UNIVERSITY CATALOG: 2020-2021

Courses

AT 500. Evidence-Based Practice in Athletic Training (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training program. An introduction course to the research process and evidence-based practice. Topics include formulating a clinical question, searching for evidence, and critical appraisal of the literature. Students will develop the foundations that will allow them to practice healthcare in an evidence-based manner.

AT 501/L. Foundations in Athletic Training and Laboratory (3/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training Program. Corequisite: AT 501L. This course provides foundational knowledge and skills the students can apply to their clinical experiences in the field of athletic training.

AT 502. Pain Neuroscience in Athletic Training (2)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training program. This course provides Athletic Training students with a foundation in pain neuroscience as it pertains to injury assessment, diagnosis and rehabilitation in athletic training.

AT 510/L. Clinical Anatomy and Biomechanics and Laboratory (2/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training Program. Corequisite: AT 510L. Introduction to clinical anatomy and clinical biomechanics. Biomechanical analysis of human movement based on anatomical concepts and mechanical laws of motion as it pertains to injury assessment, diagnosis, rehabilitation, and prevention in athletic training.

AT 520/L. Lower Extremity Injury Evaluation and Laboratory (3/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training. Corequisite: AT 520L. This course is designed to introduce students to the etiology and pathophysiology of orthopedic and non-orthopedic injuries to the lower extremity. Students will learn to evaluate acute and chronic lower extremity orthopedic injuries and conditions using evidence-based diagnostic techniques.

AT 521/L. Upper Extremity Injury Evaluation and Laboratory (3/1)

Corequisite: AT 521L. This course is designed to introduce students to the etiology and pathophysiology of orthopedic and non-orthopedic injuries to the upper extremity. Students will learn to evaluate acute and chronic upper extremity orthopedic injuries and conditions using evidence-based diagnostic techniques.

AT 530/L. Therapeutic Interventions for Lower Extremity Injuries and Laboratory (3/1)

Corequisite: AT 530L. This course is designed to prepare Athletic Training students to design and implement evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation programs for the lower extremity, which include therapeutic exercise, non-exercise modalities, return to play clinical decision making.

AT 531/L. Therapeutic Interventions for Upper Extremity Injuries and Laboratory (3/1)

Corequisite: AT 531L. This course is designed to prepare Athletic Training students to design and implement evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation programs for the upper extremity, which include therapeutic exercise, non-exercise modalities, return to play, and clinical decision making.

AT 540. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training I (1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training program. The Clinical Experiences series is designed to allow Athletic Training students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As this first course in a six-part series, Clinical …

AT 541. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training II (1)

The Clinical Experiences series is designed to allow Athletic Training students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As this second course in a six-part series, Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training II allows Athletic Training students to practice, apply …

AT 542. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training III (1)

The Clinical Experiences series is designed to allow Athletic Training students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As this third course in a six-part series, Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training III allows Athletic Training students to practice, apply …

AT 550/L. Primary Care I and Laboratory (3/1)

Corequisite: AT 550L. This course is designed to prepare Athletic Training students to meet didactic competencies and clinical proficiencies associated with recognizing, evaluating, treating, and referring medical conditions in the general population as well as appropriate pharmacological interventions. This is the first course of a two-course sequence. In this course students will attain foundational knowledge …

AT 560. Seminar in Athletic Training I (1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the professional Master of Science in Athletic Training program. The Athletic Training Seminar series is designed to introduce Athletic Training students to relevant professional topics and socialize students on what it means to be an AT within the greater healthcare context. Deliverables in this series will prepare students to meet didactic competencies …

AT 561. Seminar in Athletic Training II (1)

The Athletic Training Seminar series is designed to introduce Athletic Training students to relevant professional topics and socialize students on what it means to be an AT within the greater healthcare context. Deliverables in this series will prepare students to meet didactic competencies and clinical proficiencies associated with patient centered care, quality improvement, professionalism, and …

AT 562. Seminar in Athletic Training III (1)

The Athletic Training Seminar series is designed to introduce Athletic Training students to relevant professional topics and socialize students on what it means to be an AT within the greater healthcare context. Deliverables in this series will prepare students to meet didactic competencies and clinical proficiencies associated with patient centered care, quality improvement, professionalism, and …

AT 610/L. Reconditioning and Human Performance and Laboratory (2/1)

Corequisite: AT 610L. This course will prepare Athletic Training students to develop and implement late phase rehabilitation protocols, return to play protocols and physical preparation programs.

AT 620. Organization and Administration of Athletic Training (3)

Athletic Training students will learn techniques and strategies required to manage Athletic Training Programs in the professional world. Students will gain an understanding of risk management, healthcare delivery mechanisms, insurance, reimbursement, documentation, patient privacy, facility management and professional development.

AT 630/L. Advanced Manual Therapy and Laboratory (3/1)

Corequisite: AT 630L. An introduction to instrument assisted soft-tissue mobilization and joint manipulation.

AT 640. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training IV, Primary Care (1)

The Clinical Experiences series is designed to allow Athletic Training students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As this fourth course in a six-part series, Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training IV provides the Athletic Training student a clinical …

AT 641. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training V (1)

The Clinical Experiences series is designed to allow Athletic Training students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As this fifth course in a six-part series, Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training V provides the Athletic Training student a comprehensive …

AT 642. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training VI, Immersive (1)

Clinical Experience series is designed to allow Athletic Training Students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As the final course in a six-part series, Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training VI provides the Athletic Training Student an immersive clinical …

AT 642A. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training VI, Immersive A (1)

Corequisite: AT 642. The Clinical Experience series is designed to allow Athletic Training students opportunities for practice and the development of clinical skills learned in the classroom and to increase autonomy of patient care in clinical practice. As the final course and culminating experience in a six-part series, Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training VI provides …

AT 650/L. Primary Care II and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: AT 650L. This course is designed to prepare Athletic Training students to meet didactic competencies and clinical proficiencies associated with recognizing, evaluating, treating, and referring medical conditions in the general population as well as appropriate pharmacological interventions. This course is part the final course in a two-course sequence. In this course students apply knowledge …

AT 660. Emerging Trends in Athletic Training (2)

Prerequisite: AT 610. This course will orient Athletic Training students to various emerging trends in athletic training, specifically to the areas of nutrition, primary care, orthopedic examination and rehabilitation. For each topic, Athletic Training students will apply evidence-based practice skills to provide a foundation for their own future clinical decisions.

AT 670. Diversity and Inclusion in Athletic Training (2)

This course prepares Athletic Training students to practice in a culturally competent and inclusive manner in order to deliver the most effective and highest quality healthcare experience. This course will identify specific underserved populations and outline treatment and interaction strategies to improve patient outcomes in these populations.

AT 680. Practical Applications of Injury Prevention (2)

This course introduces Athletic Training students to evidence-based injury prevention models. Students will combine clinical and didactic skills learned in previous courses, with best available evidence, to create highly specific injury prevention programs for high risk populations.

AT 698. Graduate Project (3)

Athletic Training students will critically analyze a meta-analysis or systematic review and develop a manuscript with specific clinical recommendations.

ATHL 197A-Z. Off-Season Conditioning (1-1-1-1)

Conditioning exercises and drills for varsity sports in the off season. May be repeated for 4 units credit. (Credit/No Credit only)

ATHL 200. Level Series Varsity Athletics (2-2-2-2)

In season practice and competition. May be repeated for 8 units credit. (Credit/No Credit only) Course Title ATHL 200 Varsity Baseball–M ATHL 201 Varsity Basketball–M ATHL 202 Varsity Basketball–W ATHL 204 Varsity Cross Country–M ATHL 205 Varsity Cross Country–W ATHL 208 Varsity Golf–M ATHL 210 Varsity Golf–W ATHL 215 Varsity Soccer–M ATHL 216 Varsity Soccer–W …

ATHS 501. Functional Biology and Design Innovation (3)

This course is designed to provide an understanding of biological systems, anatomical and physiologic functions, injury and disease, and their relevance to assistive technology, while introducing students to how living systems can be used as inspiration of biomimicry in assistive technology. (Cross-listed with ATE 501.)

ATHS 502. Seminar in Human Characteristics in Relation to Usability of Assistive Technologies (3)

This seminar provides an advanced level overview of and investigation into the bases of human functioning from the physiological and psychological perspectives, as a foundation for the design and development of assistive technology devices (ATD) that can effectively be utilized by multigenerational users to enhance their quality of life. Utilizing critical thinking skills, participants will …

ATHS 614. Assistive Technology Across the Lifespan (3)

This course will provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals underlying the application of assistive technology interventions across a variety of environments. This course is an interdisciplinary exposure to assistive technology, preparatory for the design and application of assistive technologies to improve functional independence and quality of life across cultures and generations.

ATHS 618. Research Methods and Design in Assistive Technology (3)

Study of various types of research used in assistive technology, and techniques employed in collecting, classifying, interpreting and presenting data. Ethical concerns are also presented.

ATHS 619. History, Law, Policy and Assistive Technology (3)

This seminar will investigate the history and development of assistive technology, the legal context, public policy including issues concerning financing and access to assistive technology, and emerging issues.

ATHS 621. Assistive Technology Assessment and Outcome Measures (3)

This course emphasizes the assistive technology assessment process with a focus on the end user. The course further focuses on the processes of assessing the strengths and needs of each individual, their environment, assistive technology options, training needs, affordability, and determining obstacles that might prevent adoption or lead to user abandonment. Lastly, the course emphasizes …

ATHS 622. Counseling in Assistive Technology Service Delivery (3)

This course will enhance the understanding and practice of the counseling and human services aspects of assistive technology, utilizing a multigenerational and multicultural approach.

ATHS 623. Medical Conditions Affecting Quality of Life (3)

Prerequisite: ATHS 501. This course will help the learner understand the various body systems and the impact that pathology has on an individual’s functioning within one’s chosen environment, in preparation for the design and application of assistive technologies to improve functional independence and quality of life. Essential to working with clients with a variety of …

ATHS 694. Current and Emerging Topics in Assistive Technology (1-1-1)

This seminar course will incorporate advanced study of current and emerging topics in assistive technology analyzed by means of readings, analysis of cases and problems, case studies, presentations, demonstrations and class discussion. (Cross-listed with ATE 694.) (Credit/No Credit only)

ATHS 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate coordinator permission, ATHS 694 (1-1) and satisfactory completion of all ATHS coursework. Preparation for and completion of written comprehensive case studies to fulfill the culminating experience requirement for the Master of Science in Assistive Technology and Human Services degree. Culminating Experience (Credit/No Credit Only)

CADV 150. Foundations of Child and Adolescent Development (3)

This course surveys typical and atypical child and adolescent development. Topics include, but are not limited to: physical, social, cognitive, and language changes over time, as well as how to address special needs and at risk youth. Readings and coursework provide basic grounding in the major theories/theorists of human development, major topics in cognitive, social …

CADV 180. Statistics in Applied Developmental Science (3)

Prerequisite: Child and Adolescent Development major. This course introduces fundamental skills of statistical reasoning used in research in the developmental sciences including techniques of data collection, organization, presentation analysis and interpretation using statistical analysis tools. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and sampling distributions; statistical inference; correlation and linear regression; analysis of variance, chi-square and t-tests; …

CADV 196A-Z. Experimental Topics (1-6)

Topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Different topics may be taken for credit.

CADV 250. Professional Pathways and Careers in Child and Adolescent Development (3)

Engages students in the process of transitioning from college student to professional employee through career planning and development. Students participate in thoughtful self-assessment of their own interests, values, and skills as well as career exploration and planning of preliminary and long-range employment options and strategies within the field of child and adolescent development. Contemporary professional …

CADV 310. Developmental Impacts of Abuse and Neglect (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: CADV 150. Survey of the cognitive, physical, social/emotional effects of abuse and neglect spanning conception through emerging adulthood. Historical perspectives related to abuse and neglect of children, adolescents, and young adults including current trends/topics are explored. Ethical and practical issues regarding maltreatment relevant to current and prospective …

CADV 327. Infancy and Early Childhood (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150 or PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite for Psychology major only: PSY 301. Relevant aspects of physical, social, cognitive and emotional change are highlighted as part of human development from conception to early childhood (conception to 8 years). Emphasis on the study of the underlying processes and influences …

CADV 335. Middle Childhood (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150 or PSY 150; completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite for Psychology majors only: PSY 301. This course examines developmental changes in the middle childhood years (7-12 years). Emphasis is on current research and major theories associated with middle childhood development. Cultural contexts of development, key changes, continuity and individual differences …

CADV 350. Applied Cognitive Development (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: CADV 150. Students survey major topics of cognitive development from infancy to adolescence, review research literature about environmental factors that influence children’s cognitive development and assess the implications for observing and working with children and their families. Students have an opportunity to learn how children’s developing …

CADV 352. Applied Social Development (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: CADV 150. This course surveys human social development from infancy through adolescence. Several theoretical frameworks that inform the study of social development are presented, as well as empirical evidence extending knowledge of the processes and content of social development. Emphasis is placed on connecting theories and …

CADV 361. Adolescence (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150 or PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite for Psychology majors only: PSY 301. Analysis of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes from puberty to adulthood. Examines contemporary youth culture from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. Discusses evaluation of age norms and deviant development. Project involving some aspect …

CADV 373. Emerging Adulthood (3)

Prerequisite: CADV 150 or PSY 150. This course surveys the developmental changes during the period of emerging adulthood (18-25 years old). Cultural contexts, key changes, continuity and individual differences across both typical and atypical development are examined. The course explores changes in physiology, changes in thinking, changes in social interactions, the context within which these changes …

CADV 380/L. Methods of Child and Adolescent Study I and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: Completion of the lower division writing requirement and completion of the lower division math requirement. Preparatory: CADV 150 or MATH 140. Introductory course in techniques, use, presentation, and understanding of research principles in child and adolescent development and related fields. This course is designed to teach you to think scientifically, addressing the logic of correlational, experimental, and …

CADV 381/L. Methods of Child and Adolescent Study II and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: CADV 380/L or PSY 320/L. Corequisite: CADV 381L. This course is designed to build on students’ knowledge of the scientific process of studying children and adolescents. Major topics include a consideration of the philosophical and conceptual underpinnings of research, the structures and conduct of research inquiry and the generation of research questions and hypotheses. General …

CADV 394. Child and Adolescent Development Internship I (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150; PSY 150. Pre- or Corequisite: CADV 350 or CADV 352. Students must complete an application (available in Department Office) in the Spring semester prior to enrolling the following Fall. First of a two-semester internship sequence enabling students to apply theory to practice in a community setting. Internship includes 90 hours of service …

CADV 406/L. Enhancing Childhood Creativity and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: CADV 406L. An Integrative seminar and lab experience focusing on the theoretical approaches for enhancing childhood creativity. The uses of play and fantasy are explored as means for developing programs that are child-oriented. Regular written assignments are required. (Cross-listed with RTM 406/L.)

CADV 450. Helping Children Cope with Medical Environments (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. The developmental impact of illness, disability and hospitalization on children and youth are studied. Methods used by child development specialists to help children cope with the emotional stress of ill health and disability will be presented.

CADV 451. Alternative Approaches to Discipline (3)

Investigation of literature on discipline in child development settings. Practical and theoretical approaches are related and integrated.

CADV 452. Child Advocacy (3)

Designed to increase student knowledge of local, state and national advocacy organizations and their influence on public policy. Focus is on the individual child development professional’s role as a child advocate.

CADV 453. Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150 or PSY 150; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: CADV 380/L. Students investigate empirical research and evidence-based practice related to children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders.

CADV 455. Effective Mentoring in Child and Adolescent Development (3-3)

Prerequisites: CADV 150 or PSY 150; Preparatory: CADV 350 or CADV 352. This course will prepare students for success in graduate school and in their careers by increasing their understanding of theories of leadership/mentorship from CADV fields and providing opportunities to practice professional skills and apply leadership strategies to real-world scenarios and with increasingly diverse …

CADV 456. Coping with Grief and Loss in Childhood and Adolescence (3)

Preparatory: CADV 350 or CADV 352. This course will examine major theories and topics related to grief and loss affecting humans from infancy through adolescence. It will review key developmental theories and concepts regarding death and the process of bereavement. The course includes both normal and traumatic grief and loss common to children and adolescents, …

CADV 460. Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Culture in Development (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: CADV 150. Explores the development of ethnic minority children and adolescents in multicultural settings. Particular focus is placed on students’ exploration of their own understandings and awareness of culture, ethnicity and gender, based on the premise that effective professionals must clearly understand their own personal biases …

CADV 470. Advanced Theories in Child and Adolescent Development (3)

Prerequisites: CADV 350 or CADV 352; CADV 380/L. Passing score on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. This capstone course is a culminating experience for majors. It facilitates professional development through high level discussions and thinking on concepts and theories of development for transition into graduate-level programs in human development or related fields and/or into a …

CADV 494. Child and Adolescent Development Internship II (3)

Prerequisite: CADV 394. The second semester internship builds on the in-depth understanding of the program and experiences gained from the first semester internship. Individual goals enhance the professional development of students. Includes 90 hours of service in a community setting/organization in addition to regular class meetings. (Credit/No Credit only)

CADV 495A. Child and Adolescent Development Graduate School Skills and Applied Research Training I (3)

Prerequisite: Students must complete department application. Recommended Preparatory: CADV 150; CADV 380/L or PSY 320/L or FCS 431; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course will address issues associated with becoming a professional in the field of child and adolescent development through developing applied research skills that will facilitate entry into graduate and …

CADV 495B. Child and Adolescent Development Graduate School Skills and Applied Research Training II (3)

Prerequisite: CADV 495A or consent of instructor. This course builds on the foundation of applied research methods in CADV 495A by providing opportunities for students to integrate the theories and constructs of applied research in the field of child and adolescent development toward further development of graduate school skills and training. Through participation in weekly …

CADV 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3)

Topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Different topics may be taken for credit.

CADV 497AA-ZZ. Special Topics in Child and Adolescent Development (3)

Recommended Preparatory: CADV 350, CADV 352, CADV 380/L. Innovative courses of study. Topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Different topics may be taken for credit.

CADV 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Arranged with the permission of the instructor. Enrollment in an Independent Study is by permission of the department chair and with the consent of the instructor who agrees to be a sponsor. Enrollment is granted based on evidence of the student’s ability to work independently on a project. Students who are on probation or …

CD 133. Survey of Communication Disorders (3)

Introduction to normal development and processes of human communication, as well as an introduction to various disorders of communication that occur when these processes are delayed or disrupted. Students will learn about the scopes of practice for speech-language pathologists and audiologists, as well as speech, language, and hearing scientists, all of whom investigate and provide …

CD 361. Language Development in Children (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of oral language development in children and the bases for speech and language problems. Provides layperson awareness of the various dimensions of speech and language development; the milestones observable within the normal developmental sequence; and the identification, consequences and management of speech and language disorders. (Not …

CD 405. Phonetics (3)

Study of general phonetics principles; articulatory, acoustic and linguistic aspects of the sound systems of standard and non-standard dialects of American English; introduction to the application of phonetics to disordered sound systems.

CD 410. Hearing Science (3)

Study of physics of sound, anatomy and physiology of the earand measurement of perception of sound. Brief survey of causes of hearing impairment and habilitation procedures.

CD 415. Speech and Language Development (3)

Study of speech and language development in relation to normal learning and growth processes; brief introduction to second language acquisition.

CD 442. Speech Science (3)

Structure and function of neuro-muscular systems used in respiration, phonation, resonation and articulation; fundamentals of sound production and transmission applied to speech.

CD 445. Audiometry and Hearing Conservation (3)

Prerequisite: CD 410. Study of basic battery of audiologic tests, including equipment calibration procedures, pure tone and speech audiometry, clinical masking and the study of school and industrial identification audiometry and hearing conservation. Familiarization with basic audiologic equipment, and calibration and test procedures.

CD 446. Auditory Habilitation (3)

Prerequisite: CD 410. Theory and methods of habilitation of hearing-impaired adults and children, including assessment of hearing handicap, habilitation management, speech-reading and amplification with individual and group hearing aids.

CD 450. Fluency and Disorders of Fluency (3)

Prerequisites: CD 415, CD 442. Study of the etiology, characteristics and clinic assessment of typical/atypical stuttering in adults and children. The efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic management of fluency disorders are discussed. In addition, multicultural implications for assessment and treatment will be presented. Regular written assignments are required.

CD 451. Phonologic and Articulatory Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: CD 405, CD 415, CD 442. Examination of theories of normal and disordered acquisition of phonology and articulatory production, as well as basic phonologic assessment methods and treatment planning. Both functional and structural disorders are emphasized, including cleft lip and palate and related craniofacial syndromes. Regular written assignments are required.

CD 462. Language Disorders I (3)

Prerequisite: CD 415. Ways of conceptualizing language of parts of language; introduction to data collection, transcription and language analysis; introduction to the concept of differential diagnosis; introduction to diagnostic populations with associated developmental language disorders.

CD 465. Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology I-UG (2)

Prerequisites: CD 405 (or equivalent), CD 410 (or equivalent), CD 415 (or equivalent), CD 442 (or equivalent), CD 451 (or equivalent), CD 462 (or equivalent), CD 469A (or equivalent), CD 469O (or equivalent). Corequisites: Maintenance of clinical privileges; Consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in assessment screening and therapy for speech-, language- and deaf and …

CD 469A. Diagnostic Methods in Communication Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: CD 405, CD 410, CD 415 and CD 442. Basic concepts of standardized and non-standardized evaluation procedures for children and adults with mild to moderate communicative disorders. Theory and application of clinical writing, including the case history and the assessment report.

CD 469O. Observation and Professional Writing in Communication Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: Eligibility for Clinical Privileges (Clinical Phase) and consent of instructor. Development of entry-level case management fundamentals for prospective speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Students develop preliminary clinical skills for clinical documentation. This course completes 25 observation hours in evaluation and fundamental management of speech, language, voice and hearing disorders. Students must maintain eligibility for clinical …

CD 475. Clinical Practicum in Audiology I (2)

Prerequisites: CD 445, CD 446, CD 469A, CD 469O. Application of audiometric theory in the audiological lab, giving the student experience in the clinic routine of assessing auditory function and preparing and implementing a program of rehabilitation. 6 hours of lab per week.

CD 480. Early Speech-Language Intervention (3)

Prerequisites: CD 405, CD 415, CD 462. Advanced study of speech and language disorders, assessment procedures and intervention management of developmentally-delayed children from birth to age 5.

