degree in Sociology. (Credit/No Credit only)

SUS 500. Foundations of Sustainable Systems (3)

This course will teach the foundations of sustainability from a broad, systems-level approach. Topics include human impacts on the environment, ecological systems and natural resources; world views and carrying capacity; food and agriculture; energy, water and waste; transportation and the built environment; corporate social responsibility; and the psychology of change. Case studies and research are …

SUS 510. Resource Use and Management (3)

Recommended Preparatory Course: SUS 500. In this course, students will learn current and best practices for resource use, monitoring and management.  Discussions will focus on energy and water consumption and sources, waste and emissions. In the course we will evaluate alternative practices for use and supply of energy and water taking into account technical, environmental, …

SUS 520. Regulatory Framework for Sustainability (3)

Recommended Preparatory Course: SUS 500. This course examines the law and regulatory policy governing the operation of businesses and organizations and their impact on sustainability. Topics include an examination of sustainable business practices in light of international and U.S. federal and state law governing environmental policies and practices; implementation of law and policy to further …

SUS 530. Mixed Methods in Sustainability Research (3)

Prerequisites: SUS 500 and SUS 510. This course provides an overview of the methodologies utilized by practitioners of sustainability. These qualitative and quantitative methodologies are applied in multiple ways in a wide variety of government, business, nonprofit, NGO, and educational sectors. Thus, becoming familiar with these tools will further help students develop their own methodological …

SUS 540. Sustainable Business Practices (3)

Recommended Preparatory Course: SUS 500.  An interdisciplinary exploration of strategic issues in sustainability. Uses various frameworks such as systems thinking to analyze opportunities and threats sustainability creates for organizations. May include lectures, readings, case studies, computer simulations, experiential exercises, guest speakers, field trips, and student projects.

SUS 698. Thesis or Graduate Project (3-3)

Prerequisites: SUS 500, SUS 510, SUS 530; Graduate standing; Instructor permission required. This is the culminating experience for this graduate degree. By synthesizing and applying the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills gained in their prior graduate coursework, students will plan, prepare and complete a thesis or graduate project that creatively addresses a local, regional or global …

SWRK 501. Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate admission; Acceptance to the MSW program. This is the first of two human behavior and the social environment courses that provide understanding of human behavior and social environmental relationships from an ecological perspective. This course focuses on child development from pre-birth to maturity. Child development is a complex interplay between the emerging child and their …

SWRK 502. Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3)

Prerequisites: SWRK 501; Graduate admission; Acceptance to the MSW program. This is the second of two human behavior and the social environment courses that provide understanding of human behavior and social environmental relationships from an ecological perspective. It focuses on the developmental dynamics of larger social systems, specifically groups, organizations, and communities, and their influence on …

SWRK 503. Psychosocial Assessment and Diagnostic Formulation (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the MSW program. Social workers are often required to practice within multidisciplinary teams of professionals. This course teaches students to conduct a comprehensive psychosocial assessment of individuals and families which emphasizes anti-oppressive, socially just practice. Students critique assessment and diagnostic tools including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the …

SWRK 510. Generalist Social Work Theory and Practice I (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Acceptance to the MSW program. This introductory course is designed to provide students with an overview of the basic knowledge and skills essential to generalist social work practice. Attention is given to the diverse needs of multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and multi-national populations; the nature and application of social work values and ethical principles; the …

SWRK 520. Social Work Practice in Multicultural Contexts (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Acceptance to the MSW program. This course is designed to assist graduate social work students in understanding and applying a cultural humility, intersectionality-based lens in order to increase critical consciousness in micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice with local, national, and transnational communities. Students have the opportunity to critically examine and …

SWRK 521. Generalist Social Work Theory and Practice II (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Acceptance to the MSW program. This course is designed to help students understand systemic inner-workings of groups, communities, organizations, and institutions from a macro and social-justice lens. The course approaches these issues from an intersectional, collaborative, and strengths-based perspective. It provides an opportunity to examine selected macro models of practice, and learn …

SWRK 522/P. Generalist Field Education I and Placement (2/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the MSW program. Corequisite: SWRK 522P. Foundations of Field Education and Placement I and II are designed to empower the student to apply knowledge, skills, and ethics learned in social work coursework during their field practicum experience. The chief purpose of the first year of field (522/P in Fall and 523/P in Spring) …

SWRK 523/P. Generalist Field Education II and Placement (2/1)

Prerequisite: SWRK 522/P. Corequisite: SWRK 523P. Generalist Field Education and Placement I and II are designed to empower the students to apply knowledge, skills, and ethics learned in social work coursework during their field practicum experience. The chief purpose of the first year of fieldwork (522/P in Fall and 523/P in Spring) is to develop generalist …