CD 485. Augmentative and Alternative Communication (3)

Prerequisites: CD 405 (or equivalent), CD 410 (or equivalent), CD 415 (or equivalent), CD 442 (or equivalent). The study of unaided and aided communication systems and modalities to provide augmentative and/or alternative communication habilitation and rehabilitation to communicatively handicapped individuals. Contemporary microcomputer hardware and software, program development, devices and applications in the fields of Speech-Language Pathology …

CD 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Communication Disorders and Sciences (1-3)

Prerequisite: One year of appropriate courses in Communication Disorders and Sciences. Experimental courses in Communication Disorders and Sciences, with course content to be determined.

CD 500. Background Leveling in Communication Disorders and Sciences (3)

Corequisite: Admission to the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences graduate studies program. Recommended Preparatory Courses: Course equivalents of CD 405, CD 410, CD 415, CD 442, CD 445, CD 446, CD 450, CD 451, CD 462, CD 469A. Tailored instruction for students to ensure achievement of expected competency requirements as they begin graduate study. Students …

CD 501. Interviewing and Counseling in Communicative Disorders (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Advanced study of interviewing and counseling strategies and techniques associated with diagnostic and therapeutic practice in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Professional responsibilities for ethical practices. Regular written assignments are required.

CD 502. Research in Communication Disorders (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Study of applied research methods and instrumentation in the field of communication disorders, including literature search techniques, research design, statistical tests, lab instrumentation and calibration, and report preparation. Regular written assignments are required.

CD 552. Language Disorders II (3)

Prerequisites: CD 462 or equivalent; Graduate standing. Survey of current definitions and causes of language disorder; disorders of parts of language and trade-off effects. Identification of relevant features of disordered language for assessment and intervention. Analysis of relevant features of disordered language through advanced data collection, transcription and language analysis of intonation, morphosyntactic form, communicative …

CD 558. Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Speech, Language and Hearing (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Concerned with the structural components and organization of the central and peripheral nervous systems and their conduction pathways and functions, with specific emphasis on those structures that subserve normal speech, language and hearing processes. Regular writing assignments are required.

CD 565. Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology I-GR (2-2)

Prerequisites: CD 405 (or equivalent), CD 410 (or equivalent), CD 415 (or equivalent), CD 442 (or equivalent), CD 451 (or equivalent), CD 462 (or equivalent), CD 469A (or equivalent), CD 469O (or equivalent); Graduate status. Corequisites: Maintenance of clinical privileges and consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in assessment screening, diagnosis of and therapy for speech-, language- and hearing-handicapped children and adults, academic study of specific communication problems. 6 hours of clinical skills lab per week. May be …

CD 566. Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology II (2-2)

Prerequisites: CD 405 (or equivalent), CD 410 (or equivalent), CD 415 (or equivalent), CD 442 (or equivalent), CD 451 (or equivalent), CD 462 (or equivalent), CD 465 or CD 565 (or equivalent), CD 469A (or equivalent), CD 469O (or equivalent); Graduate status. Corequisites: Maintenance of clinical privileges; Consent of instructor. 6 hours of clinical skills lab …

CD 567. Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology III (2)

Prerequisites: CD 566 (or equivalent); Graduate status. Corequisites: Maintenance of clinical privileges; Consent of instructor. 6 hours of clinical skills lab per week. May be repeated one time.

CD 576. Clinical Practicum in Audiology II (2)

Prerequisite: CD 475. 6 hours of lab per week.

CD 577. Clinical Practicum in Audiology III (2)

Prerequisite: Graduate status. 6 hours of lab per week.

CD 651. Advanced Study of Articulation and Phonological Disorders in Children (3)

Prerequisites: CD 451, CD 462, CD 469A, CD 558 or the equivalents; Graduate standing. Advanced study of speech acquisition, differential diagnosis of pediatric speech disorders and principles of intervention.

CD 659. Neurogenic Disorders of Cognition and Language (3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the department’s graduate program; CD 558. Corequisite: Consent of instructor. This course includes advanced study of the neurological bases for language and cognitive deficits, as well as theoretical views of the organization of these components. Primary focus is given to the diagnosis and treatment of common communication problems in adults with aphasia, …

CD 660. Structural and Neurogenic Speech Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: CD 558; Admission to the department’s graduate program. Corequisite: Consent of instructor. This course focuses on the advanced study of structural and neurogenic speech disorders, including models of motor control of speech production, neurological representation of speech and the effects of structural or neurological damage on speech production. Students will identify specific speech deficits …

CD 661. Voice and Disorders of Voice (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the department’s graduate program. Corequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of theoretical, diagnostic and treatment issues in functional/organic/neurogenic/and psychgenic voice disorders. In addition, diagnostic and treatment options for laryngeal, head and neck cancer are presented. Multicultural implications for assessment and treatment are discussed. Regular written assignments are required, as well as proficiency with …

CD 662. Seminar in Developmental Language Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: CD 552; Graduate standing. Advanced study of current research relating to the differential diagnosis of populations with associated developmental language disorders, including specific language impairment, language/learning disabilities, central auditory processing disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, psychiatric disorders, mental retardation and other populations with associated developmental disorder.

CD 663. Adult and Pediatric Swallowing/Feeding Disorders (3)

Prerequisites: CD 558; Admission to the department’s graduate program. Corequisite: Consent of instructor. This course focuses on the theoretical and clinical aspects of the disorders of swallowing or dysphagia. The physiology of normal swallow is studied as it develops across the lifespan. The etiologies of dysphagia in both the pediatric and adult populations are examined, …

CD 668. Advanced Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology (3)

Prerequisites: CD 465, CD 566, CD 567, CD 552, CD 558, CD 651, CD 659, CD 661; Maintenance of clinical privileges; Consent of instructor. Advanced diagnosis and evaluation of children and adults with complex disorders of speech and/or language and/or cognition. Clinical experience in taking a history, constructing a test battery, administering norm-referenced tests, performing informal assessment …

CD 672A. Advanced Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology and Audiology I (3)

Prerequisites: CD 465, CD 566, CD 567 (or equivalents) and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with children and adults who have disorders in speech, language, voice, resonance and swallowing. Practicum placement may include sites such as transitional centers, private practices, hospitals or community health service centers. Interdisciplinary staff …

CD 672B. Advanced Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology and Audiology II (3)

Prerequisites: CD 465, CD 566, CD 567, CD 672A (or equivalents) and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with children and adults who have disorders in speech, language, voice, resonance and swallowing. Enrollment in CD 672B emphasizes finalization of all knowledge and skill competencies expected for entry level into …

CD 672C. Advanced Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology and Audiology II (6)

Prerequisites: CD 465, CD 566, CD 567, CD 672A (or equivalents). Corequisites: Maintenance of clinical privileges; Consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with children and adults who have disorders in speech, language, voice, resonance and swallowing. Enrollment in 672C emphasizes finalization of all knowledge and skill competencies expected for entry level …

CD 674. Pediatric Audiology (3)

Prerequisites: CD 445, CD 446. Advanced study of the causation, assessment and management of auditory disorders in infants and children.

CD 696B. Directed Graduate Research (2-2-2)

Prerequisite: Admission to graduate studies in Communication Disorders and Sciences. Corequisites: Consent of instructor; Maintenance of clinical privileges. Supervised experience conducting research in communication disorders and sciences. Research projects will be designed and/or carried out in collaboration with a supervising CDS faculty member. May be taken for credit a total of three times.

CD 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of all courses required in the program.

CD 708. Advanced Anatomy and Physiology of Auditory System (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. The anatomical and physiological mechanisms for the peripheral and central auditory systems with normal and abnormal functions are covered in this course. In addition, research on auditory physiology will be discussed.

CD 717. Management of Speech and Language Disorders for Audiologists (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. This course introduces various aspects of audiology as they relate especially to infants and children developing speech, language and literacy when those populations are deaf, hard of hearing, have auditory processing disorders or have acquired hearing loss. Topics include: review of typical speech, language and literacy development, and …

CD 720. Psychoacoustics and Speech Perception (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. This course will explore auditory processing of acoustic signals including non-speech and speech sounds in normal and abnormal human auditory systems. Lecture will be combined with laboratory activities as the major format of the class. The course will emphasize anatomy and physiology of the peripheral and central auditory system, …

CD 724. Advanced Audiometry Evaluation (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. This course includes advanced instruction in the development and application of standard diagnostic audiology procedures, as well as instrumentation and calibration standards for audiology practice. Advanced instruction for the administration and interpretation of standard audiometric tests is also included.

CD 730. Clinical Methods and Instrumentation (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. This class instructs the foundations of audiology practice and how the practice inserts into the diagnostic and therapeutic processes of clinical decision making. Students will study how data from technology, such as acoustic signals—calibration—evaluation results of hearing assessment, contribute to patient responses and clinical judgement in developing a …

CD 740. Rehabilitation Audiology (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708, CD 720 (or equivalents), and admission to the AuD graduate program. This class introduces principles of amplification, personal and group amplification systems, cochlear implants, sound-field acoustics as well as vestibular rehabilitation and pharmacology of hearing. The course will provide opportunities to practice principles of aural rehabilitation in the implementation of intervention methods …

CD 742A. Auditory Amplification I (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708 (or equivalent) and admission to the AuD graduate program. This course analyzes the theories and concepts of current technology with regard to amplification systems for hearing impaired patients. Standard audiological batteries for comprehensive aural rehabilitation and treatment processes and various types of amplification systems and accessories appropriated for each hearing impaired individual …

CD 742B. Auditory Amplification II (3)

Prerequisites: CD 742A (or equivalent) and admission to the AuD graduate program. In this course, advanced topics in amplification devices and systems are discussed. Audiologic rehabilitation and case management of individuals with hearing loss, as well as careproviders, are presented in formats that promote critical thinking skills and adaptive skills that are required of audiologists …

CD 744. Interviewing and Counseling in Audiology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. Advanced study of strategies and techniques for effective interviewing and counseling of patients and care providers involved with the diagnostic and therapeutic practices in audiology. Professional responsibilities for ethical practices specifically related to patient care during the interviewing and counseling processes are investigated.

CD 745. Pathologies of Auditory System (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708, CD 724 (or equivalents), and admission to the AuD graduate program. This course is designed to address symptoms, etiology and pathology, site of lesion, audiological evaluation and management of selected peripheral and central auditory disorders. Particular attention will be paid to anatomy and physiology of the specific disorder, patient symptoms, choosing appropriate …

CD 748. Educational Audiology (3)

Prerequisites: CD 740 (or equivalent) and admission to the AuD graduate program. The focus of this course is on clinical competencies in the aural (re)habilitation of deaf and hard-of-hearing children specifically within educational settings. The course has a strong interdisciplinary focus, considering ethnic and cultural variables in (re)habilitation processes for children with congenital and acquired hearing …

CD 750. Assessment and Intervention of Vestibular System (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708 (or equivalent) and admission to the AuD graduate program. This course emphasized instruction of the anatomy and physiology of the balance system and the evaluation and diagnosis of vestibular dysfunction. Students will develop specific knowledge and skills associated with evaluation and treatment of patients with balance disorders.

CD 752. Implantable Auditory Prostheses (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708 and CD 720 (or equivalents), and admission to the AuD graduate program. Implantable Auditory Prostheses is one of academic/clinical courses which explores the many different areas and issues related to auditory devices that are implantable. Topics to be covered include signal processing, candidacy determination, medical considerations, steps in programming, aural (re)habilitation techniques, …

CD 753A. Electrophysiology of Auditory System I (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708 (or equivalent) and admission to the AuD graduate program. This course provides a fundamental knowledge base in the underlying scientific background, relevant clinical applications, and methods in the practice of physiological clinical measures associated with audiology; measures include otoacoustic emissions and auditory evoked potentials and specifically, the auditory brainstem response (ABR) test.

CD 753B. Electrophysiology of Auditory System II (3)

Prerequisites: CD 708, CD 753A (or equivalents), and admission to the AuD graduate program. This course experience covers advanced topics pertaining to the theoretical and clinical aspects of auditory evoked potentials. Topics include vestibular differential diagnosis, evoked otoacoustic emissions (distortion-product, transient evoked, and stimulus frequency), electrocochleography, bone and horizontal evoked potential recordings, middle latency responses, …

CD 755. Advanced Pediatric Audiology: Development, Assessment and Intervention (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. In this course, students will study the embryologic and physiologic development of the auditory system, genetics and hearing loss, as well as non-genetic causes of hearing loss, auditory disorders in children including otitis media and auditory processing disorder, and physiological and behavioral assessments of auditory function commonly used …

CD 760. Research Methods in Audiology (3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the AuD graduate program and instructor consent. This course involves the study of applied research methods in the field of communication disorders, and most specifically, the field of audiology. This course includes instruction in application of common statistical topics such as univariate data, probability, bivariate data, estimation and tests of significance; these …

CD 762. Business Aspects in Audiology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. This course covers legal, ethical and multicultural issues within various practice settings associated with the field of audiology and the roles of audiologists. Topics include professional issues related to scope of practice, treatment outcome measures, licensure, certification, malpractice issues, financial considerations and practice management.

CD 764. Industrial, Occupational and Forensic Audiology (3)

Prerequisites: CD 730 (or equivalent) and admission to the AuD graduate program. This course covers the topics of identification and prevention of hearing loss in children and adults due to the effects and impacts of different settings and occupations, and assessment and management of auditory processing disorders in adult populations. Additionally, the roles of audiologists …

CD 767. Interdisciplinary Aspects in Audiology: Contemporary Issues (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the AuD graduate program. The need for effective interdisciplinary collaboration by audiologists is essential for effective case management. Policies and practices outside of the health care management that is specifically directed by hearing specialists can have strong influences that impact assessment decisions, treatment decisions and counseling directions. This course investigates issues facing …

CD 770. Clinical Practicum in Audiology I (3-3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the AuD graduate program, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in assessment, screening and therapy for speech-, language- and deaf and hard of hearing children and adults, academic study of specific communication difficulties and audiological disorders. Nine hours of clinical skills lab per week. May be repeated one time.

CD 771. Clinical Practicum in Audiology II (3-3)

Prerequisites: CD 770 with a grade of “A” or “B” (or equivalent), maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. Nine hours of clinical skills lab …

CD 772. Clinical Practicum in Audiology III (3-3)

Prerequisites: CD 771 with a grade of “A” or “B” (or equivalent), maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. Nine hours of clinical skills lab …

CD 773. Clinical Practicum in Audiology IV (3-3)

Prerequisites: CD 772 with a grade of “A” or “B” (or equivalent), maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system, vestibular system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. Nine hours of clinical …

CD 774. Clinical Practicum in Audiology V (3-3)

Prerequisites: CD 773 with a grade of “A” or “B” (or equivalent), maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system, vestibular system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. Nine hours of clinical …

CD 775A. Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiology I (6)

Prerequisites: CD 774 with a grade of “A” or “B”, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system, vestibular system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. CD 775A is the first off-campus …

CD 775B. Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiology II (6)

Prerequisites: CD 775A with a grade of “A” or “B”, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system, vestibular system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. CD 775B is the second off-campus …

CD 775C. Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiology III (6)

Prerequisites: CD 775B with a grade of “A” or “B”, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders associated with the auditory system, vestibular system and/or systems for processing of acoustic information. CD 775C is the third and …

CD 776A. Required Professional Experience in Audiology I (6)

Prerequisites: CD 775C with a grade of “A” or “B”, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders in hearing. CD 776A is the first within the 776 series (776A, 776B and 776C), which occurs in the final …

CD 776B. Required Professional Experience in Audiology II (6)

Prerequisites: CD 776A with a grade of “A” or “B”, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders in hearing. CD 776B is the second within the 776 series (776A, 776B and 776C), which occurs in the final …

CD 776C. Required Professional Experience in Audiology III (6)

Prerequisites: CD 776B with a grade of “A” or “B”, maintenance of clinical privileges and instructor consent. Supervised clinical experience in diagnostics, assessments, screenings and therapeutic procedures with infants, children and adults who have disorders in hearing. CD 776C is the third and last within the 776 series (776A, 776B and 776C), which occurs in …

CD 796. Directed Graduate Research in Audiology (3-3)

Prerequisites: Advancement to candidacy, advisor consent, instructor consent, maintenance of clinical privileges. Conducted clinical research under the guidance of a CDS faculty member. Students will conduct independent research as well as attend meetings with advisors and with peers within a regularly scheduled seminar. May be repeated once.

CD 797. Directed Comprehensive Studies in Audiology (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of all required academic coursework in the Doctor of Audiology program, advisor consent, instructor consent, maintenance of clinical privileges. This course includes guided preparation and review for the culminating, comprehensive examination in the Doctor of Audiology program. (Credit/No Credit only)

EOH 101. Introduction to Environmental Health (3)

Introduction to the field of Environmental and Occupational Health. Topics reflect those environmental health risks that impact our daily lives, including restaurant inspection and food safety, water and air pollution, bioterrorism, environmentally induced skin cancers, mold and indoor air quality, workplace hazards and environmental control of infectious disease. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

EOH 352. Environmental Health Policy, Law and Administration (3)

Analysis of conceptual models relative to environmental health policy, making laws and program administration. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences if required by a student’s major.)

EOH 353. Global Perspectives of Environmental Health (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Provides a perspective and framework for evaluating a broad and dynamic range of environmental issues, from bioterrorism to global warming to restaurant grading systems. This wide-ranging and topical course provides an overview of the field of Environmental and Occupational Health, including such major subject areas as environmental …

EOH 356A. Environmental Health I (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. In-depth analysis of the physical, chemical and biological influences on human health and well being.

EOH 356B. Environmental Health II (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. In-depth analysis of the physical, chemical and biological influences on human health and well being.

EOH 365. Principles of Accident Prevention (3)

Epidemiology of accident causation. Methods of prevention and control.

EOH 453. Health and Physical Aspects of Housing (3)

Preparatory: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Examines the impact of the housing environment on the public’s health and safety. Topics include home construction, electrical and plumbing systems, radon gas, lead paint, mold investigation and remediation, housing inspection and hazard assessment. Available for graduate credit with approval from …

EOH 454. Environmental Health Law (3)

Study of the major provisions of the laws that pertains to the environmental health field. Topics include Clean Air Act, Water Pollution Control Act, Noise Control Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act and Toxic Substances Control Act. Available for graduate credit with approval from the graduate coordinator. (Offered Spring semester.)

EOH 455/L. Microbiological Hazards in Environmental Health and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Corequisite: EOH 455L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Study of infectious disease agents transmitted through water, wastewater, milk, food, surfaces and air. with a focus on their assessment, prevention and control. Lecture, 3 hours. Lab: Standard procedures for basic …

EOH 456. Fundamentals of Toxicology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, BIOL 101L, BIOL 281 and BIOL 282, or BIOL 106, BIOL 106L, BIOL 107 and BIOL 107L; CHEM 101, CHEM 101L, CHEM 102 and CHEM 102L, or CHEM 103, CHEM 103L, CHEM 104 and CHEM 104L; CHEM 235. Study of the toxic agents in the working environment as they relate to interface between occupational medicine and industrial hygiene.

EOH 457. Water Supply and Sewage Disposal (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Theory and practice of water supply and sewage disposal in the public and private sectors. Available for graduate credit with approval from the graduate coordinator. (Offered Spring semester.)

EOH 458. Vector Control (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Identification and control of arthropods and other vectors of disease. Available for graduate credit with approval from the graduate coordinator. (Offered Fall semester.)

EOH 459. Hazardous Materials and Waste Management (3)

Preparatory: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L; PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Study of major aspects of the management of hazardous waste, from the time it is generated to the time it is finally disposed. Available for graduate credit with approval from the graduate coordinator.

EOH 465. Occupational Safety (3)

Study of the way that accidents and incidents occur in the occupational environment. Establishment and maintenance of safety programs are discussed. Collection, analysis and interpretation of safety data are considered. Approaches to safety used by international, national and local governmental agencies are reviewed, as well as those of insurance companies, professional societies, trade associations and …

EOH 466A. The Occupational Health Environment (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: MATH 105; PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Provides an overview of the field of occupational health, with a focus on industrial hygiene. Presents information related to the recognition, evaluation and control of the chemical, physical and environmental factors that can …

EOH 466B/L. Evaluating the Occupational Environment and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: EOH 466A. Corequisite: EOH 466BL. Preparatory: HSCI 390/L or MATH 140. Provides the skills needed to measure the levels of chemical and physical hazards in the workplace and the community. Measurement techniques, sampling strategy and industrial hazards are discussed. Lab: Provides hands on applications of industrial hygiene monitoring equipment and demonstration of basic principles …

EOH 466C. Controlling the Occupational Environment (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: MATH 105; PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Overview of design and evaluation of industrial ventilation and noise control systems used to protect the health and safety of workers. Students are provided the basic skills necessary to review drawings and specifications, …

EOH 467. Radiological Health (3)

Prerequisites: One semester of Biology; One semester of Chemistry; BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L; MATH 105. Preparatory: MATH 140 or HSCI 390; PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Comprehensive coverage of ionizing radiation with emphasis on health effects, measurement and protection. Available for graduate credit with approval from …

EOH 468. Air Pollution and Health (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Preparatory: PHYS 100A, PHYS 100AL, PHYS 100B and PHYS 100BL. Investigation of the relationship between air pollutants and their effects on plants and animals. Emphasis on understanding the health effects in human populations. Available for graduate credit with approval from the graduate coordinator. (Offered …

EOH 469. Environmental Risk Analysis (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 106 and BIOL 106L; CHEM 101 and CHEM 101L, or CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L. Examines the assessment, communication and management of environmental risks. “Environmental” concerns are limited to agents that are: (1) environmental or occupational in origin; and (2) hazardous to human health. “Risk” refers to the subjective as well as objective measurement of probabilistic events. How to recognize …

EOH 480. Research Training in Environmental and Occupational Health Science (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This course examines research in environmental and occupational health sciences. The intent is to provide the student with knowledge and skills for successful application and transition to graduate programs in environmental health science. This course may be taken up to four times. Students in the Student-to-Scientist Bridge Program in Environmental Health …

EOH 494B. Academic Internship (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Supervised internship in an official and/or voluntary health agency. Includes staffing conferences. Available for graduate credit with approval from the graduate coordinator. (Credit/No Credit only)

EOH 501A. Environmental and Occupational Health Concepts I (3)

This course provides core knowledge in the field of environmental and occupational health. Materials will focus on human health impacts, controls and legal frameworks related to the physical, chemical, and biological influences on environmental and occupational health.

EOH 501B. Environmental and Occupational Health Concepts II (3)

This course provides core knowledge of epidemiology, microbiology, and toxicology focuses on environmental and occupational health issues. The epidemiology section introduces epidemiological concepts. The microbiology section is a study of infectious disease agents with a focus on their assessment, prevention and control. The toxicology section focuses on the principles of toxicology.

EOH 553. Administration of Environmental and Occupational Health Programs (3)

Comprehensive analysis of environmental and occupational health program planning, with emphasis on program management. (Offered Fall semester.)

EOH 554. Critical Review of the Technical Literature in EOH (3)

Prerequisites: EOH 501A, EOH 501B. Critical analysis of the scientific and technical literature in various fields of Environmental and Occupational Health.

EOH 554MPH. Environmental and Occupational Health Problems (3)

Critical analysis of topics related to environmental and occupational health problems for students in the MPH program.

EOH 555. Environmental and Occupational Health Exposure Assessment (3)

Prerequisite: EOH 501A. This course explores topics and techniques related to environmental and occupational health exposure assessment.

EOH 556. Advanced Toxicology (3)

Prerequisite: EOH 554. A study of the toxicity of various chemical and physical agents to organ systems and the developing conceptus. Study of the mechanisms of action of toxic chemicals as related to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects and the application of that information to regulatory standards for the workplace and environment.

EOH 560. EOH Epidemiology (3)

Prerequisite: EOH 501B. A critical analysis of epidemiology literature related to issues in environmental and occupational health.

EOH 569. Advanced Risk Analysis (3)

Prepares the student to complete health risk assessment on exposures to environmental and occupational agents, utilize risk management decision-making models, and communicate to the public and other stakeholders the results of risk assessments and decision making.

EOH 570. Occupational Ergonomics (3)

Focus on prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) through the application of occupational ergonomics principles. Topics include the prevalence of and incidence of WRMDs, job/task analysis, postural analysis, tools and workstation design, and job design. Scientific basis of current regulations, such as California’s repetitive motion injuries regulations and guidelines such as the ACGIH’s TLV-Hand Activity …

EOH 580. Environmental and Occupational Health Sustainability (3)

Prerequisite EOH 501A. This course presents the environmental challenges that can be addressed by the implementation of sustainability practices and explores the potential- and currently-available solutions to tackle these challenges. Current sustainability programs in major areas such as energy, water, waste, chemicals and transportation are discussed.

EOH 581. Occupational Health Programs (3)

Prerequisites: EOH 501A and EOH 553. This course provides an overview of standard programs used to manage occupational health issues arising from business enterprises, including international certifications, such as ISO standards, compliance programs, standard-setting and worker training. Students will learn to recognize, assess and present key components for the development, implementation and evaluation of occupational …

EOH 582. Environmental and Occupational Health Policy Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: EOH 501A. This course explores topics and techniques related to environmental and occupational health policy analysis. Topics include policy development, implementation and analysis in local and international settings.

EOH 693A. Supervised Field Training (2)

Prerequisite: EOH 501A or instructor’s permission. Supervised action research in selected agencies or organizations. (Credit/No Credit only)

EOH 696A. Research Design (3)

Prerequisite: EOH 554. Critical consideration of research methodology as applied to environmental and occupational health.

EOH 696B. Seminar: Research Methodology (3)

Prerequisites: EOH 696A; Classified graduate standing. Analysis of research methodology and interpretation, and direct application to student-conducted independent research.

EOH 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: At least one graduate-level course. Investigation of a significant problem in the EOH field.

FCS 113. Interior Design Communication I (3)

Recommended Preparatory: ART 124A and ART 141. This course introduces students to the basic principles of three-dimensional and spatial representation and communication. Since architecture and interior design rely on representation and clear communication as a medium between the designed artifact and the built artifact, design communication is essential to relaying ideas and exploring design processes. …

FCS 114/L. Introduction to Interior Design and Lab (1/1)

Corequisite: FCS 114L. Introductory survey of interior design. 1 hour lecture, one 3-hour lab.

FCS 150/L. Apparel Construction I and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: FCS 150L. Fundamental principles and terminology of clothing construction, with emphasis on the interrelationship of fiber, fabric, construction techniques, fit and care. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab.

FCS 160. Introductory Textiles (3)

Lecture-discussion course presenting an introductory analysis of textile fibers, yarns, fabrics, dyestuffs and finishes as they relate to the selection of end-use products. Emphasis given to textiles in apparel and interiors.

FCS 170. Creative Expression in Family and Consumer Sciences (2)

Develops awareness of the relationships between creative expression and the quality of life in the family unit.

FCS 201/L. Introductory Food Science and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: FCS 201L. Introduction to the chemical, physical and nutritional properties of foods and changes that occur during processing and storage. Methods currently used in food preparation are emphasized. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab.

FCS 207. Nutrition for Life (3)

Basics of sensible and safe food choices related to the science of nutrition. Achievement and maintenance of nutritional well-being throughout life as influenced by social, cultural, economic and environmental conditions. Credit not allowed for both FCS 207 and HSCI 337. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

FCS 210. History of Interiors and Architecture I (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 113, FCS 114/L. Study of architecture and interiors from antiquity to the Victorian period.

FCS 211. Interior Design Studio I (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 113 and FCS 114/L. Foundation studio course, explores the fundamentals of interior design including the design process, principles and elements. Investigates problem-solving techniques through a variety of small-scale two and three-dimensional projects. Introduces critical thinking, analysis and communicating volumetrically. Includes creative problem-solving, process drawing, quick sketching and rendering, and model-making. Provides exposure to …

FCS 213/L. Interior Design Communication II and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisite: FCS 113. Corequisite FCS 213L. Students will use the design vocabulary learned in FCS 113 Communication I to explore design ideas. Fundamental skill development in space planning for interiors, understanding function, human factors, user experience and aesthetics. Students will be introduced to 3D modeling and visualization, Building Information Modeling (BIM), computer-aided graphics, image manipulation …

FCS 214/L. Interior Design Materials, Standards and Specifications and Lab (1/2)

Prerequisites: FCS 113, FCS 114/L, FCS 160; Corequisite: FCS 214L. Study of material applications, practices, standards and specifications used in the design and construction of interior environments including sustainability and testing. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab per week.

FCS 217. Interior Design Studio II (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 211. Interior Design Studio II builds on knowledge from FCS 211 Interior Design Studio I with three-dimensional design, developing individually defined spaces into more complex spatial organizations. An introduction to space planning, behavioral factors of space, and proxemics as they apply to the layout and planning of interior environments. This studio questions how …

FCS 232. Individual and Family Development (3)

Relationships and adjustments during the normal stages of family living.

FCS 234. The Child in the Family and Community (3)

Dynamics of children’s relationships with their families and others throughout their development and with various contexts. Lecture-discussion.

FCS 250/L. Apparel Construction II and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 150/L. Corequisite: FCS 250L. Theory and application of pattern alteration, fitting, advanced construction techniques; analysis of fabrics used in fashion apparel. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab.

FCS 255. The Fashion Industry (3)

Overview of the structure and functioning of the fashion industry as it relates to apparel. Field trips required.

FCS 256. Global Fashion Production (3)

Analysis of the U.S. fashion and textile markets within an international context. The focus is the why and the how global sourcing of fashion and textiles takes place in today’s fashion production. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

FCS 271/L. Apparel Analysis and Selection and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 170. Corequisite: FCS 271L. Study of individual differences in relation to apparel selection and design. 2 hours lecture, one 2-hour studio.

FCS 300. Family and Community Services (3)

In-depth study of various types of family service agencies (local/state/federal, nonprofit/for-profit) and the services they provide to families in the community.

FCS 301. Food Science and Technology (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 215/L; CHEM 235/L; FCS 201/L. Study of the physical and chemical changes occurring in food during commercial operations and the principles and technical process involved in the production, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of foods. Control and utilization of microorganisms in food, food laws and regulations, and the influence of processing on nutritional …

FCS 302. Food Product Development and Quality Assurance (2)

Prerequisite: FCS 301. Principles and practice of quality assurance and product development programs in food industry. Lab and field study of commercial food processing and preservation operations. 6 hours lab per week.

FCS 304. Food Service Production (2)

Prerequisite: FCS 301. Overview of the principles and methods of commercial/institutional food production, including use of food service equipment. Includes application of principles of safety and sanitation.

FCS 307. Advanced Nutrition: Macronutrients (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 281, CHEM 235/L and FCS 207: passing grade of “C” or better in each. Role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals and vitamins in human nutrition. Nutritional requirements during the various stages of life cycle.

FCS 308. Advanced Nutrition Micronutrients (3-3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 365 and CHEM 365L with a passing grade of “C” or better; Corequisite: FCS 307. The role of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals in human nutrition, including digestion, absorption, metabolism, and major biological, physiological and metabolic roles. Emphasis is placed on interactions and interrelationships of the nutrients at the organism and cellular levels.

FCS 311. Interior Design Studio III (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 217, ART 124A, ART 141, ART 230. Intermediate-level studio, focuses on systems design. Explores problem identification, research, functional analysis, programming methods and space planning theory. Investigates codes and the integration of building systems. Includes theories of circulation, systems, application of ergonomics, ADA, building codes, ceiling systems, and specifications. Typical projects may include medium-scale …

FCS 312/L. Lighting and Mechanical Systems and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 211, FCS 213/L, and FCS 214/L; Corequisite: FCS 312L. Principles of lighting and electrical systems, thermal control systems and ancillary services applied to residential and commercial design. Lab involves design of lighting systems and an understanding of mechanical systems for residential and commercial applications. 2 hours lecture, one 2-hour studio.

FCS 314/L. Building Codes, Systems and Detailing for Interior Design and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 211, FCS 213/L, FCS 214/L. Corequisite: FCS 314L. Students are introduced to basic elements of construction and building systems, including power distribution systems, mechanical systems, energy management, ceiling systems, flooring systems and the impact of local building codes on the interior design process. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between interior design ideas …

FCS 315. Issues in Housing (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Examines current issues and problems in housing and their impact on individuals and families. Concepts from Family and Consumer Sciences, law, economics, design, government, and the natural and social sciences are applied to the housing situation in an effort to explore problems and develop strategies for coping …

FCS 316. Interior Design Communication III (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 213/L and ART 124A. Students will use the design vocabulary learned in FCS 213/L Communication II to explore design ideas. Fundamental skill development in space planning for interiors, understanding function, human factors, user experience and aesthetics. Students will be introduced to 3D modeling and visualization, BIM, computer-aided graphics, image manipulation and digital media processes. …

FCS 317. Interior Design Studio IV (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 311. An advanced studio that focuses on problem-solving skills related to collaborative design. The course further develops concept writing, process drawing, space planning, design development, detailing and green design understanding. Typical projects may include medium-scale healthcare and socially conscious design/service-based learning for nonprofits. The studio elaborates on group dynamics, conflict resolution and effective …

FCS 320. Family Resource Management (3)

Management theory applied to the family. Emphasis on clarifying values, setting goals, decision making and allocating resources as they relate to individual and family choice across the lifespan. Such skills as communication, time management, team building and stress management are developed.

FCS 321/L. Contemporary Issues in Foods and Nutrition, and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 207 or HSCI 337. Corequisite: FCS 321L. Examination of contemporary nutrition and food education issues. Analysis, discussion and evaluation of physiological, economic, environmental and cultural factors as they apply to food management plans and healthy nutrition choices for individuals, groups and families. Computers are used to evaluate the nutritional value and economics of …

FCS 322/L. Equipment I and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: FCS 322L. Principles of electricity and gas; materials, physical structures, safety and economic factors of household appliances; use and care of appliances; and kitchen planning. 2 hours lecture; one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 323. Family and Individual Money Management (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Management decisions related to the allocation of family income during various stages in the family cycle. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning or E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

FCS 324. Consumer Rights, Issues, and Problems (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the Lower Division writing requirement. Economic principles as they apply to consumer situations, and the consumer’s relation to the American and world economy. An emphasis is placed on consumer rights and responsibilities, consumer fraud and protection, and decision making in the marketplace. The roles and responsibilities of public and private consumer protection …

FCS 330. Child Growth and Development I (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Principles of child growth and development. Observation of group activities involving children. Additional hours as assigned or arranged. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

FCS 335. Prenatal and Infant Development (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of development in the physical, motor, intellectual, social and emotional areas, and constitutional and environmental factors that influence the direction and scope of development.

FCS 340. Marriage and Family Relations (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships of courtship, marriage and family living, and the importance of these relationships in solving current issues concerning the quality of family life. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences or E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

FCS 352. History of Textiles and Apparel (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of the historical development of modern dress.

FCS 354. Functional Fashion (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of fashion products for their function and performance for all ages. Research and problem solving in a specialized area of fashion design, such as fashion products which provide easy access dressing solutions for independent and assisted dressing.

FCS 356/L. Analysis and Evaluation of Apparel Quality and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 160. Corequisite: FCS 356L. Analysis of the quality of design, materials and construction techniques used in commercially produced apparel and accessories. Comparison of manufacturing processes, concepts of sizing, and principles of fit and pricing in relation to the target consumer in various markets. 2 hours lecture, one 2-hour activity per week.

FCS 357. Apparel and Human Behavior (3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intercultural study of dress in relation to personal characteristics and societal patterns. The course will explore historic and contemporary issues in apparel consumption and apparel behavior in diverse cultures and their relationship to social, psychological, and economic and social equity. Students who have taken …

FCS 360/L. Textiles and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 160. Corequisite: FCS 360L. Sources and properties of textile fibers, fabric characteristics as related to selection, use and care. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 371/L. Apparel Design: Flat Pattern and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 150. Corequisite: FCS 371L. Principles of flat pattern design and their application in patternmaking. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 380. Family and Consumer Sciences Foundations and Research (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Historical and philosophical background, current issues and analysis of research in the field of Family and Consumer Sciences.

FCS 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)

Experimental courses in Family and Consumer Sciences with course content to be determined.

FCS 401/L. Food Chemistry and Analysis and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 301. Corequisite: FCS 401L. Structure and properties of basic food constituents and their chemical and biochemical changes that influence the texture, color, flavor, odor, stability and nutritional quality of foods. Evaluation and interpretation of recent findings in food research. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 402. Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 308 with a passing grade of “C” or better. This is the first in a 2-course sequence in medical nutrition therapy, and includes assessment of nutritional status, nutrition care process, nutritional genomics, pathophysiology, and medical and nutritional management through the lifespan for gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, cancer, neurologic disorders, …

FCS 403. Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 402. This course is a continuation of FCS 402—Medical Nutrition Therapy I, and includes pathophysiology, medical and nutritional management through the lifespan for neurological, renal, hepatic, pulmonary, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, in addition to sepsis and trauma, HIV, cancer, and food allergies and intolerance.

FCS 404/L. Food Service System Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 321/L. Pre/Corequisite: FCS 304; Corequisite: FCS 404L. Systems approach to managing a food service facility, including organization management, marketing, procurement, distribution, and financial and human resource management. May be repeated once for credit.

FCS 408. Community Nutrition (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 307; SED 525HE. Community nutrition studies the nutrition programs that relate the science of nutrition to the improvement, maintenance and promotion of the health status of individuals and groups, including those from different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Community organization, program planning, funding and evaluation of nutrition methods and current issues are studied. Some …

FCS 409. Geriatric Nutrition (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of FCS 207 or HSCI 337 with a grade of “C” or better, or consent of the instructor. Special problems of the aging population with regard to nutrient requirements, food use and selection, as well as government intervention programs related to nutrition. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 410. History of Interiors and Architecture II (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 210, FCS 311, ART 315. The study of architecture and interiors from post-Victorian to the present.

FCS 411. Interior Design Studio V (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 317. Advanced studio. This course develops programming and client issues through complex topics with professional documentation, a focus on green design and advanced problem solving. Typical projects may include competition scenarios from varied sources. 6 hours of studio per week.

FCS 412. Organization of Interior Design Practice (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 210, FCS 311, ART 315. Focus on current concepts and activities of professional practice, including professional roles, managerial practices, service delivery systems and ethics. Review and synthesis of research and professional literature pertinent to the practice of interior design. Some portions of this course are taught online.

FCS 413/L. Construction Documents and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 213/L. Graphic conventions and the organization of working drawings are studied through a comprehensive project. A brief survey of the legal nature and scope of the construction document package (contractual agreements, conditions, drawings, modifications and specifications) is presented. 5 hours per week.

FCS 414. Senior Comprehensive Interior Design Studio (3-3)

Prerequisites: FCS 210, FCS 311, FCS 312/L, FCS 314/L, FCS 316, FCS 411. Advanced study in interior design, with emphasis on application of theoretical concepts to specialized interior settings. Students are required to conceptualize and generate the interior design for a particular setting, including the graphic presentation of the design solution. 9 hours of studio …

FCS 420. Critical Issues in Family Resource Management (3)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. Application of management theory and concepts to managing families, with emphasis on case study analyses, personal examination and problem solving. Issues include conflict resolution, balancing work and family, and working with at-risk families. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 422. Family Financial Counseling (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 323 or instructor consent. Exploration of the components of financial counseling with a focus on counseling strategies, the communication process and listening skills. Students will examine problem solving and intervention strategies as they relate to budgeting, debt reduction, collection policies and practices, bankruptcy and government assistance programs. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 423. Analysis of Family Economic Issues (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 323. A study of family financial management as affected by the economic, political and social environments. Analysis of public policy as it relates to retirement, healthcare, housing and poverty. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 424. Resource Management for the Elderly (3)

Concentrates on allocation of resources during the late phases of the family life cycle. Attention is given to retirement planning and alternative lifestyles for the aging and elderly. Government, community and private resources are analyzed relative to benefits useful to this age group. Non-majors taking this course for the Certificate Program for Service to the …

FCS 426. Issues of Contemporary and Future Families (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 232 or FCS 330 or FCS 340, or senior or graduate standing. Focuses on current trends in home and family life and the impact that these issues have on future generations. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 427. Consumer Advocacy and Education (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 324. Concepts of consumer advocacy and protection with emphasis on educating consumer and analysis of strategies for resolving consumer conflicts. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 428. Corporate Consumer Affairs (3)

Prerequisites: BLAW 280; ENGL 205; FCS 324. A capstone course in Customer Relations Management (CRM). The course specializes in customer care and customer relations management. Emphasis is placed on CRM technology, communication systems and regulations. Product recalls and safety issues are covered in-depth. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 429. Family and Consumer Public Policy (3)

Prerequisites: Passing score on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (WPE). Exploration of the reciprocal influences between families and consumer functioning and public policies at the local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis is placed on the process of policy formation, implementation, evaluation and advocacy from a family and consumer perspective. The course is available for …

FCS 431. Child and Family Assessment (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: FCS 330 or FCS 335, or PSY 313. Application of human developmental theories to the assessment of children and families. Students also participate in a lab experience at the Child and Family Studies Laboratory. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 431L. Child and Family Assessment Lab (1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: FCS 330 or FCS 335, or PSY 313. Application of child and family assessments in the Child and Family Studies Laboratory. Available for graduate credit. 3 hours per week.

FCS 432. Family Theories (3)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. Preparatory: FCS 340. Review of theoretical and philosophical perspectives used in the study of families, including assumptions, values, propositions and applications. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 433. Administration of Children’s Programs (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 330 or FCS 335, or PSY 313. Administrative philosophy and functions of children’s programs. Staff organization, program management and facilities planning appropriate to the developmental needs of the child and family. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 434. Supervision of Child Development Personnel (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 433; Restricted to seniors. Seminar on issues and approaches to leading and supervising individuals/teams in settings involving young children. Required for Child Development Master Teacher, Site Supervisor and Program Director Permits. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 435. Advanced Topics in Administration of Children’s Programs (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 433; Admission restricted to seniors. Seminar on trends, issues and new developments in administering programs for children and families. Required for Child Development Master Teacher, Site Supervisor and Program Director Permits. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 436. Parental Development (3)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. Preparatory: FCS 330 or FCS 335, or PSY 313. Study of the parent’s role as a facilitator, emphasizing different parenting styles and their effects, as well as appropriate parent and child interactions. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 438. Adolescents in the Family Context (3)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. Preparatory: FCS 330 or FCS 335, or PSY 313. Developmental changes and challenges of adolescents and their families as they deal with current societal issues (e.g., autonomy sexuality, parent-adolescent communication, values), in particular pregnancy and adolescents as parents. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 441. Human Sexuality (3)

Provides biological, sociological and psychological aspects of human sexuality. Principles of sexual therapy. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 453/L. Fashion Promotion and Visual Merchandising and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: FCS 255 or graduate standing. Corequisite: FCS 453L. Study of principles in fashion promotion and visual presentation for commercial purposes. Lab involves fashion retail store analysis and window display projects for applications of the principles. 2 hours lecture and one 3-hour lab per week. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 455/L. Fashion Merchandising and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 255; MKT 443; Senior or graduate status. Corequisite: FCS 455L. In-depth study and application of the concepts and activities involved in the merchandising of fashion goods from producer to consumer. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 460/L. Textile Product Analysis and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 255; Senior or graduate status. Corequisite: FCS 460L. Analysis of principles and procedures used in the production and evaluation of textile products. Impact of U.S. and international trade policies and regulations. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, one 2-hour lab per week.

FCS 471/L. Apparel Design: Draping and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 150/L and FCS 250/L. Corequisite: FCS 471L. Fundamental principles and techniques of designing clothing by the draping method. Theory of design as applied to draping. Emphasis placed on the interrelation of fabrics, design and form. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 472/L. Apparel Design: Computer Aided Design and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 371/L. Corequisite: FCS 472L. Exploration of computer-aided apparel design software applications using the theoretical concepts of apparel design. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per week.

FCS 475/L. Fashion Development and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: FCS 170, FCS 255, FCS 271/L; Senior or graduate standing. Corequisite: FCS 475L. Fashion products from conception through wholesale distribution. Existing and potential markets, sources of inspiration, procurement of materials, manufacturing technology, costing, production scheduling, pricing, merchandising, promotion and distribution at the wholesale level. Available for graduate credit. 2 hours lecture, one 3-hour lab per …

FCS 476. Studio Problems in Apparel Design (3-3)

Prerequisites: FCS 371/L, FCS 471/L; Senior or graduate status. Advanced study in apparel design and production, with emphasis on application of theoretical concepts to specialized apparel. Students are required to design, produce and present a design portfolio and a line of apparel. Available for graduate credit. 9 hours of studio per week. May be repeated …

FCS 480. The Helping Professional (3)

Designed to facilitate the self-exploration, skills building and knowledge of future helping professionals. Students are challenged to enhance their knowledge of the helping professions while understanding the various career paths that are available. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 485. Family Resiliency (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 150 or FCS 232 or FCS 234 or FCS 330 or FCS 340 or senior or graduate status. Application of family resiliency theory to societal issues with an emphasis on family protective factors and family adaptation. Available for graduate credit.