SWRK 525. Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Acceptance to the MSW program. This course examines economic, historical, political, intellectual, sociocultural, ideological and other such factors shaping social welfare, economic policy, programs and services. The course uses various analytical frameworks for studying social welfare policy, programs, and services, with a focus on intersectionality, power, and privilege. The course examines the …

SWRK 535. Social Work Research Methods I (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Acceptance to the MSW program. This foundation course introduces students to research methods useful for social work practice, enabling students to become critical consumers of science-based information. Students are exposed to social work research through the lens of intersectionality, power, and privilege to promote the well-being of individuals, families, and communities in urban …

SWRK 601. Advanced Social Work Practice with Urban Families I (3)

Prerequisite: Second year standing; acceptance in the advanced year. This course emphasizes theories, concepts, and skills of social work practice with urban families. The central content of the course is the application of advanced practice skills to prepare professional social workers to be anti-oppressive, socially just agents of change who promote well-being by working with diverse …

SWRK 602. Advanced Social Work Practice with Urban Families II (3)

Prerequisites: SWRK 601; Second year standing. This course advances students’ generalist practice knowledge and skills as anti-oppressive, socially just agents of change who work with diverse urban communities. Utilizing a strengths-based, inclusive practice model and the person-in-environment perspective, students are taught engagement, assessment, intervention, practice evaluation, and termination skills. Evidence-based and shared-decision practice models are …

SWRK 621. Advanced Social Work Practice in Urban Communities (3)

Prerequisite: SWRK 521. Recommended Preparatory: First year (Generalist) courses. This course is designed to help students understand and apply mezzo/macro social work interventions in urban community settings that benefit families, groups, organizations and institutions. Building upon the material in SWRK 521, this advanced generalist course provides an opportunity to explore and apply selected advanced social work …

SWRK 622/P. Specialist Field Education with Urban Communities I and Placement (2/1)

Prerequisites: Second year standing, SWRK 523/P. Corequisite: SWRK 622P. Specialist Field Education I and II are the advanced concentration field practicum courses. In the advanced field practicum, students continue to build upon the knowledge and skills gained during the foundation year. The course provides field education related to the advanced concentration curriculum, which focuses on …

SWRK 623/P. Specialist Field Education with Urban Communities II and Placement (2/1)

Prerequisites: Second year standing; SWRK 622/P. Corequisite: SWRK 623P. Specialist Field Education I and II are the advanced concentration field practicum courses. In the specialized field practicum, students continue to build upon the knowledge and skills gained during the foundation year. The courses provide field education related to the advanced concentration curriculum, which focuses on social …

SWRK 630. Family Crisis, Trauma and Grief (3)

Prerequisite: Second year standing; acceptance in the advanced year. This course examines the complexities of trauma(s) experienced by individuals, families and communities in urban settings. Students examine the impact that various forms of trauma have on the developmental trajectory of individuals, families and communities. Students develop an understanding of trauma-informed care and its application to …

SWRK 635. Social Work Research Methods II (3)

Prerequisites: Second year standing; SWRK 535. This course advances students’ knowledge and application of research methods. Students will apply an intersectionality, power, and privilege lens to a range of social work research activities, including: (a) ethics in research and skills to prepare a human subjects protocol; (b) developing quantitative and qualitative research questions and skills …

SWRK 645. Urban Social Policy and Advocacy (3)

Prerequisite: Second year standing. This course is designed to help students gain knowledge and skills of policy practice, specifically social justice advocacy. Incorporating an intersectional and critical analysis of historical and current issues related to power and privilege, students learn to create and implement effective justice-based advocacy projects to promote change. Students develop strategies for …

SWRK 650A-Z. Selected Topics in Social Work (3)

Prerequisite: Second year standing. In-depth study of a selected theme or issue in social work. Topics offered may change from semester to semester. Critical writing and reading is required. Course Title SWRK 650A Child Welfare Services SWRK 650B Addictions SWRK 650C Mental Health Wellness and Recovery SWRK 650F Suicide Prevention SWRK 650M Group Therapy SWRK …

SWRK 698. Graduate Project (3)

Prerequisite: SWRK 635. The MSW graduate program culminates in an individual, or collaborative of two, research projects reflecting the students interests and needs as developers and critical consumers of science-based information to inform practice decisions. The Graduate Project requires students to collect, analyze and report direct observations; and write a research paper that includes an …

SWRK 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Second year standing. This course may be taken to develop expertise in areas not included in the regular curriculum or as preparation for the comprehensive examination.