FCS 491A-C. Family and Consumer Sciences Projects (1-3)

Prerequisites: Instructor consent. Individual supervised projects involving utilization of the facilities and personnel of the Child and Family Studies Laboratory.

FCS 494. Academic Internship (2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent and senior standing. Corequisite: FCS 494I. This academic internship course provides supervised, practical learning experiences focused on the application of concepts learned throughout the academic program/option. Specific guidelines for field experience and assignments vary by option. **Note additional prerequisites: Students in the Interior Design option must complete FCS 311, FCS 312/L, FCS 314/L …

FCS 494I. Academic Internship Evaluation (1)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent and senior standing. Corequisite: FCS 494. This field-based course allows for application in a professional setting and student reflection. Individualized learning outcomes are evaluated via observation, participation, reflection, journal/portfolio contents, self-evaluation and supervisor evaluations. Specific guidelines for field experience and assignments vary by option. **Note additional prerequisites: Students in the Interior Design option …

FCS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)

Prerequisites: Senior status; Instructor consent. Experimental courses in areas of Family and Consumer Sciences.

FCS 497. Fashion Show Production (3)

Prerequisites: FCS 255 and instructor permission. This course is a study of the directing and coordinating of fashion promotions, the functions of the fashion coordinators, and the techniques and procedures for presenting fashion shows. The techniques will be developed through research and various components used by merchandisers and designers, culminating with a successful annual fashion …

FCS 501. Advanced Food Chemistry and Analysis I (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 365L; FCS 401. Methods of modern analytical techniques and instruments used in food and nutrient analysis.

FCS 505. Nutrient and Drug Interactions (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Study of metabolic interaction between nutrients and drugs. Emphasis on drug-induced physiological and chemical alterations affecting appetite regulation, absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion of nutrients.

FCS 506. Readings in Human Nutrition (3)

Prerequisite: Available for graduate students in Human Nutrition only or by instructor consent. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth analysis of theoretical, methodological and professional issues in the field of human nutrition. The specific focus within the field of human nutrition for this course could include a variety of topics, such as …

FCS 535. Theories and Applications in Apparel Design and Merchandising (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor consent. This course examines historical, sociological, psychological, marketing and economic theories in fashion design. Students will apply theories to practice and research in apparel design and merchandising and consumer behavior.

FCS 542. Theories of Family Development (3)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. In-depth study of family development theories and research presented, evaluated and applied to specific family situations. Students research family theories and present and lead discussions about their findings to the class.

FCS 543. Intergenerational Caregiving (3)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. Comprehensive study and analysis of the history, multicultural issues, research, academic and professional competencies required to establish, direct, teach and/or evaluate a quality intergenerational program for children and the elderly of varying abilities, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds.

FCS 555. Textiles and Apparel in the Global Economy (3)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. Analysis of the U.S. textile and apparel complex, and of the U.S. market within an international context.

FCS 570. Practicum in Nutrition Therapy (3-3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dietetic Internship and instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: FCS 573. The supervised practice hours are a minimum of 424 hours but can increase depending on the students designated placement. Supervised practices are at selected clinical settings, such as hospitals, stressing application of pathophysiology and related medical sciences to treatment and nutrition care. Course …

FCS 571. Practicum in Food Service Systems Management (3-3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dietetic Internship and instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: FCS 573. A minimum of 240 hours of supervised practice are served at selected hospitals and school foodservice settings. Interns practice food service production, management and administration. Course may be taken twice.

FCS 572. Practicum in Community Nutrition (3-3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dietetic Internship and instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: FCS 573. The supervised practice hours are a minimum of 424 hours but can increase depending on the students designated placement. Supervised practices are at selected community settings, mainly outpatient clinics, stressing the planning, delivery and evaluation of preventive health services, as well as the delivery …

FCS 573. Seminar for Dietetic Interns (3-3)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dietetic Internship and instructor consent. Recommended Corequisites: FCS 570, FCS 571, and/or FCS 572.  Lectures, group discussions and presentations on the process of providing food and nutrition services in clinical, food-service and community settings. Interns are considered part of the Greater Los Angeles Dietetics Internship Consortium and attend seminars with interns …

FCS 575. Textile Technology for Apparel Design and Merchandising (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The course focuses on critical analysis, application, and evaluation of textile technologies as they apply to design and merchandising in the apparel industry.

FCS 580. The Family and Consumer Sciences Profession (3)

A study of Family Consumer Sciences (FCS) as a profession, including its vision and mission, history, theoretical framework and professional and ethical standards. Applications of the Human Ecological Theory to one’s Area of study is examined. Course is required for graduate students who do not have a FCS undergraduate degree. Credit does not count toward …

FCS 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Family and Consumer Sciences (1-3)

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. Selected topics in the area of Family and Consumer Sciences.

FCS 601. Food and Nutrition Policies and Regulations (3)

Prerequisite: Available for graduate students in Human Nutrition only or by instructor consent. Seminar on food and nutrition policy and programs domestically and globally. In-depth analyses of professional practice-, community- and population-based approaches to prevent or reduce problems of chronic disease as they relate to food and nutrition. The seminar will familiarize and engage students in …

FCS 605. Ethics and Social Justice in Human Nutrition (3)

Advanced discussion of the history and practice of research and professional ethics, with a focus on human nutrition. Application of theories in shaping ethical reasoning and exploration of social justice within the context of nutrigenomics and public health nutrition, genetically modified organisms, biodiversity and hunger, climate change and nutrition security, and sustainability and food security. …

FCS 606. Vitamin and Mineral Metabolism (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Recent advances in the roles of vitamins and minerals in human nutrition.

FCS 607. Carbohydrate, Lipid and Protein Metabolism (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Recent advances in roles of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins in human nutrition.

FCS 608. Sports Nutrition (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Overview of nutrient use in exercise and nutrition strategies to improve exercise/athletic performance, emphasizing current research. Topics include fuel use during exercise, nutrient requirements for optimal performance, behavioral strategies for improving dietary habits, and supplements.

FCS 609. Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics (3)

Review and advanced discussion of the relationship between nutrition molecules, genetics and polymorphisms (variation), and biological systems with specific attention to etiologic aspects of chronic disease. Students will appraise the application of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics in chronic disease treatment, prevention and health promotion, at the individual and population levels.

FCS 623. Family Financial Issues (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Advanced study in family financial issues. The focus of this course is the financial well-being of families. Emphasis is given to challenges facing families in the current economy (e.g. recession, high unemployment, foreclosures, and poverty) as well as the normative (e.g. marriage, birth of a child) and non-normative events (such as divorce, disaster, …

FCS 640. Family Strengths (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Preparatory: FCS 542. Study of the family system, focusing on the resiliency, coping strategies, support systems and other factors that contribute to the strength and durability of the family unit.

FCS 681. Research Methods (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Review and critique of published research, examination of research methodology in Family and Consumer Sciences, and selection and utilization of research tools and techniques.

FCS 682. Research Applications (3)

Prerequisite: FCS 681. Development of research proposals, completion of mini-research project, and practice in the application of selected research strategies and methodologies.

FCS 685. Decision Making in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The course focuses on research and application of decision making in family and consumer sciences. Emphases are on review, evaluation, and application of theories, concepts, and principles applicable to economic, psychological, and cultural aspects of family and consumer decision making and behavior.

FCS 686. Current Issues in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)

Students will analyze current issues relevant to Family and Consumer Sciences and apply relevant theories in Family and Consumer Sciences and related fields to advance understanding of these issues. They will further combine elements in the Family and Consumer Sciences’ body of knowledge to propose solutions to local and global issues. This course is available …

FCS 690A-M. Seminar: Advances in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Advanced study in Family and Consumer Sciences subject matter areas. Course Title FCS 690A Nutrition FCS 690B Food Science FCS 690C Family Economics FCS 690I Child Development (course may be repeated once) FCS 690J Family Relations FCS 690K Consumer Economics FCS 690M Special Issues in Family and Consumer Sciences

FCS 694A-C. Supervised Field Study (1-3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Approval of advisor. Direct field experience in selected area of Family and Consumer Sciences related to business, industry, nutrition and dietetic areas, and public service agencies. Written reports required include submission of a journal of activities performed during the semester, a scholarly research paper and presentation based on current theory and concepts …

FCS 696C. Directed Graduate Research (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Approval of advisor. Investigation of a significant individual research problem.

FCS 697C. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Classified status. For students who have completed all course requirements (30 units) for the master’s degree and for those graduate students electing to take comprehensive examinations.

FCS 698C. Thesis/Project (3)

Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; Approval of advisor. Preparation of thesis or completion of project for the Master of Science degree.

FCS 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HHD 185. Public Health for Social Justice (1)

Using a holistic and personalized approach, students will (a) explore actively the structural and personal factors that contribute to health disparities, (b) link social justice themes to health and (c) explore careers in health research and activism. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

HHD 501. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Aging (3)

Prerequisites: Baccalaureate degree in health or human services or equivalent. This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the fundamental principles, theories, issues and concepts in the field of gerontology. The interdisciplinary emphasis derives from the fact that to understand aging we must consider facts and explanations from a wide array of fields. Social gerontology integrates …

HHD 502. Aging Policies and Programs (3)

Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree in health or human services or equivalent. This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the policy process, the politics of aging and an opportunity to explore selected aging policy issues in-depth. The content focus is on a few areas that provide fertile ground for policy development and/or analysis and …

HHD 503. Gerontology Program Development (3)

Prerequisites: Baccalaureate degree in health or human services or equivalent. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course critically examines a variety of issues relating to the administration, development and evaluation of gerontology programs and services for diverse populations of older adults and their families. Topics covered include leadership, organizational planning, ethics in human services, fiscal management, …

HHD 504. Current Issues in Aging (3)

Prerequisites: Baccalaureate degree in health or human services or equivalent. This interdisciplinary course addresses selected topics in aging presented at an advanced level. Preference is given to current topics considered key for gerontology professionals. Possible topics include emerging issues in diversity, gender, nutrition, consumer affairs, physical fitness and mental health.

HHD 513. Leadership/Professional Competencies for Health and Human Development Disciplines (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Seminar in which special emphasis is placed on leadership competencies needed by the future leaders in the health and human development professions. An interdisciplinary approach is taken. Topics to be discussed include leadership skills, financial management, evidence-based management practices, strategic planning, ethics and how to create a culturally competent workplace/organization. In addition, a …

HSCI 131. Health and Society (3)

Analysis of major health problems affecting the life of an individual, the family and community-at-large. Evaluation, planning and implementation of approaches to meeting personal and societal health needs. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

HSCI 132. History of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (3)

Historical development of the disease processes, concepts and the institutions concerned with public health. (Available for General Education, D1 Social Sciences.)

HSCI 170. Emergency Health Procedures (2)

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to serve as a non-traditional first responder in a variety of settings. Topics include: basic life support, medical documentation, medical terminology, occupational safety and security for health professionals, professional ethics for health professionals, and universal safety precautions and infections control. Additionally, the American Red Cross …

HSCI 181. Medical Imaging Sciences I (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Technology Program or instructor consent. Introduction to the role of the radiologic technologist. Study of the function and manipulation of equipment and technical factors used in the production of X-ray and in imaging systems used within radiology. Includes a progressive series of radiographic exercises in preparation for clinical experiences. (Offered …

HSCI 182. Medical Imaging Sciences II (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 181, HSCI 280, HSCI 285, PHYS 376 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 281. Study of imaging modalities and equipment utilized in radiology. Includes a progressive series of exercises involving radiation protection procedures, problem-solving techniques and quality assurance programs to be used during clinical education. Considers the manipulation and use of body section radiography, phototiming, …

HSCI 231. Women and Health (3)

Study of factors affecting health and women in our society. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

HSCI 280. Radiological Sciences: Clinical Education I (2)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Sciences Program. Corequisite: HSCI 285. Orientation and introduction to clinical education in medical radiography. At an affiliated hospital, each student participates with direct supervision in selected darkroom, clerical and basic radiographic procedures. Includes lectures in hospital organization, departmental administration and medical ethics. (Offered Fall semester.)

HSCI 281. Radiological Sciences: Clinical Education II (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 181, HSCI 280, HSCI 285, PHYS 376 or ARRT Certification. Corequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 286, HSCI 385. Clinical participation in the radiology department of an affiliated hospital. Includes patient positioning, manipulation of exposure factors, film analysis and methods of patient care. (Offered Spring semester.)

HSCI 282. Radiological Sciences: Clinical Education III (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 281, HSCI 286, HSCI 385, or ARRT Certification. Clinical participation in the radiology department of an affiliated hospital. Includes patient positioning, manipulation of exposure factors, film analysis and methods of patient care.

HSCI 283. Radiological Sciences: Clinical Education IV (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 281, HSCI 282, HSCI 286, HSCI 385, or ARRT Certification. Corequisites: HSCI 380, HSCI 384, HSCI 480, HSCI 482. Clinical participation in the radiology department of an affiliated hospital. Includes patient positioning, manipulation of exposure factors and advanced film analysis. (Offered Fall semester.)

HSCI 284. Radiological Sciences: Clinical Education V (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 283, HSCI 380, HSCI 384, HSCI 480, HSCI 482, or ARRT Certification. Corequisites: HSCI 302, HSCI 485, HSCI 487. Clinical participation in the radiology department of an affiliated hospital. Includes patient positioning, manipulation of exposure factors and advanced film analysis. (Offered Spring semester.)

HSCI 285. Radiographic Anatomy and Positioning I (4)

Prerequisites: BIOL 211, BIOL 212; Acceptance into the Radiologic Technology Program. Corequisite: HSCI 280. Comprehensive modular approach to radiographic positioning of the appendicular skeleton, vertebral column, genito-urinary tract, chest and abdomen, with emphasis on the associated anatomy, physiology and medical terminology.

HSCI 286. Radiographic Anatomy and Positioning II (4)

Prerequisites: HSCI 181, HSCI 280, HSCI 285, PHYS 376 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 281. Methodologies and elements of pediatric radiology in depth, including positioning of the skull, facial bones, paranasal sinuses, mastoids and intraoral and extraoral radiography. Continuation of advanced technical film analysis.

HSCI 302. Basic Pathophysiology (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 283, HSCI 380, HSCI 384, HSCI 480, HSCI 482, or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 284. Study of the pathogenesis and clinical picture of common disease processes that impact the self-care of individuals. Focuses on the impact of environmental, genetic and individual factors in creating or perpetuating disturbed physiology, as well as on physiological adaptive …

HSCI 312. Introduction to Health Administration (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 102 or MATH 103; SOC 150, PSY 150. Fundamentals of health administration including role integration between health administrators, health professionals and allied health personnel.

HSCI 313. Health Administration (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 312. Theory and practice of health administration in various types of health organizations.

HSCI 314. Organization and Delivery of Health Services (3)

Examines how the behavior and interaction of health system components, consumers and the diverse interest groups in our nation impact the distribution and availability of healthcare resources, impede or increase access to care, change or create health entitlements like Medicare and Medi-Cal, and change provider reimbursement mechanisms. U.S., California and Los Angeles County public and …

HSCI 331. Principles and Foundations of Health Education (3)

Prerequisite: Public Health major with junior or senior standing. Recommended Corequisite: ENGL 305 or ENGL 306. The purpose of health education is to positively influence the health behaviors with the goal of promoting health and wellness, and improving health status for individuals, populations, and communities. The course will focus on concepts essential to public health …

HSCI 335. Holistic Health (3)

Critical examination of the holistic health model and selected holistic techniques.

HSCI 336. Health Aspects of Drug Use (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In-depth analysis of the factors and problems related to the use and misuse of drugs and their effect on the health and welfare of the individual, family and society. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning or E Lifelong Learning.)

HSCI 337. Nutrition and Health (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Fundamentals of nutrition, emphasizing practices and problems related to consumer and health. Credit not allowed for both HSCI 337 and FCS 207. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning or E Lifelong Learning.)

HSCI 345. Public Health Issues (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Exploration and analysis of the issues that define public health. Economics, politics, history, theory, organization and contemporary practice methodologies are probed in light of such topics as infectious and chronic diseases, maternal and child health, drug abuse, ethnic health, mental health, nutrition, poverty and sexually transmitted infections …

HSCI 365LS. Health Science for Liberal Studies ITEP (2)

This course is designed for the Integrated Teacher Education Program (ITEP). The course focuses on how overall health and well-being affect successful learning experiences in the elementary-school child. Topics of discussion include morbidity and mortality among children, including the impact of issues such as nutrition, substance abuse, child abuse, accidents and chronic and infectious diseases. …

HSCI 369. Public Health Strategies in HIV and STI Prevention (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course examines the epidemiology of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and applies approaches used in public health prevention. Topics covered include epidemiological trends and determinants associated with HIV and STIs nationally and globally, theoretical frameworks applied in the field, interventional designs, policy considerations, and …

HSCI 380. Cross-Sectional Anatomy for Radiographers (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 281, HSCI 282, HSCI 286, HSCI 385 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 283. Introduction to cross-sectional anatomy with the use of advanced imaging techniques, including Computerized Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasonography. Includes comparisons of the various modalities in demonstrating certain anatomy.

HSCI 382. Mammography (3)

Prerequisite: California State Certificate for Radiologic Technology (CRT) or senior status in an accredited RT program. Study of breast anatomy, physiology and pathology, with an emphasis on breast cancer, risk factors and detection techniques. Additionally, mammography imaging, instrumentation requirements and mammographic techniques are emphasized. Labs in quality assurance are scheduled off site. (Offered only through …

HSCI 384. Computers in Diagnostic Imaging (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 281, HSCI 282, HSCI 286, HSCI 385 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 283. Study of state-of-the-art equipment and procedures available to radiology departments. Focuses on computer software, algorithms and digitization of imaging data. Topics prepare the student for specific computer applications in advanced imaging coursework for MRI, CT and Digital Subtraction …

HSCI 385. Quality Assurance and Evaluation of Radiology Imaging Equipment (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 181, HSCI 280, HSCI 285, PHYS 376 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 281. Study of quality assurance concepts and application for radiology departments. Includes evaluation of imaging equipment in one of the affiliated medical centers.

HSCI 386. Radiologic Sciences Clinical Education VI (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 284, HSCI 302, or ARRT Certification. Clinical participation in the radiology department of an affiliated hospital. Includes patient positioning, manipulation of exposure factors and advanced film analysis. Advanced Imaging techniques in MR, CT, IR and Cardiac Cath are included.

HSCI 387. Radiologic Sciences Clinical Education VII (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 386, or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 483A. Clinical participation in the radiology department of an affiliated hospital. Includes patient positioning, manipulation of exposure factors and advanced film analysis. Advanced Imaging techniques in MR, CT, IR and Cardiac Cath are included.

HSCI 390/L. Biostatistics and Lab (3/1)

Corequisite: HSCI 390L. Preparatory: MATH 102 or MATH 103 or MATH 105 or MATH 106 or MATH 140. Principles, theory and practice of statistical analysis in health as they apply to health planning, epidemiological research and experimental research. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

HSCI 391. Computer Application in Health Sciences (3)

Introduction to computer technology, including legal and ethical considerations and its application to health education, health research, health administration and clinical health practice. Class time is proportioned between lecture-discussion and hands-on computer practice.

HSCI 412. Medical Care Organization in the U.S. (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 314. Problems in the administration of health services from a societal perspective. Questions of equity in service availability and cost are contrasted with administrative issues. Critique of national health insurance and comparison of the recent and proposed U.S. system with health systems of other nations.

HSCI 413. Leadership and Direction in the Administration of Health Services (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 313 and HSCI 412. Lecture, discussion, demonstrations and case analyses. Introduction to the basic principles of leadership and direction for students interested in supervision and management of health programs.

HSCI 414. Health Law (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 312, HSCI 314. Overview of the legal aspects of healthcare delivery and the health administrator’s and health professional’s responsibility in the area of patient care, consumer rights and malpractice.

HSCI 415. Health Information Systems (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 412. Introduces the healthcare information systems required in the healthcare industry and develops an understanding of the scope and applications of these systems. Both clinical and administration information systems in the healthcare industry are covered. Discusses strategic and tactical information management needs of healthcare executives.

HSCI 416. Utilization of Professional and Allied Health Personnel (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 312, HSCI 412. Principles, methods and procedures in the utilization of professional and allied health personnel in health organizations.

HSCI 419. Hospital Administration (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 312, HSCI 412. Introduction to the administration, organization and evaluation of hospital services and the role of the hospital in the community health system. Topics include governance, financing, medical staff relations and other current topics.

HSCI 422. Health Services for the Elderly and the Mentally Ill (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 412. Problems in planning, financing, delivering and evaluating health services for the elderly and the mentally ill. Administrative structures and public and private delivery systems are compared and critiqued. Available for graduate credit.

HSCI 424. Health Planning (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 312, HSCI 390, HSCI 412. Emphasizes current approaches to the administration of community-wide health planning agencies and the administration of in-house facility health planning programs.

HSCI 425. Financial Planning and Reimbursement in Healthcare (3)

Prerequisites: ACCT 220 or equivalent; HSCI 312, HSCI 412. Consideration of the highly specialized application of financial planning principles and reimbursement procedures in health organizations, including government regulations and legal restraints.

HSCI 431. Health Behavior Theory (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 331; PSY 150. This course provides an understanding and application of health behavior theory and models that can be applied to behavior change, program planning, and evaluation. Students are exposed to skills and competencies necessary to understand how health behavior theories and models are used in health promotion research and practice.

HSCI 433. Counseling of Health Problems (3)

Consideration of concepts and techniques of counseling and guidance as they apply directly to the reduction of specific health problems. Available for graduate credit.

HSCI 434. Lactation Education: Prenatal and Perinatal Period (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to provide families in the community with breastfeeding education and support during the prenatal and perinatal period. Topics covered in this course include: the history of infant feeding, national and international breastfeeding promotion initiatives, careers in lactation, counseling skills, nutrition during pregnancy …

HSCI 435. Health Science for Children and Youth (3)

Examination of biological and environmental factors influencing health of children and youth, and means of solving selected health problems, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Available for graduate credit. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning—Credential candidates only.)

HSCI 436. Health Concerns of Adolescents (3)

In-depth study of the health concerns of adolescents, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Available for graduate credit. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning—Credential candidates only.)

HSCI 437. Effective Strategies and Methods for Public Health Practice (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 331. This course will provide Public Health students with the techniques to develop, select, adapt, and apply strategies to enhance health education and health promotion programs. Emphasis will be placed on the development of specific professional strategies and tools needed in health education and promotion such as cultural and health communication competencies, social …

HSCI 438. International Health (3)

Analysis of health problems in selected countries. Study of the origin, orientation and purposes of agencies functioning in this field. Available for graduate credit.

HSCI 439. Community Health Action (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 331. Basic concepts and techniques of community health action as applied to the initiation and enhancement of community health and health-related services.

HSCI 440. Family Health (3)

Health aspects of the home and the family, including health and personal qualifications for marriage, prenatal care, pregnancy, infant and maternal mortality, children’s diseases, home accidents, health plans for the family, and health problems of the older members of the family.

HSCI 441. Public Health Program Planning (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 431. Public health program planning as applied to the practice of health education in the community. This course focuses on needs assessment methods and activities, developing program goals and objectives, and utilizing theory-based strategies to develop successful programs.

HSCI 442. Health, Culture, and Diversity (3)

An in-depth analysis of how culture impacts individual and community health. Includes an exploration of how social determinants of health affect health disparities. Effective evidence-based health education strategies are presented as ways to address racial and ethnic health disparities.

HSCI 445. Program Evaluation for Health Education (3)

Prerequisites: “C-” grade or better in HSCI 441; Senior standing. This course provides instruction on program evaluation for community health programs and interventions. Emphasis is placed on community partnerships, evaluation design, methods, ethics, data analysis and report writing.

HSCI 446. Lactation Education: Postpartum Period (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 434. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to provide families in the community with breastfeeding education and support from one week postpartum and beyond. Topics covered in this course include: Causes and solutions for common breastfeeding problems, infant assessment and infant development, controversies of co-sleeping, breastfeeding techniques and devices, …

HSCI 465ELM. Teaching Health in the Elementary School Classroom (1)

Prerequisite: Restricted to College of Education Credential Students or permission of instructor. The course explores the practical application of selected instructional strategies for teaching health subjects in accordance with the California Health Framework and the California Health Standards. Instructional methods utilized include classroom discussion and problem-solving topics. Content covers health services and a safe and …

HSCI 466ADO. Health Issues of the Adolescent (1)

Prerequisite: Restricted to College of Education Credential Students or permission of instructor. The course addresses health concerns of adolescents and teens in a secondary school setting. Emphasis is placed on the role of the teacher as model and observer for students and their unique needs. Topics are in alliance with the California Health Framework and …

HSCI 478. Seminar in Current Trends (3)

Prerequisites: Senior standing; Consent of instructor. Seminar to identify and analyze current trends, issues and challenges in the healthcare industry. Subject matter varies weekly. Course contains a substantial off-site service learning component that will match students’ career objectives. Available for graduate credit.

HSCI 480. Computed Tomography (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 281, HSCI 282, HSCI 286, HSCI 385 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 283. Principles of Computed Tomography provide the Radiologic Technology student with a broad understanding of the applied physics and imaging techniques used in clinical Computed Tomography Imaging. Overviews all five generations of CT imaging. Clinical applications and processes that highlight …

HSCI 482. Angiography and Interventional Technology (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 182, HSCI 281, HSCI 282, HSCI 286, HSCI 385 or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 283. Radiographic examinations involving surgical procedures and specialized equipment. (Offered Fall semester.)

HSCI 483A. Medical Imaging Pathology (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 284, HSCI 302, or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 387. Understanding the basic principles of pathology is an essential part of the radiologic technologist’s training. Knowing how disease processes work and recognizing the radiographic appearance of specific diseases can aid the technologist in selecting proper modalities and determining the need for repeat radiographs in different …

HSCI 484A. Positron Emission Tomography: Fusion Imaging (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 380, HSCI 480, HSCI 483A, HSCI 485 and EOH 467. The Fusion Positron Emission Tomography: Fusion Imaging (PET/CT) course instructs students in the use of radioactive material through proper utilization of specialized equipment and techniques. This course prepares students to perform dose calculations, prepare radiopharmaceuticals, and discuss related quality control and quality assurance …

HSCI 485. Principles of MRI (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 283, HSCI 380, HSCI 384, HSCI 480, HSCI 482, or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 284. Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides the Radiologic Technology student with a basic understanding of the applied physics, imaging techniques and imaged anatomy/pathology used in clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical applications and processes that highlight the course content …

HSCI 486A. Seminar: Advances in Radiologic Imaging I (1-1)

Prerequisites: HSCI 181, HSCI 280, HSCI 285, PHYS 376 or ARRT Certification. Research of diagnostic, interventional or therapeutic processes being developed or used in radiologic imaging for the purpose of improving the health and/or well-being of the patient population. Students work under the guidance of the instructor to research an approved topic and to develop a …

HSCI 486B. Seminar: Advances in Radiologic Imaging II (1-1)

Prerequisites: HSCI 283, HSCI 380, HSCI 384, HSCI 480, HSCI 482, or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 284. Research of diagnostic, interventional or therapeutic processes being developed or used in radiologic imaging for the purpose of improving the health and/or well-being of the patient population. Students work under the guidance of the instructor to research an approved …

HSCI 487. Professional Development for Radiographers (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 283, HSCI 380, HSCI 384, HSCI 480, HSCI 482, or ARRT Certification. Corequisite: HSCI 284. Seminar includes discussion and application of instructional interventions used in accredited radiography programs. Discussions center on current issues and changes in practice as they apply to continuing curriculum development, the national accreditation process and patient education. Additional discussions …

HSCI 488. Epidemiology (3)

Preparatory: HSCI 390. Nature, transmission, prevention and control of disease from a public-health approach. Historical background, current problems and trends in disease control.

HSCI 494HA. Academic Internship for Health Administration (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 425 and graduating senior standing. Corequisite: HSCI 494IHA. Supervised internship and field experience within an approved agency. This course provides the academic supervision and facilitation of the corequisite on-site course (HSCI 494IHA). Health Administration majors must complete a total of 135 hours. (Credit/No Credit only)

HSCI 494IHA. Academic Internship Evaluation in Health Administration (1)

Prerequisites: HSCI 425 and graduating senior standing for Health Administration. Corequisite: HSCI 494HA. Supervised internship and field experience within an approved agency. This course provides the academic supervision and facilitation of the corequisite on-site course (HSCI 494HA). Health Administration majors must complete a total of 135 hours. (Credit/No Credit only).

HSCI 494IPH. Academic Internship Evaluation in Public Health (1)

Prerequisites: HSCI 441 and graduating senior standing. Corequisite: HSCI 494PH. Supervised internship and field experience within an approved agency. This course provides the academic supervision and facilitation of the corequisite on-site course (HSCI 494PH). 135 hours are required. (Credit/No Credit only)

HSCI 494PH. Academic Internship for Public Health (2)

Prerequisites: HSCI 441 and graduating senior standing. Corequisite: HSCI 494IPH. Supervised internship and field experience within an approved agency. This course provides the academic supervision and facilitation of the corequisite on-site course (HSCI 494IPH). Students must complete a total of 135 hours. (Credit/No Credit only)

HSCI 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Health Sciences (3)

Course content to be determined. (See subtitle in appropriate Schedule of Classes.)

HSCI 505A. Health Informatics (3)

The course prepares students of healthcare administration or similar background to lead in the field of healthcare administration informatics by providing a wide ranging exploration of topics related to informatics and health information technology in the U.S. healthcare delivery system. The course starts with the unique needs of the U.S. healthcare industry by introducing the …

HSCI 510. Systems for Health Delivery in the U.S. (3)

Introductory course describes the organization of public and private systems of care, role of governments and private healthcare systems, the evolution of health services in the U.S., and key federal and state legislation and regulation impacting provider reimbursement, healthcare entitlements, quality of care, preparation of healing arts professionals, and how healthcare organizations develop and function.

HSCI 511. Health Services Administration Theory and Practice (3)

Preparatory: Bachelor’s degree; Conditionally classified status for the master’s degree in Health Administration. Introduction to the basic historical and current theory and practice of the administration of health services organizations. Emphasis on the administrator’s role in a systems approach to assessing and responding proactively to the external forces in the health services delivery system and …

HSCI 513. Leadership in Health Administration Practice (3)

Seminar in which special emphasis is placed on the leadership skills needed in healthcare organizations. Describes basic leadership principles, reviews literature, examines factors associated with successful leadership and discusses case studies on leadership strategies used in the healthcare field. In addition, a personal assessment of leadership styles are conducted, as well as a culminating community …

HSCI 515. Seminar in Healthcare Information Management (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate status; Basic computer literacy. Investigates current status of both clinical and administrative healthcare information management systems. Topics include, emerging technology, selection of information systems, management of information, electronic medical records, the Internet’s impact on a healthcare organization’s business processes, and other current events. For MSHA, MPT, MPH and other graduate students.

HSCI 517. Health Economics and National Health Policy (3)

Application of economic theory and concepts to the analysis and formulation of both managerial decision and healthcare policy. Provides a basic introduction to the relevant technical and economic aspects of the healthcare industry and local, state and national health-policy issues.

HSCI 518. Managed Care (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 412 or graduate standing. Consideration of alternate healthcare delivery systems emphasizing the planning, development, start-up and operation of health maintenance organizations.

HSCI 521. Managerial Ethics and Healthcare Law (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Framework for analysis of legal and ethical issues in the provision of healthcare, including conceptual foundations for societal, institutional and individual dilemmas in healthcare delivery and the legal aspects of clinical and financial decision making in the administration of healthcare.

HSCI 523. Seminar in Healthcare Organization (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 510. Graduate seminar in healthcare organization examines the structure and interrelationships of health status and healthcare resources, including human resources, facilities and services. Approach is interdisciplinary and designed to provide the student with an understanding of the issues in healthcare delivery. Emphasis is placed on providers and populations within the clinical, legal, political …

HSCI 526. Global Women’s Health (3)

The course examines women’s global health within the content of health inequities.

HSCI 531. Program Planning and Evaluation (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 533. Preparatory: Graduate standing as a conditional or classified student in the MPH program. Graduate students not in the program may enroll with permission of course instructor. In-depth study of the conceptual/theoretical and practice-based methodologies of public health program planning and evaluation.

HSCI 533. Advanced Health Behavior Theory (3)

Critical analysis of theoretical issues and current methodologies related to influencing health behavior. Special emphasis will be given to the selection and application of principles to the field of public health.

HSCI 534. Lactation Education for the Healthcare Professional (3)

This course provides graduate students from various health disciplines with the opportunity to learn and apply approaches used by public health professionals to promote breastfeeding in the community. Emphasis will be given to analyzing current breastfeeding behavior using a social-ecological model of thinking. Topics covered will include: epidemiological trends in breastfeeding, health outcomes associated with …

HSCI 535. Curriculum Development in Public Health (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 531, HSCI 533 and HSCI 538. Critical analysis of curriculum development and its application in public health and community health education.

HSCI 536. Cultural Issues in Healthcare (3)

Preparatory: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Provides the health professions student with an increased understanding of the cross-cultural factors that can influence health and disease practices across a wide range of cultural groups. Using readings, classroom exercises and student-developed case studies, participants explore the cultural variables impacting the delivery of health promotion/disease prevention programs and …

HSCI 537. Principles of Communication in Public Health (3)

This course provides learners with principles, theories and methods for effective individual and community health communication strategies. Students will analyze the basic components of communication; identify persuasive communication strategies applicable to public health communication practice; and evaluate the role of communication in public health settings.

HSCI 538. Community Health Action (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 533. Comprehensive analysis of methods and techniques appropriate to community health action.

HSCI 539. Current Issues in Public Health (3)

Theory, principles and research applicable to public health. Investigation of problems of social, economic, cultural and educational origin as they apply to sound public health programs.

HSCI 540. Grantsmanship for Health and Human Development (3)

An introductory course in grant writing for graduate students. The course will focus on the fundamental characteristics of grant writing for the health and human services, including identifying sources of funding, writing a proposal narrative, developing a realistic budget, reviewing and editing proposal content, and understanding how to manage an awarded grant. The course will …

HSCI 541. Administration and Management in Public Health (3)

In-depth exploration of organizational, administrative and policy-based aspects of public health programs and systems. Students will learn principles of leadership, governance and management; and ultimately develop mediation and negotiation skills, and learn how to apply systems-thinking tools.

HSCI 569. Public Health Strategies in HIV and STI Prevention (3)

This course aims to provide advance understanding of epidemiology, determinants, preventive efforts, theoretical framework, interventional designs, policy considerations, and testing/treatment mechanisms for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV/AIDS. This course will address health disparities, social, behavioral, medical, and political correlates as well as examine the consequences of HIV/STIs through discussions, assigned readings, assignments, and guest …

HSCI 587. Seminar: Epidemiology (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 488 or graduate standing. Critical analysis of literature related to the newer concepts of epidemiology as applied to preventative medicine, healthcare management and public health.

HSCI 588. Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 587. Critical review of infectious diseases, their transmission, control, prevention and significance in the past, present and future.

HSCI 589. Epidemiology of Common Chronic Diseases I (3)

Prerequisite: HSCI 587. Selected models to evaluate, analyze and investigate risk factors related to common chronic diseases.

HSCI 591. Quantitative Demography in Public Health (3)

Preparatory: HSCI 592. Quantitative demographic methods and public access databases to study population change, fertility and mortality, marriage and cohabitation, migration patterns and other influences on population growth and health over time.

HSCI 592. Advanced Biostatistics (3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Combines data collection, design of data gathering instruments, data analysis, statistical methods and statistical reasoning for public health.

HSCI 592A. Advanced Biostatistics II (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 592 and instructor permission. Advanced techniques in statistical analysis used in epidemiologic research, including complex sampling strategies, secondary data analysis and topics in applied regression utilizing various data software packages (SAS and SPSS).

HSCI 613. Organizational Behavior and Development in Health Administration (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 513; Classified Graduate standing in Health Administration. A graduate seminar on administrative trends and issues in health services management, specifically pertaining to strategic human resources management and managing change.

HSCI 614. Health Administration: Financial Analysis and Management (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Health Administration. ACCT 220 or equivalent. Theory, analysis and application of techniques of fiscal management in selected healthcare systems, including financial statement analysis, budgeting and productivity.

HSCI 615. Data Management and Analysis for Decision Making in Healthcare (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Health Administration. Overview of data and analytics in the healthcare industry. Application of structured problem-solving tools, analysis and quantitative decision making will be used to translate data into meaningful information. Analysis will be practiced to facilitate hands-on experience working with and interpreting data.

HSCI 616. Continuous Quality Improvement in Healthcare (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Health Administration. Overview of fundamentals and tools using a systems approach to quality management and process improvement in healthcare. Use practical approaches with an exposure to real-world healthcare settings to translate tools, theory, concepts and knowledge into practice. Understand tools that managers need to know including managerial, organizational, regulatory and policy …

HSCI 618. Strategic Planning in Health Administration (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 614; HSCI 615; Classified graduate status in Health Administration. This graduate seminar is intended to integrate the various disciplines—finance, human resources, law, ethics, policy, etc.—into a comprehensive and practical framework. This course requires the student to put the acquired skills, theories and strategies into practice within the healthcare industry.

HSCI 619. Third Party Payer Impact on Health Delivery (3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status in Health Administration. Examines how third-party pay mechanisms, including traditional indemnity insurance/fee-for-service, Medicare and Medicaid, prospective payment systems, various managed care models and other forms, impact provider and consumer behavior, and risk management. Other items include, Workers Compensation, disability insurance and liability insurance for the healing arts professions, self-insured employers and …

HSCI 620. Seminar in Hospital Administration (3)

Preparatory: Graduate status in the College of Health and Human Development. Hospital organization; governance; relationship of administration to the medical staff; inpatient and outpatient services; professional staff organization; implications of changing MediCal and Medicare and private payer reimbursement; payer contracting; Title 22 and 24 requirements; licensing; make vs. buy decisions; community need and community benefit; …

HSCI 625. Integrative Seminar in Health Administration (3)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Last semester of coursework. Integrative seminar. Students apply the knowledge and analytic skills obtained from health administration courses to the solution of organization and system-wide problems in healthcare.

HSCI 693A. Supervised Field Training (2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: HSCI 693C. Supervised field experience/training in selected agencies or organizations. (Credit/No Credit only)

HSCI 693C. Supervised Field Training (1)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: HSCI 693A. Supervised field experience/training onsite in selected agencies or organizations. (Credit/No Credit only)

HSCI 694. Research Design and Methodology (3)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: HSCI 592. Principles of research design and implementation including methodology, sampling, data analysis strategies and results interpretation as applied to public health.

HSCI 695. Public Health Program Evaluation (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 533, HSCI 694 and instructor permission. Critical exploration of concepts, principles, and practices for the evaluation of public health programs. This course provides professional skills for developing, implementing and conducting evaluation plans.

HSCI 696. Advanced Epidemiologic Research Methods (3)

Prerequisites: HSCI 587, HSCI 592, HSCI 694. Critical analysis of epidemiologic study design, data analysis and causal inference in epidemiologic research.

HSCI 698C. Graduate Thesis (3)

This culminating graduate course meets the university requirement for a culminating experience by guiding students on how to prepare and write a master’s thesis. Approximately 90 minutes of independent and/or class work each week. (Credit/No Credit only)

HSCI 698E. Integrative Learning Graduate Project (3)

This culminating graduate course meets the university requirement for a culminating experience by guiding students to complete an Integrative Learning Experience (ILE). Students will complete either a resource document or research project to address core competencies as well as concentration-specific competencies. The purpose of the ILE is to synthesize the knowledge, concepts, and skills learned …

HSCI 698F. Directed Comprehensive Project (3)

This course is restricted for Online MPH students only. This culminating graduate course will guide students to complete a Directed Comprehensive Project (DCP). Students in the Online Master of Public Health program enrolled in HSCI 698F will complete a culminating project to address core MPH competencies as well as concentration-specific competencies. The purpose of the …

HSCI 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Preparatory: At least one course at the graduate level. Investigation of a significant problem in the health field.

KIN 115A. Adapted and Therapeutic Exercise (1-1-1-1)

Prerequisite: All students must complete a PAR-Q (physical activity readiness questionnaire) and obtain physician release if indicated. A special course designed for men and women unable to participate in regular activity classes. Course may be repeated for a total of 4 units of credit. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 117. Adapted Aquatic Exercise (1-1-1)

Prerequisite: All students must complete a PAR-Q (physical activity readiness questionnaire) and obtain physician release if indicated. Provides an aquatic exercise program designed for students with physical disabilities. Students develop strength, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, posture, balance and improved ambulation through the application of adapted and therapeutic aquatic exercise. Concepts of water safety, physics of aquatic …

KIN 118. Adapted Self-Defense (1-1-1)

This course is designed to provide instruction and practice in the basic techniques of attack prevention and personal defense skills for individuals with specialized needs. Each student will develop a personalized program to discover and fortify those skills that fall within her or his range. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 120/L. Arts Immersion: Dance and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Restricted to students in ITEP Freshman option. Corequisite: KIN 120L. Introductory course in study of dance as an art form. Concepts of dance are explored as a means of personal expression. Students engage in creative dance activities and multicultural and international dance forms. Students extend and integrate their knowledge of dance to all the …

KIN 123A. Archery (1)

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of target archery, emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 124A. Basketball I (1)

Development of understanding of rules, strategies and basic skills in competitive basketball. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 125A. Fitness for Life (1)

Introductory course offering a wide variety of conditioning activities (i.e., general aerobics, jogging, weight training, stretching) designed to increase the individual’s understanding of conditioning principles and level of fitness necessary for participation in sports or other conditioning activity courses. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 126A. Strength Training (1)

Designed to emphasize physical fitness, with special emphasis on muscular strength. Evaluation of individual needs and fitness programming are included. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 128. Fitness Walking (1)

Introduction to the performance of fitness walking as a lifelong activity that maintains and enhances well-being. Develop proficiency and increased knowledge about fitness walking as well as understand and implement a physical fitness program that features walking as a primary activity. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 129A. Running Conditioning I (1)

Development of skill and training methodology for intermediate, distance and cross country running. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 130A. Karate I (1)

Development of skill in basic techniques of Japanese karate, including self defense and an examination of karate history, philosophy and traditions. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 131A. Taekwondo (1)

Development of skill in basic techniques of Korean martial art, including self-defense and an examination of Taekwondo history, philosophy and traditions. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 132A. Aikido (1)

Study of the techniques and philosophy of Aikido, a Japanese martial art. Focus on control techniques, and is based on a blending of movement and intention so that what appears as a combative situation can be resolved without conflict. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 133A. Tai Chi Ch’uan (1)

Study of the philosophy and basic techniques of Tai Chi Ch’uan, with special focus on breathing, fluidity of movement and the application of the techniques to other physical disciplines. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 135A. Aerobic Dance I (1)

Exercises designed specifically for improving cardiovascular function and physical fitness through the mode of dynamic rhythmic dance movements. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 137A. Dance, Ballroom I (1)

Survey, analysis, practice and development of social dance etiquette and of proficiency in the fundamental skills of ballroom dancing.

KIN 139A. Ballet I (1)

Development of proficiency in basic ballet skills and development of understanding and appreciation for ballet as an art form. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

KIN 139B. Ballet II (1)

Prerequisite: KIN 139A. Continued study of ballet techniques with emphasis on combinations of basic skills.

KIN 141A. Jazz Dance I (1)

Development of proficiency in jazz dance techniques, skill and development of an understanding and appreciation of jazz dance as an art form.

KIN 141B. Jazz Dance II (1)

Development of intermediate jazz dance techniques, skill and development of an understanding and appreciation for jazz dance as an art form.

KIN 142A. Dance, Latin America I (1)

Development of proficiency in Latin American folk dance skills, in choreography and in performance of group dances based upon the traditional forms. Introduction to historical background of music.

KIN 142B. Dance, Latin Dance II (1)

Prerequisite: KIN 142A or instructor consent. Latin Dance II develops proficiency in Latin American popular dance skills. It focuses on typical dances from Latin American cultures, with emphasis on acquisition of intermediate level dance skills. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 143A. Hip Hop Dance Culture I (1)

Development of introductory basic level in hip hop dance culture styles, including the most current forms found in popular youth culture and understanding its socio-ethnic origins and aesthetics. Meets 2 hours per week in the studio.