URBS 150. Discover the City (3)

This course requires students to make connections between their daily experiences and urban life. Housing, neighborhoods, parks, transportation, environmental conditions, urban infrastructure and other aspects of urban living are examined. Students will investigate a range of urban problems and effective solutions with examples from Southern California and elsewhere. Course assignments will include active exploration of …

URBS 206. Introduction to Graphic Communication Tools Used by Urban Studies and Planning Professionals (3)

This course will focus on graphic communication tools commonly used by planning professionals. The development of maps, charts, drawings and 3D visualizations enhance the ability of professionals to interact with clients and the public. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to perform spatial analysis and present spatial data will be emphasized. The course will …

URBS 250. Planning the Multiethnic City (3)

Comprehensive analysis of the social, cultural and land use structure of cities in the U.S. since 1900. A major focus of the course will be on the significant demographic changes that have influenced urban and public policy since 1975. This course will explore a myriad of issues related to multiethnic constituencies and conservation of heritage in …

URBS 300. Planning Theory (3)

Prerequisite: URBS 150 or URBS 250 or URBS 310 or instructor consent. Detailed examination of the foundational ideas and issues of the urban planning profession drawn from planning history, alternative models of planning and planning ethics. Rational, incremental, advocacy and participatory theories are examined with a focus on techniques for increasing citizen participation. Planning principles will be examined …

URBS 310. Growth and Sustainable Development of Cities (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examination of the forces contributing to the form, structure and sustainable development of cities. Emphasis on urban areas of the U.S. Conservation of resources and heritage in city development will be considered. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

URBS 340A. Quantitative Urban Research Methods (3)

This course is an introduction to research methods typically used in urban studies and planning. It provides basic skills for research design and statistical techniques appropriate for quantitative analysis. The focus of the course is on the approaches to research design, data collection, analysis of survey data and the application of statistical techniques. Students will …

URBS 340B. Qualitative Urban Research Methods (3)

Prerequisite: URBS 340A or instructor consent. This is an introduction to research designs and methodologies incorporating qualitative methods of data collection, such as archival research, interviews, behavior mapping, cognitive mapping, participant observation and survey instruments. The ethical treatment of research subjects also is addressed. This is an intensive writing course: Students are required to read …

URBS 345. The General Plan and Zoning (3)

This course deals with the requirements for comprehensive planning and zoning in the State of California. Emphasis will be placed on the mandated general plan elements of land use, housing, circulation, Open space, conservation, safety and noise. Special attention will be paid to formulating a framework for a general plan, and preparation, adoption and amendment …

URBS 350. Cities of the Developing World (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Urbanization process of cities with an emphasis on the historical background and the social, economic, cultural and political factors responsible for shaping cities in the developing world. Spatial dimensions of the urbanization process and common urban problems are explored using case studies of cities in Africa, Latin …

URBS 380. Los Angeles: Past, Present, Future (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Multidisciplinary investigation of the Los Angeles urban area, its patterns of population and resources distribution; its historical, economic, social and cultural developments; and policies models designed to cope with its problems and to develop its potential as an ethnically diverse metropolis on the Pacific Rim. Application of social …

URBS 400. Planning for the Natural and Built Environment (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. Relationships between people and technology in the city, and the application of resources to supply such urban needs as transportation, waste disposal, water and communication. Technological change and forecasting. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 415. The California Environmental Quality Act for Urban Planners (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. This course deals with California’s statutory requirements for environmental planning and policy. The focus of the course will be on the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process that addresses issuance of Negative Declarations, preparation of draft and final environmental impact reports (EIRs), litigation, decision making and the requirements of …

URBS 416. Urban Housing (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. This course is designed to help students explore the complexity of housing and housing-related issues from a planning perspective. Students will develop a basic understanding of the housing market, its relationship to community development and its importance to communities and the U.S. economy. A wide variety of topics …

URBS 425. Social Policy, Environmental Justice and the City (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. Addresses the linkages between urban social policy, distributional equity in local and federal programs, and environmental movements initiated as a response to regressive land use and/or planning strategies. Specific areas of social policy that are analyzed in this course are housing policies and programs, economic development and revitalization, transportation, …

URBS 430. Planning in the Public Sector (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. Analysis of public and private institutions through which modern urban society functions, with emphasis on the structure and functions of cities from the perspective of their organizational life. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 435. Planning for Community Development (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. Examination of the theories of local economic development and how each theory informs real-world policy and practice. Implementation and implications of alternative strategies are illustrated by specific case studies. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 440. Community-Based Urban Design (3)

Prerequisites: URBS 206, URBS 340A and URBS 340B; or instructor consent. The study of current urban design techniques and policies and their application to local communities and neighborhoods. Digital tools and computer aided design will be utilized for site planning. Local communities will be involved in the urban design process utilizing various community participation techniques, as the class collaborates to …

URBS 450. Senior Seminar in Urban Studies and Planning (4)