KIN 143B. Hip Hop Dance Culture II (1)

Prerequisite: KIN 143A or instructor permission. Development of proficient-intermediate level skills in hip hop dance culture styles, including the most current forms found in popular youth culture and understanding its socio-ethnic origins and aesthetics. Class meets for 2 studio hours per week.

KIN 144A. Dance, Modern I (1)

Development of proficiency in modern dance technique skills and development of an understanding and appreciation for modern dance as an art form. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

KIN 147. Pilates (1)

An introduction to the Pilates method—a mind-body movement program designed to stretch, strengthen and balance the body. Exercises focus on postural symmetry, breath control, abdominal strength, spine, pelvis and shoulder stabilization, muscular flexibility, joint mobility and strengthening through the complete range of motion of all joints. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 148. Dance Conditioning and Somatic Practices (1)

Develop proficiency and increased knowledge about dance conditioning practices, with the goal to improve stability, strength and awareness. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 149. Yoga (1)

Philosophy and basic techniques of yoga. Through asanas (postures), stretches and deep breathing, flexibility and strength are developed and all systems of the body are revitalized. Deep breathing, relaxation and meditation techniques enhance overall health and improve ability to handle stress. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 151A. Personal Defense (1)

Instruction and practice in the basic techniques of anticipating, avoiding and, when necessary, protecting oneself from attack. Emphasis is on the avoidance of physical confrontation and the discouragement of an attacker.

KIN 152A. Soccer I (1)

Designed to practice performance techniques, analyze strategies and promote team play and sportsmanship in soccer. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 153. Sexual Assault Defense for Women (1)

A women’s self defense course against sexual assault. Course topics include awareness, risk reduction, avoidance, basic physical defense, aerosol defense and keychain defense. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 154. Sexual Assault Defense for Men (1)

Men’s self defense course against sexual assault. Course topics include awareness, risk reduction, avoidance, basic physical defense, aerosol defense and keychain defense. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 172. Ultimate Frisbee (1)

Development of proficiency in and increased knowledge of disc sports, with emphasis on Ultimate Frisbee, with the goal of improving physical skills, physical conditioning, agility and teamwork. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 177A. Swimming for Non-swimmers (1)

Introduction for the non-swimmer, which includes fundamental skills for basic swimming strokes, safety and survival techniques. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 178A. Swimming I (1)

Practice in performance and analysis of swimming, diving and other aquatic skills at the elementary level. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 179A. Swimming Conditioning (1)

Survey of various training methods and development of physical fitness utilizing aquatic activity. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 185A. Tennis I (1)

Development of skill in playing tennis, inclusion of etiquette, rules and techniques. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 195A. Volleyball I (1)

Development of proficiency in volleyball skills, including background, rules and strategy. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 195S. Sand Volleyball (1)

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to sand volleyball emphasizing the skills, rules, tactics and strategies used in the beach volleyball doubles game. Specific conditioning drills for sand volleyball will be incorporated to improve performance and develop overall fitness. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

KIN 196A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (1-2)

Selected activity courses with content to be determined.

KIN 200. Foundations of Kinesiology (3)

Using a holistic and integrated approach, students will actively explore the multi-faceted field of Kinesiology. Course/student outcomes will include exposure to and development of liberal learning skills, professional development, a working definition and appreciation for the field, and the initiation of a portfolio.

KIN 236/L. Introduction to Choreography Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: KIN 236L. Principles of dance composition–movement sources, rhythmic, spatial and dynamic techniques of organization, and thematic development. Composition of solo and small group dances. Lab: Lab practice in choreography. (Available for General Education, C1 Arts.)

KIN 242. Movement Forms: Basic Dance (1)

Introduction for the major student to the study of stylized dance (social, ethnic, ballet, jazz) as a human movement form. Serves as a base for continued study of the knowledge and applications of kinesiology.

KIN 250SW. Professional Activities: Swimming (1)

Prerequisite: Physical Education option students or instructor permission. This course is designed for Kinesiology majors enrolled in the Physical Education Option who possess basic swimming skills. Students enrolled in this course must be completely confident in deep water (13 feet or more). Activities may include, but not limited to, basic water safety and self-rescue skills, stroke …

KIN 271/L. Fundamental Movement, Gymnastics and Rhythms and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 200. Corequisite: KIN 271L. An introductory course in the fundamental movement patterns appropriate for the developing child in elementary physical education. This course is designed to develop competency in these fundamental movement patterns. Students will develop competency in knowledge and understanding of ways in which motor skills can be organized into developmentally appropriate progressions …

KIN 272/L. Non-traditional Games and Activities and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 200. Corequisite: KIN 272L. Students will be introduced to a variety of non-traditional games and activities that include team challenges, problem-solving activities and cooperative games. Students will actively explore the impact of non-traditional games and activities for the K-12 setting.

KIN 273/L. Analysis and Application of Games and Sport and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 200. Corequisite: KIN 273L. Course designed to facilitate enhanced performance and analysis of sport/game skills through a tactical understanding of a variety of invasion (e.g., basketball, soccer, lacrosse, football, speedball, ultimate Frisbee, hockey), net ball (e.g., volleyball, badminton, pickleball) and target games (e.g., bocce, golf, Frisbee golf).

KIN 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Kinesiology (1-3)

Selected topics in kinesiology with course content to be determined.

KIN 300. Foundations and Analysis of Human Movement (3)

Prerequisites: BIOL 211 and BIOL 212, or BIOL 212 and BIOL 213, or BIOL 383/L. Examination of anatomical and neuromechanical concepts relevant to human movement analysis and muscular control of movement. Application of functional anatomy to fundamental movements and select movement forms in exercise, sport and dance, emphasizing movement analysis across the lifespan and across a full …

KIN 303. Foundations of Sport Management (3)

This course explores topics related to sport management. This course will prepare students with knowledge and skills to understand contemporary issues in sport management in the broader sporting context with direct applicability to kinesiological settings. This course will prepare students for success within the Sport Studies option and in their careers by increasing their understanding …

KIN 304. Dance and the Child (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 120/L; Restricted to students in the ITEP Freshman option. Provides students the opportunity to revisit dance (creative, multicultural and international dance forms) and apply their knowledge of this area to working with children. Students extend and integrate their knowledge of dance to all of the visual and performing arts. Experiences include planning, teaching …

KIN 305. Historical and Philosophical Bases of Kinesiology (4)

Prerequisite: KIN 200 or 240. Survey of the historical and philosophical bases of kinesiology.

KIN 306. Socio-Psychological Aspects of Physical Activity (3)

Examination of the socio-psychological setting for physical activity, with an emphasis on social values, individual and collective behavior, and group interaction.

KIN 307. Facilities and Event Administration in the Sport Industry (3)

Explores the competencies necessary to manage and operate facilities in the sport industry from high school to elite settings. Topics include facility design, scheduling, security and supervision, housekeeping and maintenance, merchandise, risk management and insurance. Includes conceptual and technical aspects related to developing and operating competitive sport-related events.

KIN 308. Marketing and Public Relations in the Sport Industry (3)

An overview of the marketing and public relations strategies that university, semi-professional and professional sport properties use to sell their product. Topics include market research, media outreach, crisis management and fan engagement. Emphasis is given to both traditional and emerging industry practice.

KIN 309. Science and Technology in Sports (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Exploration of sports science, including how the human body functions during exercise and sports performance. Application of functional anatomy, biomechanics and neuro-motor control to fundamental movements involved in sports. Measurement and assessment of sports performance using readily available technology. (Available for General Education, B5 Scientific Inquiry and …

KIN 310. Visualization and Sport (3)

Examination of approaches for helping athletes understand, develop, and/or refine visual skills, mental skills and strategies essential for maximizing athletic performance.

KIN 311/L. Adapted Therapeutic Exercise Principles and Applications and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: KIN 311L. Lecture and laboratory courses designed to introduce principles and applications in adapted therapeutic exercise. Lab: Hands-on experiences in working with individuals with various physical disabilities are provided under clinical supervision at the Center of Achievement.

KIN 313/L. Adapted and Therapeutic Aquatic Exercise and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: KIN 313L. Lecture and lab courses designed to introduce a theoretical overview of the benefits of adapted and therapeutic aquatic exercise for individuals with physical limitations. Lab: Hands-on experiences in working with individuals with various physical disabilities are provided under clinical supervision at the Center of Achievement.

KIN 314/L. Creative Dance for Children and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: KIN 314L. Study of the elements of time, space and energy as related to children’s dance as an art form. Principles, techniques and exploration of directions of teaching dance to children. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

KIN 315/L. Analysis and Application of Multi-Cultural Dance Forms for Children and Adolescents and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 242. Corequisite: KIN 315L. Analysis of basic to intermediate skills of multi-cultural dance, including ballroom, contra, ethnic, round and square. Students develop performance analysis skills and the ability to plan and conduct instructional activities in multi-cultural dance.

KIN 316/L. Choreographic Forms and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 236. Corequisite: KIN 316L. Study of preclassic, classic, modern, dramatic and group forms, with practical application in composition of solo and group dances. Lecture and lab taken concurrently. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

KIN 317. Advanced Analysis of Dance Forms–Ballet, Jazz, Modern (3)

Analysis of basic to intermediate skills of ballet, jazz and modern dance. Organizing and conducting of dance classes, demonstrations, concerts and other special dance activities in a school setting. Students develop performance analysis skills and ability to plan and conduct instructional activities in ballet, jazz and modern dance.

KIN 318. Intermediate Classical and Contemporary Ballet Technique (3-3)

Prerequisite: KIN 139B or KIN 141 or KIN 144 or KIN 244 or KIN 496BAL or instructor consent. Recommended Preparatory: Previous formal dance training. An intermediate course for undergraduate dance specialists in classical and contemporary ballet technique. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units in different semesters. 6 studio hours.

KIN 319. Intermediate Modern Dance (3-3)

Prerequisite: KIN 139A or KIN 144A or instructor consent. An intermediate course for undergraduate dance specialists in modern dance technique. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units in different semesters. 6 studio hours.

KIN 321. Intermediate Contemporary Dance Forms (3-3)

Prerequisite: KIN 143A or KIN 144 or instructor permission. An intermediate course in urban contemporary dance. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units in different semesters. 6 studio hours.

KIN 331. Introduction to Athletic Training Clinical Experience (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. An introduction to athletic training clinical experiences and employment settings. Experiences may include observation in physician offices (with MD’s and/or athletic training physician extenders), rehabilitation clinics, during surgical procedures, and in performing arts and corporate settings. Students will also observe during pre-season practices.

KIN 332. Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. This course exposes the Athletic Training student to the process of evidence-based practice. Topics include formulating a clinical question, searching for evidence, and critical appraisal of the literature. Select topics in the Prevention and Health Promotion, Clinical Examination and Diagnosis, Acute Care of Injuries and Illnesses, and Therapeutic Interventions domains will …

KIN 333. Injury Prevention Clinical Reasoning (2)

Prerequisites: KIN 338/L; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 341. Athletic Training students will practice clinical reasoning and differential diagnosis skills via case studies while integrating knowledge and skills from injury prevention, lower extremity evaluation and rehabilitation domains.

KIN 334. Evaluation and Rehabilitation Clinical Reasoning (2)

Prerequisites: KIN 333; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 342. Athletic Training students will practice clinical reasoning and differential diagnosis skills via case studies while integrating knowledge and skills from previous coursework. Advanced functional activities/ patterns also will be analyzed.

KIN 335/L. Health Related Fitness in K-12 Physical Education and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 272 and KIN 273. Corequisite: KIN 335L. Course to facilitate physical education students’ knowledge, skills, appreciation and confidence needed to lead school-aged children in the development of active, healthy lives.

KIN 336/L. Applied Fitness Training (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 300; BIOL 281 or BIOL 383/L. Corequisite: KIN 336L. Theory and application of exercise program design and instruction to both individuals and groups within the general population. Field experience through practical application in leadership of a staff/faculty wellness class conducted during lab.

KIN 337/L. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 211 and BIOL 212, or BIOL 212 and BIOL 213, or BIOL 383/L. Corequisite: KIN 337L. An introductory course to the field of athletic training. The history of the athletic training profession, the role of the athletic trainer as part of the sports medicine team, pharmacology, nutrition, emergency management, risk management and injury assessment domains …

KIN 338/L. Lower Extremity Injury Evaluation Techniques and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 337/L. Corequisite: KIN 338L. Athletic Training students will learn how to assess various lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Injury nomenclature, the injury evaluation process and specific body parts and injuries will be covered. Lab: Athletic Training students will develop proficiency in the individual lower extremity injury assessment techniques. Related topics that will …

KIN 339/L. Upper Extremity Injury Evaluation and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 338/L. Corequisite: KIN 339L. Lecture course designed to develop Athletic Training students’ upper extremity evaluation techniques. Lab: Athletic training students will develop proficiency in the individual upper extremity injury assessment techniques.

KIN 340. Medical Documentation (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 337/L; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisites: KIN 338/L. Introduction to injury evaluation documentation via classroom instruction and observation of physicians and allied health professionals. Documentation and assessment of risk management/ injury evaluation proficiencies through practical examination.

KIN 341. Prevention and Evaluation Clinical Experience (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 338/L; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 333. Prevention and lower extremity evaluation clinical experience. Athletic Training students practice, apply and synthesize knowledge and skills from the injury prevention and lower extremity injury evaluation domains with a physically active population, under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. The required 10 …

KIN 342. Rehabilitation and Evaluation Clinical Experience (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 341; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 334. Rehabilitation and upper extremity injury evaluation clinical experience. Athletic Training students practice, apply and synthesize knowledge and skills from the rehabilitation and upper extremity injury evaluation domains with a physically active population, under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. The required 10 …

KIN 345/L. Biomechanics and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 300. Corequisite: KIN 345L. Analysis of the ways in which anatomical makeup and mechanical laws govern the mechanics of human motion. Lab experiments designed to provide practical demonstration of mechanical laws and structured learning of qualitative and quantitative procedures for analyzing human motion.

KIN 346/L. Physiology of Exercise and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: BIOL 281 or BIOL 383/L. Corequisite: KIN 346L. Effects of physical activity on the human physiological processes and of the physiological aspects of skill, endurance, fatigue, training and other phenomena related to physical performance.

KIN 347. Introduction to Adapted Physical Education (3)

Study of common disabilities and deviations in growth, development and motor function in students, including the role played by all physical educators in accommodating special needs students.

KIN 349. General Medical Conditions (2)

Prerequisite: KIN 342. Corequisite: KIN 349L. Open to Athletic Training students only. Will provide students with the knowledge to assess sensory and motor function related to spine injuries, handle crisis situations, and recognize systemic diseases in patients. Pathology of the systems of the body will be covered.

KIN 349L. General Medical Conditions Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: KIN 342. Corequisite: KIN 349. Open to Athletic Training students only. This course will provide students with the skills and clinical reasoning to assess sensory and motor function related to spine injuries, handle crisis situations, and assess systemic diseases in patients. Lab requires 3 hours of contact time per week.

KIN 371/L. Physical Education Content Development for Children and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 271/L. Not available for credit to students who have completed KIN 470/L. Content, methodology, materials and equipment central to the planning, implementation and evaluation of developmental physical activity programs for children. Lab provides observation, active participation and practical experiences in activity programs for children, with emphasis on elementary-school physical education.

KIN 377. Motor Learning (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 200. Study of principles, theories, and research evidence regarding the nature of motor performance and learning with particular emphasis on factors that impact learning a skill through practice.

KIN 380/L. Perspectives of Dance and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: KIN 380L. History, aesthetics, performance forms, musical forms, cultural and racial heritages, and contemporary directions of dance in education and art. Dance is examined as a performing art, ritual, social/recreational activity and subject for scholarly investigation and analysis. Students participate in dance techniques related to content presented …

KIN 385. Women in Sport (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of women’s past and present involvement with sport. Examines the social, cultural and developmental implications of sport participation. (Available for General Education, F Comparative Cultural Studies.)

KIN 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Kinesiology (1-3)

Experimental courses in kinesiology with course content to be determined.

KIN 405. Ethics and Kinesiology (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 305. This course examines how basic ethical theories relate to problems in kinesiology. It provides critical analysis of ethical dilemmas in contemporary sport. It also emphasizes the understanding of ethical frameworks and the application of these frameworks to ethical problems arising in other contexts related to kinesiology professions. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 406. Sport, Development, and Social Change (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 305. This class critically assesses the development of sport and the use of sport as a mechanism for social change. Students will apply critical theory to understand the efficacy of sport programs in affecting social, economic and political change. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 407. Sport, Culture and Society (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 306. Study of the role, meaning and use of American sports, from colonial times to the present. Examination of the effects of forces that influence sports in this society and the status of international sports, including the role of U.S. factors affecting sport at the international level and future directions. Available for graduate …

KIN 408. The Olympic Games (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 305. Study of sport through the perspective of the ancient and modern Olympic Games from a historical and philosophical point of view. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 409. Advanced Sport Psychology (3)

Prerequisites: Score of 8 or better on Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam; Not available to students who have taken PSY 409. Recommended Preparatory: KIN 306 and/or PSY 150. Addresses the evolution of sport psychology as a science, including the psychological variables associated with successful performance in sport and physical activity settings. Kinesiology majors receive upper division …

KIN 410. Psychosocial Aspects of Athletic Injury (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 306 or instructor consent. This course examines the psychosocial factors involved in athletic injuries and the rehabilitation process. Relevant theory and research will be discussed, as well as practical applications. Topics may include: stress, responses to injury, mental skills/tools used to manage injury (i.e., imagery, goal setting, motivation, confidence), social support, common problems …

KIN 415. Medical Aspects of Sport and Related Injuries (3)

Prerequisites: KIN 337 and KIN 345. Review of selected medical aspects of sport. Topics include injury evaluation techniques, therapeutic modalities, and rehabilitation techniques. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 417. Theoretical and Technical Aspects of Resistance Exercise (2)

Prerequisites: KIN 345/L and KIN 346/L. Corequisite: KIN 417L. A course designed to prepare students to plan, develop and implement resistance-training programs. Topics included will pertain to muscular strength and endurance conditioning, physiology of strength conditioning, muscular strength, testing and evaluation and organization/administration of strength-training programs. Students who complete this course are prepared to sit for the …

KIN 417L. Theoretical and Technical Aspects of Resistance Training Laboratory (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 345/L and KIN 346/L. Corequisite: KIN 417. A hands-on lab in which students will perform various resistance-training techniques that will pertain to muscular strength and endurance conditioning, physiology of strength conditioning, muscular strength testing and evaluation and organization/administration of strength-training programs. Students who complete this course are prepared to sit for the Certified Strength and …

KIN 418. Advanced Classical and Contemporary Ballet Technique (3-3)

Prerequisite: KIN 318 or KIN 496BAL or instructor consent. Recommended Preparatory: Previous formal dance training. A course for students interested in a dance specialty. Class is designed at the advanced-skill level in ballet technique. Available for graduate credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units in different semesters. 6 studio hours per week.

KIN 419. Advanced Modern Dance (3-3)

An advanced course for undergraduate dance specialists in modern dance technique. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units in different semesters. 6 studio hours per week. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 420. Coaching Competitive Sports (3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives of coaching are examined as these relate to motivation, discipline and interpersonal relations in competitive sports programs.

KIN 421. Advanced Contemporary Dance Forms (3-3)

Prerequisite: KIN 319 or KIN 321 or instructor permission. An advanced course in contemporary dance forms. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units in different semesters. Available for graduate credit. 6 studio hours.

KIN 426. Choreography (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 316 or instructor consent. View of dance composition, including movement sources, rhythmic spatial and dynamic techniques of organization; thematic development and dramatic intent. Composition of solo and small-group dances. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 427. Dance Production (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 316 or instructor consent. Study of techniques and materials in dance as applied to music analysis and advanced individual and group choreography for performance. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 428. Aesthetics of Human Movement (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 305. Examines historical and contemporary physical activity movement forms (such as sport, dance and exercise) and the human body as aesthetic expressions and culturally symbolic representations. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 436. Applied Exercise and Sports Physiology (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 346 with a grade of “C-” or better. Physiological conditioning concepts, including the effects of acute and chronic bouts of exercise training, for the enhancement of health objectives and improvement of sports performance. Regular written assignments required. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 437. Athletic Training Administration (3)

Prerequisites: KIN 339/L. Athletic Training students will learn techniques and strategies required to manage athletic training programs in the professional world. Professional development and acute care of injuries also will be addressed.

KIN 441. Administration and Treatment Clinical Experience (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 342; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 443. Athletic Training students practice, apply and synthesize knowledge and skills from the administrative, modalities and general medical domains with a physically active population under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. The required 20 hours per week will assimilate Athletic Training students into …

KIN 442. Advanced Clinical Experience Techniques (1)

Prerequisites: KIN 441; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 444. Athletic Training students practice, apply and synthesize knowledge and skills from the pharmacology and acute-care domains with a physically active population, under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. The required 15 hours per week assimilates Athletic Training students into the profession.

KIN 443. Advanced Activities Clinical Reasoning (2)

Prerequisites: KIN 334; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 441. Athletic Training students will develop clinical reasoning and differential diagnosis skills via case studies, while integrating knowledge and skills from injury prevention, injury evaluation, general medical, rehabilitation, modalities and administrative domains.

KIN 444. Professional Preparation (2)

Prerequisites: KIN 443; Open to Athletic Training students only. Corequisite: KIN 442. Athletic Training students will prepare for the Board of Certification Examination, become involved in the community and promote the athletic training profession through directed activities.

KIN 445. Advanced Biomechanics (3)

Prerequisites: KIN 345 with a grade of “C-” or better; PHYS 100A/AL. Evaluation and interpretation of motor skill performance on the basis of applied mechanics. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 446/L. Research in Exercise Physiology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: KIN 346 with a grade of “C-” or better. Corequisite: KIN 446L. Explores advanced theory of exercise physiology, as well as concepts and techniques of research. Lab experience provides competency in the application of biomedical instrumentation to exercise physiology research. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 451. Adapted Aquatic Therapeutic Exercise: Assessment, Evaluation and Program Design (2)

Recommended Preparatory: KIN 311/L, KIN 313/L. Corequisite: KIN 451L. This course is designed to introduce intermediate/advanced knowledge in adapted aquatic therapeutic exercise. Assessment and evaluation processes to be learned include observations, screenings and various measurement instruments for the purpose of designing exercise programs for individuals and groups with special needs. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 451L. Adapted Aquatic Therapeutic Exercise: Assessment, Evaluation and Program Design Lab (1)

Corequisite: KIN 451. Recommended Preparatory: KIN 311/L, KIN 313/L. This course is designed to introduce intermediate/advanced knowledge in adapted aquatic therapeutic exercise. Assessment and evaluation processes to be learned include observations, screenings and various measurement instruments for the purpose of designing exercise programs for individuals and groups with special needs. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 452/L. Adapted Physical Activity for Children and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: KIN 452L. Recommended Preparatory Course: KIN 477. This course is designed for students who are interested in working with children with physical and developmental disabilities. Students will learn the principles of programming and implementing adapted physical activity programs addressing the needs and providing effective supports for a child via direct service to children with …

KIN 456. Exercise Program Design (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 346 with a grade of “C-” or better. This course will examine the application of exercise guidelines for adults and children based on the standards of the American Heart Association and the American College of Sports Medicine. Additionally, this course will review field tests for determination of muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, body …

KIN 457/L. Therapeutic Modalities for Sports Medicine and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 338/L. Corequisite: KIN 457L. Laboratory experiences designed to provide competency in the application of selected therapeutic agents.

KIN 462/L. Physical Education Content Development for Adolescents and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 472/L. Corequisite: KIN 462L. Course provides Physical Education option students with early field and university-based experiences required to develop and apply a variety of physical education content for adolescents in team, individual and activity settings.

KIN 467/L. Therapeutic Exercise Techniques and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 337/L. Corequisite: KIN 467L. Students will develop therapeutic exercise techniques and begin to formulate rehabilitation plans. Lab: Laboratory experiences designed to provide proficiency in selecting appropriate therapeutic exercises to design rehabilitation programs for various orthopedic injuries.

KIN 470/L. Physical Education for Children and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: KIN 470L. Not available for credit for Kinesiology majors. Focuses on the growing/moving/learning elementary-age child and on purposes, content, procedures, materials and equipment central to elementary school physical education. Lab: Observation and lab experience in elementary school physical education.

KIN 472/L. Learner Assessment and Technology in K-12 Physical Education and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: KIN 335/L. Corequisite: KIN 472L. A conceptual and practical understanding of alternative and traditional assessment of student learning in school physical education. Emphasis will be on formal and informal assessment and technological strategies that enhance learning, assess performance, provide feedback and communicate progress.

KIN 476. Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Injury (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 345 or instructor consent. Anatomical, physiological and mechanical characteristics of human musculoskeletal tissues and their responses to mechanical loading. Detailed examination of injury mechanisms and their mechanical correlates. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 477. Motor Development (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 377 or instructor permission. Corequisite: KIN 478. Study of age-related changes in motor skills, the processes that underlie these changes, and the factors that influence them. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 478. Application of Motor Behavior Principles (2)

Corequisite: KIN 477. Course designed for students to use a lifespan perspective to demonstrate how to design, implement, and assess motor skill programs for any group of individuals regardless of age, developmental level, or movement task. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 479. Motor Control (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 377 or permission of instructor. An integration of the theoretical, psychological, and physiological components of motor control geared towards understanding how human perception ultimately influences movement. Special emphasis is placed on applying these concepts towards understanding specific sensorimotor skills from locomotion to singing, and how performance of those skills differs among certain populations …

KIN 481. Social History of Sport (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 305. This course explores topics related to the social history of sport in the United States and examines the social, cultural and political implications of sport in a broad societal context. This course will prepare students with knowledge and skills to understand historical and contemporary phenomena. This is located in the broader sporting …

KIN 484. Research Seminar in Sport Studies (3)

Prerequisite: Senior standing. A seminar on current topics in sports studies focused on honing student research skills. Students will cultivate their ability to find, integrate and analyze sources, culminating in a comprehensive research project that positions them for graduate work. Available for graduate credit.

KIN 494A-B. Academic Internship in Kinesiology (1-2)

Academic internship course. On- and off-campus study and research in selected areas of kinesiology with course content to be determined. Enrollment is limited to 6 units total in any combination of KIN 494A and KIN 494B. (See subtitle in appropriate Schedule of Classes.) (Credit/No Credit only)

KIN 494I. Academic Internship Evaluation (1-1)

Corequisite: KIN 494A or KIN 494B. Supervised on and off-campus internship to apply content and research in selected areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated once for credit. (Credit/No Credit only)

KIN 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Kinesiology (1-3)

Experimental courses in kinesiology with course content to be determined.

KIN 498WC. Dance Concert Modes (3)

Prerequisite: KIN 316 or instructor consent. Analysis and application of advanced choreographic structures to compose individual or group choreography for dance concert productions. Available to graduate students.

KIN 512. Curriculum Development and Instruction in Adapted Physical Education (3)

Prerequisites: Admission to APE Added-Authorization Program or Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Study of curriculum development and instructional principles used in organizing, implementing and instructing students with disabilities in various physical education instructional settings.

KIN 513/L. Adapted Therapeutic Exercise: Assessment and Design and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or admission to APE Added-Authorization Program or consent of instructor. Corequisite: KIN 513L. This course is designed to teach advanced knowledge and techniques in adapted therapeutic exercise. The course provides opportunities for students to integrate various aspects of kinesiology, including anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, pedagogical and socio-psychological knowledge as …

KIN 519. Seminar in Dance Science (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or instructor consent. Graduate seminar in dance science, with particular focus on the application of functional anatomy, motor learning and prevention of dance injuries as it applies to the training of dancers.

KIN 520. Seminar in Coaching the Modern Athlete (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Examines different teaching and coaching personalities, styles and communication processes as they relate to interpersonal relations, motivation, discipline, self expression, competition, cooperation and problems associated with athletic coaching for different age groups and levels of competition.

KIN 526/L. Teaching Effectiveness in Kinesiology and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Corequisite: KIN 526L. Seminar that develops knowledge and skills of teaching in kinesiology-based disciplines in higher education. Study of the research literature in pedagogy, with a primary focus on the teaching of motor activities and lab courses. Students examine instructional strategies and develop skill …

KIN 543. Dance Performance Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or instructor consent. Dance performance analysis incorporates a Graduate Concert of new choreographic works, plus active scientific research involving kinesiology as it applies to dance performance. During the course students will acquire, develop and incorporate skills necessary for creating a new work to be produced and performed in a …

KIN 560. Clinical EKG and Exercise Stress Testing (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Course in electrocardiography that includes detailed evaluation of basic EKG arrhythmias and their relationship to exercise testing and training.

KIN 575/L. Biomechanical Analysis Techniques and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Corequisite: KIN 575L. Techniques for collecting and analyzing quantitative human movement data from high-speed film, video, dynamography and electromyography, including theories supporting 3-dimensional analysis and data-smoothing methodologies. Regular writing assignments required. Lab experience provides competency in the collection and interpretation of both kinematic and …

KIN 579. Advanced Studies in Human Motor Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. An in-depth investigation into the theories, principles and research in motor development, motor learning and motor control, with emphasis on describing and explaining changes in movement patterns across the lifespan.

KIN 601. Advanced Evidence-Based Practice in Kinesiology (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the process of evidence-based practice, which involves the explicit incorporation of evidence from three sources: research evidence, practitioner knowledge and experience, and patient/client preferences. Students will develop advanced skills to effectively formulate a clinical question and then search for, critically appraise, …

KIN 602. Seminar in Current Issues in Kinesiology (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or instructor consent. Intensive study of current issues and problems in kinesiology through examination and analysis of sport and performance studies literature and research findings.

KIN 605. Research Methods and Design in Kinesiology (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Study of various types of research used in kinesiology and techniques employed in collecting, classifying, interpreting and presenting data.

KIN 606. Seminar in Social Psychology of Sport (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Advanced study of the influence of social-psychological variables as they relate to motor performance. Topics may include aggression, attitude formation and change, arousal and anxiety, achievement motivation, attribution theory, social facilitation, social reinforcement, observational learning and the competition process.

KIN 607. Seminar in Sport and Performance History (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or instructor consent. This seminar provides students with an overview of sport and performance history in the United States from the pre-colonial period to the era of globalization.

KIN 610. Quantitative Analysis of Research in Kinesiology (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Study of advanced statistical methods for quantitative analysis of research data in kinesiology, including computer analysis.

KIN 612. Qualitative Research Design in Kinesiology (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. This course will provide an intensive study of qualitative research designs through critical examination of the research literature. The course content includes an intensive review of the issues surrounding measurement, data analysis, interpretation and ethical aspects of conducting qualitative research.

KIN 617. Advanced Strength and Conditioning (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or instructor consent. This course will address current and emerging issues in strength and conditioning. Students will develop the ability to search for and critically evaluate scientific research, discuss different strength and conditioning concepts, and utilize this information for programming and reporting. The use of technology for research, measurement, …

KIN 626. Seminar in Philosophy of Sport and Performance (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology M.S. program or instructor consent. This seminar provides students with an overview of the classical and contemporary philosophic literature on sport and performance studies with an emphasis on developing philosophic reasoning, writing, and speaking skills related to the philosophy of sport and performance.

KIN 645. Seminar in Biomechanics (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Analysis of current and classical research literature related to human biomechanics. Emphasis on sport and ergonomic applications.

KIN 646. Seminar in Exercise Physiology (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Advanced human physiological variability, and potentialities and requirements for muscular activity.

KIN 647. Seminar in Adapted Physical Activity (3)

Prerequisites: KIN 605 and KIN 610. An advanced study of theory and literature regarding adapted physical activity for individuals with disabilities. This course is designed to develop in-depth knowledge by integrating the sub-disciplines of kinesiology as they relate to adapted physical activity on land and in the water. Specific topics include pedagogical, psycho-social, physiological and biomechanical aspects …

KIN 652. Seminar in Exercise Physiology of Skeletal Muscle (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Study of the physiological, anatomical, morphological and biochemical adaptations of skeletal muscle to exercise training.

KIN 679. Seminar in Motor Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Kinesiology M.S. program or consent of instructor. Study and seminar discussion of selected topics in motor behavior.

KIN 694. Advanced Internship in Adapted Physical Education (3)

Prerequisites: Preliminary Education Specialist Credential, Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential, or Preliminary Single Subject Physical Education Credential; KIN 511, KIN 512, KIN 513/L, KIN 514; APE Program director consent. Advanced teaching internship for candidates in the Adapted Physical Education Added-Authorization Program. Clinical supervision is provided through credentialed cooperating teachers/site supervisors and through analysis of videos by University …

KIN 695A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (1-3)

Prerequisite: Advisor or instructor consent. Specialized topics from a concentrated field of current interest presented at an advanced level.

KIN 696A,C. Directed Graduate Research (1,3)

Prerequisites: Classified status; graduate coordinator consent. Special graduate studies in kinesiology.

KIN 698A,C. Thesis or Graduate Project (1,3)

Prerequisites: Classified status; Thesis/Project Chair consent. May be repeated, but not more than 6 units may be included among the 30 total units required for the M.S. degree.

KIN 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Graduate coordinator consent. Consists of a project designed to meet a highly specialized graduate need. Project selected in conference with a faculty sponsor. Progress meetings are held regularly until the end of the semester.

NURS 302. Pathophysiology (3)

Prerequisite: Approval of faculty advisor. This course provides an understanding of complex pathophysiologic processes as a basis for safe and evidence-based nursing management of common disease processes across the lifespan.

NURS 303. Professional Nursing (3)

Preparatory: Admission to Nursing Program; Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Focuses on the practice of professional nursing, critical thinking, therapeutic nursing interventions, nursing process, advocacy, humanistic approach to the treatment of human beings, selected bio-psycho-social and nursing theories, spirituality, communication, information technology, role change, values, culture, and oral and written communication skills. Regular …

NURS 306. Supportive/Educative Nursing Systems (3)

Application of nursing knowledge and skills in self-care agency with individuals, families, groups, communities and populations. Content includes theories and principles of learning, teaching strategies and methodologies, teaching resources, and evaluation of instruction as applied to the development of nursing systems in the nursing process. Regular written assignments and oral presentations required.

NURS 307/L. Health Assessment and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: NURS 307L. Provides knowledge and understanding in complete assessment of individual health in using bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural concepts. Includes nursing assessment through all developmental stages. Passing grade must be earned in both NURS 307 and NURS 307L concurrently for credit in both courses. 3 hours lab per week.

NURS 308. Family Systems Nursing (3)

Prerequisites: Admission to BSN Program and NURS 303. The focus of this course is on nursing care of families. Family nursing theory and research is applied to Orem-defined units of family nursing practice individual self-care agents, dependent-care dyads and family units as wholes. Emphasis is on health/safety promotion and disease prevention, including assessment of individuals within …

NURS 310. Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 140 or equivalent. Historical, philosophical, and ethical aspects of nursing research and its relationship to nursing science, theory and practice are included. Knowledge of the research process is developed. Emphasis is on retrieving, critiquing, and synthesizing best evidence as a foundation for delivery of safe, quality, patient-centered care.

NURS 315. Pharmacology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Accelerated BSN Pathway. This course examines the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for major drug classes as they impact the individual. Assessment and management of the therapeutic and toxic effects of pharmacological interventions are emphasized.

NURS 318/L. Introduction to Professional Nursing and Lab (3/4)

Introduction to the practice of professional nursing, including critical thinking, assessment, therapeutic nursing interventions and communication. This course explores related models and theories, professional roles, nursing process and use of nursing skills to promote wellness of individuals. Bio-psycho-social-spiritual, cultural and developmental considerations included. Lab: Supervised clinical lab provides opportunities for role development and application of …

NURS 320/L. Intermediate Medical Surgical Nursing and Clinical Lab (4/3)

Prerequisite: This course is only open to students admitted to the ABSN program. Corequisite: NURS 320L. This course focuses on the care of adult and older adult patients with alterations in health. Emphasis is placed on helping patients and their families cope with alterations in body functions. Concepts of pharmacology, health promotion and education, evidence-based …

NURS 422/L. Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing and Clinical Laboratory (4/4)

Prerequisites: NURS 302, NURS 307/L, NURS 315, NURS 318/L, NURS 320/L. This course is only open to students admitted to the ABSN program. This course focuses on advanced concepts of nursing care as they relate to patients on medical-surgical units with complex, multisystem alterations in health. Emphasis is placed on implementing time management and organizational skills …

NURS 426. Nursing Systems Issues and Ethics (3-3)

Preparatory: All 300-level Nursing courses. Deals with issues arising within the community, the healthcare systems and the profession of nursing that influence patient outcomes and the development of nursing systems. Discusses ethical aspects of providing therapeutic self-care. Regular written assignments required.

NURS 427/L. Dynamics of Nursing Leadership and Leadership in Nursing Lab (3/1)

Prerequisites: All 300-level Nursing courses; NURS 426. Corequisite: NURS 427L. Focuses on the function of the professional nurse through leadership, administration and change. Presents theories of group dynamics, leadership, organizations, planned change, power and conflict as they apply in the nursing unit. Regular written assignments are required. Lab: Application through use of leadership and administration …

NURS 428/L. Community and Population Health Nursing and Lab (3/2)

Prerequisites: All 300-level Nursing courses; NURS 426. Corequisite: NURS 428L. Development of community health nursing role in disease prevention and health promotion among diverse populations in community and public health settings. Focus on population-based nursing practice, including health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention across the lifespan of diverse individuals, families, and communities. Emphasis on …

NURS 430/L. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing and Clinical Laboratory (2/1)

Focuses on the unique role of the professional nurse in assessing, promoting, maintaining, restoring and evaluating persons with actual or potential altered mental health processes. Topics include selected theories of human behavior and current knowledge of psychiatric/mental health nursing care, psychopathology, psychiatric treatment, psychopharmacology, environmental management and influences of family. Lab: Demonstration of beginning professional …

NURS 443/L. Nursing Care of Children and Clinical Lab (2/1.5)

Prerequisites: All 300-level courses in the Accelerated BSN Pathway. Corequisite: NURS 443L. Focuses on the professional nurse’s role in assessing, promoting, maintaining, restoring and evaluating the care of children with actual or potential altered health. Includes age-specific health considerations of newborns through adolescents within the interactional context of family and environment. Theories, models and concepts …

NURS 444/L. Nursing Care of Childbearing Family and Clinical Lab (2/1.5)

Prerequisites: All 300-level courses in the Accelerated BSN Pathway. Corequisite: NURS 444L. Focuses on the professional nurse’s role in the care of the multiperson unit of the child-bearing family. Emphasis is on assessment and management of the woman, baby and family during the antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum periods. Includes both healthy and pathologic processes. Lab: …

NURS 495. Advancing Professional Practice (1-1)

Prerequisites: All 300-level RN-BSN courses and passing score on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Synthesis of learning and best evidence in assessment, design, planning, implementing, and evaluating improvements in nursing practice. Emphasis on using clinical judgment, critical thinking, communications, and knowledge of research, client values/preferences. Must be taken within last RN-BSN semester(s).

NURS 498L. Clinical Intensive (2)

Prerequisites: NURS 302, NURS 307/L, NURS 315, NURS 318/L, NURS 320/L, NURS 422/L. This course is open only to students admitted to the ABSN program. This course is designed to facilitate the transition from the role of the student to the role of the practicing nurse. Students are provided the opportunity to function as a …

NURS 500. Evolving Roles of the Advanced Practice Nurse (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. This course is designed for the entry level MSN graduate student with a focus on exploring the role and leadership of the advanced practice nurse within the professional and organizational spheres. The course prepares the student to transform care environments utilizing nursing theory, cultural competency, professional values, and effective collaboration …

NURS 501. Ethics, Policy, and Legal Implications for Advanced Practice Nursing (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. This course is designed to explore the social forces and the political, ethical and economic structures that affect nursing practice and shape healthcare access, safety, quality and delivery in local, state, national and global systems. Students will examine the role of the advanced practice nurse as political activist and policy …

NURS 502. Information Management for Advanced Practice Nursing (2)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. This course provides advanced practice nursing students an overview of the management of information and data through application of computer, information and nursing practice concepts. The focus is on how information technology is employed within clinical practice, administration, education and research settings to disseminate healthcare knowledge and promote interprofessional communication …

NURS 503. Science Development, Study Design, and Statistics (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. The focus of this course is scholarly inquiry and translation of evidence into protocols and practice within the context of ethics, advocacy and patient safety. Scholarly inquiry for this course includes systemic critical analysis, evaluation, synthesis, application and integration of theoretical and empirical principles of research to generate evidence-based recommendations …

NURS 510. Pathophysiological Foundation for Advanced Practice Nursing (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. This course covers concepts in human physiology and pathophysiology that serve as foundation for advanced practice nurses in their clinical assessment, clinical diagnostic decision making and healthcare management. Alterations of various physiological systems and pathophysiology of frequently encountered health conditions across the lifespan, including special populations are reviewed. Evidence-based concepts …

NURS 511/L. Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. Corequisite: NURS 511L. This course provides knowledge of advanced health assessment of clients within the context of the advanced practice role. It builds on the knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology and health assessment skills attained in previous courses. Emphasis is on acquisition and analysis of relevant data for the development …

NURS 512. Pharmacological Foundation for Advanced Practice Nursing (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program. This course provides the knowledge and skills for clinical application of advanced pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics as it relates to common health conditions of the adolescent, adult and geriatric patient. Emphasis is on the development of therapeutic decision making in drug selection for the client based on health problems, individual variations, …

NURS 560. Theories of Teaching and Instruction in Nursing (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course focuses on examining prominent theories of teaching and models of instruction that are applicable to the classroom, nursing skill laboratory and clinical education. Theoretical approaches classified as behaviorist, social interactionist and cognitive, as well as adult learning theories, are discussed and analyzed. Evidence-based research relative to nursing education is reviewed …

NURS 561. Teaching and Learning Strategies in Nursing (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course focuses on providing mentored training in integrating evidence-based, learning-centered teaching and learning strategies. Students are teamed with faculty mentors in the classroom, skill laboratory and clinical settings to apply and implement learned teaching strategies under the direct supervision of faculty mentors. Special emphasis is made on integrating multiculturalism in teaching …

NURS 562. Curriculum Development in Nursing (3)

Prerequisites: NURS 560, NURS 561; Instructor consent. Curriculum principles and strategies that incorporate accrediting nursing bodies curricular essentials are presented. Concerns associated with associate, baccalaureate and graduate nursing degrees curricula are addressed and differentiated with reference to accrediting bodies curricular essentials requirements and with reference to certifying state regulators. Emphasis is placed on integrating the …

NURS 563. Evaluation and Assessment in Nursing Educations (3)

Prerequisites: NURS 560, NURS 561, NURS 562; Instructor consent. This course explores various theories on assessments and evaluation, and examines important theoretical, ethical and practical issues in assessment, evaluations, measurement and testing in nursing education.

NURS 664. Faculty Role Development in Nursing (3)

Prerequisites: NURS 560, NURS 562, NURS 563; Instructor consent. This course focuses on examining models of the nurse faculty role and on analyzing strategies for effective teaching, practice, scholarship and service. Leadership is examined through the lens of a system framework for effective change and transformation.

NURS 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies/Exam (1-1)

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. This course is for students in the Master of Science in Nursing program. It is designed to assess students’ ability to integrate and apply knowledge from the core areas of nursing to a specialty area. The examination serves as a culminating activity, which provides students with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and …

PT 700/L. Applied Human Anatomy and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program. Corequisite: PT 700L. This course promotes an understanding of the structural and functional organization of the human body with an emphasis on the appendicular skeleton and the neuromusculoskeletal system, including organ systems. Dissected and prosected cadavers, models and audiovisual materials are used to identify and …

PT 702/L. Applied Biomechanics for the Physical Therapist I and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 702L. Designed to explore the biomechanical and kinesiological principles underlying movement during upper extremity (UE) functional activities and exercise. Lectures will focus on the biomechanical principles underlying human movement, including muscle and tissue mechanics, muscle and joint leverage, internal and external torque production, kinematics, and kinetics as …

PT 703/L. Applied Biomechanics for the Physical Therapist II and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: PT 702/L. Corequisite: PT 703L. Designed to explore the biomechanical and kinesiological principles underlying movement of the spine and lower extremities during functional activities and exercise. Lectures will focus on applied biomechanics of the lower extremities and spine, with an emphasis on functional activities such as gait. Labs will focus on the application and …

PT 704/L. Applied Physiology and Physiological Assessment and Lab (4/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 704L. Principles of circulatory, respiratory, neuromuscular, integumentary and metabolic physiology as applied to physical therapy procedures and therapeutic exercise.