Prerequisites: URBS 206, URBS 340A or other equivalent research methods course, URBS 340B and senior standing; or instructor consent. Advanced seminar on contemporary topics in urban studies and planning.  Students are required to produce a culminating research project. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 460. Legal Foundations of Planning (3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing and URBS 300; or instructor consent. This course is a general introduction to land use planning law in the United States. It looks primarily at the state, regional and municipal levels, with an emphasis on practices and procedures to manage land use and growth in California. The course covers four broad …

URBS 480. Urban Transportation Planning (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. This course is a general introduction to the interrelated systems of urban transportation and urban land use and their effects on the growth, development and future of human settlements. The course will provide entry-level competence for students seeking employment in transportation planning in the public or private sectors. Four …

URBS 490C. Fieldwork (3)

Prerequisites: Senior standing and URBS 340A, URBS 340B, URBS 206 or other equivalent research methods courses; or instructor consent. Urban field research using quantitative and/or qualitative analytical techniques through supervised projects. The ethics of professional planning and research will be practiced. Final projects may be presented to community stakeholders at instructor’s discretion. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 494A-C. Internship (1-3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. Upon prior approval by the internship coordinator, students may earn up to 6 units for professional experience in a planning department, social service agency or other public or private organization dealing with urban problems. The course will focus on professional preparation and ethics of professional practice in urban …

URBS 495A-Z. Selected Topics in Urban Planning (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor consent. Deals with a wide range of topics and specializations that are customarily dealt with by professional urban planners. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Urban Studies and Planning (1-3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Selected topics in urban studies and planning, with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study. Available for graduate credit.

URBS 610. Contemporary Urban Planning in the United States and California (3)

Provides an overview of urban planning as practiced in the U.S. The course assumes some familiarity with urban planning and builds on common issues and problems in the field utilizing a topical approach. Such critical issues as transportation, housing, social and environmental justice, citizen participation, urban design, urban sprawl, sustainable development and New Urbanism will …

URBS 615. Analytical Principles and Practices in Urban Planning (3)

Planners manage resources, such as people, time, money, land, and infrastructure and success depends on the careful identification of scarce resources, constraints and conflicts. Within this context, students learn how to apply important principles to solve urban problems. Rather than examine theory in the abstract, students apply analysis to an array of important issues that …

URBS 620. Seminar in Comprehensive Planning (3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the general plan and zoning process in the U.S. and California. Special emphasis will be placed on the plan elements dealing with land use, housing, circulation, open space, conservation, safety and noise. Zoning will be addressed in terms of the structure and content of zoning ordinances and the …

URBS 630. Sustainable Development and Environmental Impact Analysis (3)

This course deals with approaches to planning for sustainable development and the requirements for environmental planning and policy associated with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This act and regulatory guidelines can serve as a model for impact analysis in any global setting. A special emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of sustainable …

URBS 640. Seminar in Planning for Communities and Local Economic Development (3)

This course focuses on the study of human behavior as it is affected by basic human needs and urban conditions. Special attention will be given to: (1) the manner in which local neighborhoods and communities are integrated into the planning process and how needs are articulated; and (2) the manner in which local economic development …

URBS 650. Policy Analysis and Implementation (3)

Public policy analysis and implementation is an important element within the larger process of public policy making. It is a growing field in academic research and a growing professional field in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. The course provides an introduction to the fundamental theories, concepts, terms, and methodologies associated with public policy analysis …

URBS 660. Planning Law (3)

This course will provide a background of the American legal system for non-law students and then focus on land use controls in the United States. Understanding the legal foundations for planning provides the professional planner with the ability to recommend, write and create effective policies and successfully implement those policies. Understanding issues of zoning, eminent …

URBS 670. Visual Communication Skills for Urban Planners (3)

The course will focus on graphic communication skills for urban planners. It will provide an introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) as a spatial data analysis tool for planners. It will also be an introduction to Creative Suite applications to utilize them for graphic communication and map making.

URBS 680. Quantitative Analysis in Urban Planning (3)

This course exposes students to a range of quantitative analysis techniques typically applied to the study of urban phenomena. As a critical part of coursework students explore relevant data sources and appropriate data analysis methods. Students perform various diagnostic tests on quantitative data as they build their own datasets using statistical software. Both bivariate and …

URBS 685. Qualitative Research in Urban Planning (3)

The course focuses on qualitative research methods to address urban planning and social science related problems. Qualitative methods such as interviews, focus groups, observations, cognitive mapping, participant observation, and questionnaires will be utilized with corresponding research designs and methodologies such as ethnography and critical inquiry. Content analysis with coding process in grounded theory will be …

URBS 690. Field Project in Urban Planning (3)

In preparation for the capstone course, students work with the instructor and a community partner to address a local planning problem, to determine the appropriate scope of work, and to conduct research and analysis.

URBS 698. Professional Project (3)

The emphasis is on the blending of practical skills with knowledge gained from core-area courses. The course focuses on application of planning theory and use of research and analysis skills for implementation in community and regional professional projects.