PT 706/L. Applied Neuroscience and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Program. Corequisite: PT 706L. Study of the normal structure and function of the peripheral and central nervous system as a basis for understanding clinical manifestations seen in individuals with neurologic disorders. Includes an in-depth introduction to neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology and neurophysiology.

PT 708. Pathophysiology (3)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Study of abnormal functioning of neuromusculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, integumentary, metabolic, and endocrine systems.

PT 711/L. Physical Therapy Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program. Corequisite: PT 711L. Covers basic patient handling techniques and therapeutic physical modalities. Emphasis on body mechanics, draping, positioning, bed mobility, transfer, ambulation, ambulatory aids, wheelchair mobility and fitting. Physiological and physical bases for selection and application of therapeutic physical modalities, including thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic and …

PT 712/L. Electrotherapeutics and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 712L. Clinical evidence for selection and application of electrotherapy and electrophysiologic assessment procedures commonly used in evaluation and treatment of neuromuscular and musculoskeletal disorders using physiologic and physical principles. Three major areas of electrotherapy, including pain, neuromuscular and wound management, will be …

PT 720/L. Musculoskeletal Practice Management I and Lab (3/2)

Prerequisites: PT 700/L. Corequisite: PT 720L. The first of a 3-semester course sequence focusing on the examination and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction. Emphasis is on the evaluation of and evidence-based treatment interventions for orthopaedic peripheral dysfunction and impairments.

PT 730/L. Musculoskeletal Practice Management II and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 730L. The second of a 3-semester course sequence focusing on the examination and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction. Emphasis is on the evaluation of and evidence-based treatment interventions for orthopaedic spinal dysfunction and impairment.

PT 732/L. Neurologic Practice Management I and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 732L. Physical therapy examination and management of patients/clients with neurologic system impairments and related activity limitations. Emphasis is on knowledge, choice, technical performance, interpretation of results, and clinical decision making related to sensory, motor and functional testing for patients with nervous system …

PT 733/L. Neurologic Practice Management II and Lab (2/2)

Prerequisites: PT 732/L. Corequisite: PT 733L. Advanced study of the philosophies, treatment approaches and intervention skills used for the physical therapy management of patients/clients with neurologic system dysfunction. Emphasis is on the choice and application of evidence-based treatment interventions and the development of clinical decision-making skills.

PT 734/L. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Practice Management and Lab (3/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 734L. Principles of cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology and the physical therapy evaluation and treatment of patients with these disorders. Aspects of acute care will be emphasized. Utilization of selected demonstrations, lab activities and assigned readings.

PT 740/L. Musculoskeletal Practice Management III and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisites: PT 720/L, PT 730/L. Corequisite: 740L. The third of a 3-semester course sequence focusing on the development of differential diagnosis, advanced examination and evaluation skills and therapeutic intervention strategies in the management of musculoskeletal system dysfunction. Emphasis is on critical thinking, collaborative learning in clinical decision making, evidence-based practice and service learning. Students will …

PT 742/L. Pediatric Practice Management and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 742L. Examination, evaluation, and management of pediatric populations with genetic and acquired disorders resulting in impairments in neurologic and musculoskeletal systems, cognitive dysfunction and learning disabilities. Emphasis is on developing observation skills to identify developmental delays in infants and toddlers.

PT 744. Geriatric Practice Management (2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Designed to develop the student’s ability to choose optimal interventions for the older adult by integrating the basic sciences and evidence-based application of examination, evaluation and intervention. The continuum of the elite older adult athlete to the frail older adult will be explored to …

PT 746L. Applied Therapeutic Exercise Laboratory (1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first year coursework in the DPT Program. Advanced concepts and application of therapeutic exercise to address functional limitations and to promote health, fitness and wellness. Emphasis is on therapeutic exercise as an optimal intervention to address impairments and to promote health and quality of life.

PT 750. Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Practice I (2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. An introduction to the research methods that apply to evidence-based clinical decision making in the practice of physical therapy.

PT 752A. Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Practice II (2)

Prerequisite: PT 750. Corequisite: PT 752C. This course is designed to provide the students with guidance in the appraisal of physical therapy and medical research literature in order to develop a written doctoral project to a) evaluate the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions associated with specific physical therapy and medical diagnoses by completing a systematic …

PT 752B. Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Practice III (2)

Prerequisite: PT 752A. Corequisite: PT 752C. Doctoral research project requiring the student under the guidance of faculty sponsor to answer a research question that (a) evaluate the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions associated with specific physical therapy and medical diagnoses by completing a systematic literature review or (b) provides physical therapy related research evidence by conducting …

PT 752C. Supervised Doctoral Project (1)

Prerequisite: PT 750. Corequisites: PT 752A, PT 752B. Advancement to Candidacy and consent of advisor. Researched doctoral project in an area of specialization in physical therapy under the direction of a faculty sponsor. The student will select one of the two emphases: systematic literature review and supervised research. In systematic literature review emphasis, the student will …

PT 760/L. Professional Practice I and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 760L. Introduction to the practice of physical therapy, including the APTA Code of Ethics and Standards and professional expectations. Instruction in foundational clinical skills, including subjective examination, history taking and medical record documentation for the practice of physical therapy. Theory, principles and current research applicable to patient/family education, …

PT 770. Pharmacological Interventions (2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. A study of pharmacological interventions for individuals with dysfunction of the neuromusculoskeletal, cardiovascular, pulmonary and integumentary systems.

PT 771. Lifespan Sciences (3)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Designed to promote an understanding of the relationship between principles of neurology and the development of motor skills from birth through senescence. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of perceptual-motor skills in infants and toddlers. Motor control and motor learning principles and theories will …

PT 772/L. Pathological Gait and Functional Movement Analysis and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 772L. Designed to promote an in-depth understanding of the arthrokinematic, biomechanical, kinematic and kinetic characteristics of gait and running in normal individuals, and functional movement analysis in patients/clients with disabilities and functional limitations. Both observational and instrumented gait analyses will be emphasized …

PT 773. Medical Imaging (2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Introduction to principles of imaging, including radiography, CT scans, MRI, special studies and arthrography used in diagnosing a variety of medical conditions and diseases.

PT 774. Medical Screening (2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Study of the signs and symptoms manifested by patients/clients and the process of relating them to specific medical conditions and diseases. Instruction on systematic techniques used to identify symptom patterns for the determination of a PT diagnosis. Includes screening process for referral to other …

PT 775/L. Orthotics and Prosthetics and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 775L. Designed to promote an in-depth understanding of the arthrokinematic, biomechanical, kinematic and kinetic characteristics of functional movement in patients/clients with amputations and functional loss. Students will study the biomechanical principles of upper and lower extremity orthotic and prosthetic management and apply …

PT 776/L. Movement Impairment and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 776L. This course will provide graduate students in physical therapy with an opportunity to improve their skills in evaluating, analyzing and treating patients with musculoskeletal pain using the current concept and techniques of movement system impairment (MSI). An emphasis is placed on (a) …

PT 778/L. Topics in Wellness and Prevention and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 778L. Advanced concepts and application of wellness practices in physical therapy and alternative complementary therapeutic interventions to address functional limitations and to promote health, fitness and wellness. Emphasis is on addressing overall health and quality of life.

PT 780. Professional Practice II (2)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. This course examines the role of the professional physical therapist as an administrator and manager of patient care, personnel and resources, with consideration for ethical, medical and legal implications. Various business models, reimbursement practices and organizational structures will be examined.

PT 785A-Z. Selected Topics in Physical Therapy (3)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. A seminar-discussion course centering on advanced study in subject matter areas at the doctoral level in physical therapy. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking, collaborative learning in clinical decision making, and evidence-based practice.

PT 790. Clinical Practice I (1)

Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT Program. Preparation for the students’ clinical internships. Applying the didatic skills and education to the clinical practice setting.

PT 792. Clinical Practice II (1)

Prerequisites: PT 794 and PT 794I. Preparation for the students’ clinical internships. Applying the didactic skills and education to the clinical practice setting.

PT 794. Clinical Education I (1)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 794I. Supervision and advisement by PT faculty of supervised clinical fieldwork. Student establishes learning plan and goals. Mid-term site visit by faculty. A minimum of 8 weeks in a supervised clinical experience. Summer session. A clinical education course. (Credit/No Credit only)

PT 794I. Clinical Internship I (3)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 794. Experience in evaluation, program planning and application of physical therapy procedures in a supervised clinical environment by clinical instructor. A minimum of 8 weeks in a supervised clinical experience. Summer session. A clinical education course. (Credit/No Credit only)

PT 796. Clinical Education II (2)

Prerequisites: PT 794 and PT 794I; Successful completion of all second-year coursework in the DPT Program. Supervision and advisement by PT faculty of supervised clinical fieldwork. Approximately 12 weeks in a supervised clinical experience. Summer session. A clinical education course. (Credit/No Credit only)

PT 796I. Clinical Internship II (4)

Prerequisites: PT 794 and PT 794I; Successful completion of the first two academic years in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 794I. Experience in evaluation, program planning and application of physical therapy procedures in a supervised clinical environment by clinical instructor. Approximately 12 weeks in a supervised clinical experience. Summer session. A clinical education course. (Credit/No …

PT 797. Directed Comprehensive Exam (3)

Prerequisite: Enrolled in last semester of coursework in the DPT Program. Guided preparation and review for the culminating examination. (Credit/No Credit only)

PT 798. Clinical Education III (2)

Prerequisites: PT 794 and PT 794I, PT 796 and PT 796I; Successful completion of all third-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 798I. Supervision and advisement by PT faculty of supervised clinical fieldwork. Student establishes learning plan and goal, Mid-term site visit by faculty. Approximately 12 weeks in a supervised clinical experience. Summer session. …

PT 798I. Clinical Internship III (4)

Prerequisites: PT 794 and PT 794I, PT 796 and PT 796I; Successful completion of all third-year coursework in the DPT Program. Corequisite: PT 798. Experience in evaluation, program planning and application of physical therapy procedures in a supervised clinical environment under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Approximately 12 weeks in a supervised clinical experience. …

PT 799A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-year coursework in the DPT Program. Enrollment with advisor approval only. Investigation of a significant issue related to the physical therapy field. (Credit/No Credit only)

RTM 150. Introduction to Outdoor Education in the Backcountry (1-1)

Prerequisite: Restricted to Kinesiology majors. Introduction to safe back country camping and travel, including elements of trip preparation; cross-country navigation; effects of environmental conditions of cold, heat and altitude on the human body; and nutrition and environmental hazards. Emphasis on safety, environmental awareness and minimizing environmental impact. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 151A. Backpacking (2)

Introduction to backpacking as an outdoor pursuit. Emphasis on proper use of equipment and safety of participants in the natural environment. This course is designed to give students a general overview of and experience in backpacking and spending time in the back country. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 151B. Rock Climbing and Mountaineering (2)

Basic elements of rock climbing, mountaineering and alpine travel will be examined, including climbing ethics, fitness and the physiological effects of environmental stress and work at high altitudes. Emphasis will be on safety, proper use of equipment, climbing technique and minimizing impacts on the natural environment. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 151C. Winter Mountaineering (2)

Advanced instruction in mountaineering and travel in the back country, with particular emphasis on snow and ice climbing, avalanche prediction, physical effects of high altitudes and winter camping skills. Emphasis is on technique, proper use of equipment, environmental practices and safety. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 151D. Flat-Water Boating (2)

Introduction to safe travel by kayak or canoe on lakes, rivers and oceans. Includes equipment, navigation and techniques for flat-water boating and emergency self-rescue. Emphasis will be on safety, environmental awareness and skill development. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 151F. Survival (2)

Studies in the skills essential for wilderness survival in a variety of physical environments. Includes topics of shelters, water, navigation and edible plants and animals. Emphasis on techniques with primitive technologies, environmental conservation and safety. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 151G. Challenge/Ropes Courses (2)

Introduction to the safe operation of challenge/ropes course activities for outdoor experience. Emphasis on proper use of equipment and safety of both high- and low-component challenge courses. This course is designed to give students a general overview of and experience in the practice of group challenges utilizing initiatives and high ropes elements. Arranged field trips …

RTM 151H. Caving (2)

Introduction to the safe exploration of caves and the underground environment, including cave formations and features, techniques and special hazards. Emphasis on safety techniques for horizontal and vertical caves, environmental awareness and skill development. Arranged field trips are required.

RTM 202/L. Planning Programs and Events for Recreation Experiences and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Lower division writing requirement; Corequisite: RTM 202L. Overview of the program- and event-planning processes as they relate to the provision of human and leisure services through play, recreation and leisure experiences for a variety of service recipients and settings. Lab experiences applying skills and principles addressed.

RTM 204. Introduction to Recreation Therapy (3)

Study of the nature and function of recreation in a variety of agencies and settings. Overview of the physical, cognitive, affective and social characteristics of a variety of individuals with special needs, with emphasis on planning and adapting recreation programs both in clinical and community/inclusive settings. Participation in fieldwork is required.

RTM 251. Recreation and the Natural Environment (3)

Study of recreational use of outdoor/natural areas and the trends creating changing patterns of use. Overview of human, animal and vehicular impacts on the outdoor recreation resources. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.) (IC)

RTM 265. Water Skiing and Wakeboarding (1)

Prerequisite: Basic swimming skills. Develops proficiency in water skiing skills, including wakeboarding, with an emphasis on safety and the proper use of equipment.

RTM 267/L. Sailing and Lab (1/1)

Prerequisite: Elementary swimming skills. Corequisite: RTM 267L. Development of the skills and art of sailing, including the development of basic seamanship, small boat handling competency, safety procedures and regulations and introductions to competitive sailing and ocean cruising. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab per week.

RTM 278. Recreation and Leisure in Contemporary Society (3)

Investigation of the contributions of play, leisure and recreation to the social, psychological and economic well-being of individuals and groups, incorporating local, regional, national and international perspectives. Regular written assignments are required. Recreation and Tourism major requirement. (Available for General Education, E Lifelong Learning.)

RTM 280. Organizing Campus Recreation and Sport (3)

Overview of the concepts and applications for effective campus recreation and sport programming and administration. Of value to current and future leaders in the field of campus recreation and sport. Includes specific field observation experiences.

RTM 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Recreation and Tourism Management (1-3)

Experimental courses in recreation and tourism management, with course content to be determined.

RTM 300. Recreation and Community Development (3)

Prerequisite: Lower division writing requirement. Examination of the multicultural dynamics of urban life, and recreation’s role in building community and in developing youth capacity and indigenous leadership.

RTM 302. Dynamics of Leadership in Recreation and Human Services (3)

Prerequisites: Lower division writing requirement. Includes an analysis of personal leadership theory and small-group dynamics and a review of classic leadership studies, with emphasis on leadership values and methods, including group dynamics, communication, decision making and motivation. Emphasis on competencies and skills needed for successful leadership of small groups. Experiential components are an integral part …

RTM 303. Promotion of the Recreation Experience (3)

Interpretation and promotion of recreation programs and services through the use of media processes and resources, marketing principles and computer applications.

RTM 304. Entrepreneurial Ventures in Recreation and Human Services (3)

Analysis of approaches and techniques necessary to initiate an entrepreneurial start-up in the recreation and human service arenas. Topics include the nature of entrepreneurialism, development of a business plan, organization of the enterprise, financial and operations management, and computer applications.

RTM 305. Dynamics of Early Childhood Play (3)

Study of play in relation to the child’s early growth and development. Implications for functional, environmental and leadership dimensions of organized play experiences in early years. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the Schedule of Classes for the CS Designation.

RTM 306. Leadership Coaching (3)

Preparatory: RTM 302. A basic foundation for understanding and practicing coaching methodology for leadership development. Content includes core coaching competencies and principles, the coaching conversation model, ethics and standards, application of skills necessary for one-to-one coaching to produce positive change in leaders.

RTM 310/L. Adventure Recreation and Human Relations and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: RTM 310L. Explore issues of cultural identity, racial and ethnic diversity, gender, ableism, and self-esteem through readings, written assignments, and recitation. Diversity issues introduced through personal growth and adventure experiences. Regular written assignments required. Lab: Diversity issues introduced through experiential learning in group initiatives, challenge course …

RTM 314. Hospitality and Customer Service (3)

Prerequisite: Lower division writing requirement. Study of various aspects of hospitality and customer service as applied to recreation, tourism and hospitality industries. A systems approach is used to study the design and organization of components of providing outstanding hospitality and customer service.

RTM 330. Women, Leisure and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

Prerequisite: Lower division writing requirement. Examines the relationship among women, ethnicity and leisure. Provides opportunities to investigate a variety of factors affecting women in the U.S. Regular written assignments required. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the Schedule of Classes for …

RTM 351. Outdoor and Environmental Education (3)

Study of outdoor educational philosophy and methods as they apply to the outdoor educator. Includes the history, development and basic principles of outdoor/ environmental education, but emphasizes strategies for teaching, interpreting and program planning in outdoor environments.

RTM 352. Play and Human Potential (3)

Prerequisite: Lower division writing requirement. Examination of the play phenomenon across the lifespan. Exploration, analysis and evaluation of the play phenomenon in development of human potential. Regular written assignments are required. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the Schedule of Classes …

RTM 353/L. Literature of the Wilderness Experience and Lab (2/1)

Prerequisite: Lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: RTM 353L. Review of the writings of various wilderness adventurers both past and present (such as Boone, Powell, Muir, Leopold and Abbey). Emphasis on assessing their experiences in the wilderness, their goals and their methods. Regular written assignments are required. Lab: Allows students to personally experience some of the …

RTM 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Recreation and Tourism Management (3)

Experimental courses in recreation and tourism management, with course content to be determined.

RTM 402. Models of Play, Leisure and Recreation (3)

Examines the historical, theoretical and philosophical foundations of play, leisure and recreation and their relevance to the professional today. Explores how play theory and philosophy impact the provision of service to individuals across the lifespan and with diverse needs. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 403. Evaluation Research in Recreation and Human Services (3)

Investigation into the fields and methods of recreation and leisure systems, including special techniques and concepts of research as applicable to these systems.

RTM 406/L. Enhancing Childhood Creativity and Lab (2/1)

Corequisite: RTM 406L. Integrative seminar and lab experience focusing on the theoretical approaches for enhancing childhood creativity. The uses of play and fantasy are explored as the means for developing programs that are child-oriented. Regular written assignments are required. Available for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with CADV 406/L.)

RTM 414. Food and Beverage Management (3)

Understand food and beverage operations in the hospitality industry. Study operations, food service marketing, menu cost and pricing strategies, hospitality accounting, customer service experiences, facility design, and sanitation and safety issues. Opportunity to qualify for the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) Food and Beverage Management Certification. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 415. Leisure and Aging (3)

Study of the psycho-social aspects of aging as related to leisure and recreation. Implications for functional environmental and leadership dimensions of leisure and recreation experiences in the later years. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the Schedule of Classes for the …

RTM 424. Meetings and Conventions Management (3)

Preparatory: RTM 314. The meetings and conventions sector represents a significant component of hospitality and tourism. Components of planning, coordinating and managing meetings and conventions will be examined. Factors such as impacts, policies, feasibility, and risk management of meetings and conventions will be examined in detail. Case studies will be evaluated and critiqued. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 434. Accommodations Management (3)

Preparatory: RTM 314. Students develop a sound understanding of the accommodations industry. Students will examine techniques, issues, and problems of rooms division management systems, food and beverage, and other functional areas according to hotel category. Review current information technology used in hotel operations. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 444. Nonprofit Organizations and Fund-Development in Leisure and Human Services (3)

Historical survey of the development of the volunteer movement and its leisure function in American society; theory of voluntary participation and philanthropy; structure and function of volunteer boards; and analysis of fund-raising organization and techniques. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 452/L. Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Lab (3/2)

Prerequisite: RTM 351. Corequisite: RTM 452L. Analysis of leadership theory and small group dynamic as they apply to such unique outdoor recreation circumstances as camps, sailing programs or wilderness expedition. Emphasis on the competencies, training, methods and procedures that are critical to the leading of safe outdoor programs. Lab: Development of outdoor leadership through the direct …

RTM 480. Recreational Tourism: Issues and Trends (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the phenomena of domestic and international recreational tourism. Emphasis on investigating and understanding the variables that impact recreational tourism and travel destination areas. Regular written assignments are required.

RTM 481. Principles of Sustainable Tourism (3)

Preparatory: RTM 480. An indepth analysis of the principles and theories of sustainability as they pertain to tourism. Various types of tourism will be examined and evaluated from economic, social and natural environment perspectives. Striking a balance among competing impacts of tourism development will be emphasized. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 490. Challenges in Leisure Services Seminar (3)

Analytical approach to theories and principles of recreation, leisure and play as they relate to field observations and practical applications.

RTM 494C. Supervised Internship (3)

Prerequisites: RTM 490 (required for undergraduate students); Senior standing (required for undergraduate students). Supervised internship in professional recreation settings. Available for graduate credit. (Credit/No Credit only)

RTM 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Recreation and Tourism Management (3)

Experimental courses in recreation and tourism management, with course content to be determined. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 498A-B. Field Assignment and Reports (1-2)

Analysis and reports of the student’s study project in a field site location. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study. Available for graduate credit.

RTM 500. Foundations in Tourism Hospitality and Recreation (3)

This course examines hospitality, tourism, and recreation from psychological, social, and economic perspectives, and reviews different segments of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries.

RTM 510. Trends and Issues in Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation (3)

Identification and analysis of current and future trends, challenges and issues that affect management of tourism, hospitality and recreation services and programs.

RTM 520. Trends and Issues in Recreational Sport (3)

Identification and analysis of current trends, challenges and issues that affect management of recreational sport facilities and programs. An examination of history of the profession, current professional and research issues, along with anticipation and preparation for the future.

RTM 530. Cultural Aspects and Global Perspectives in Tourism (3)

Preparatory: RTM 314 or RTM 480. Addresses issues culture as it is affected by tourism. We will examine issues of authenticity, co modification of culture and the interaction of hosts and guests in different contexts, ranging from the industrialized world to developing countries.

RTM 540. Human Resources in Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation (3)

This course provides an understanding and application of key concepts/practices in human resource management as related to the tourism, hospitality and recreation industries.

RTM 550. Marketing and Promotion in Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation (3)

An in-depth study of the theory and application of marketing and promotion as they relate to the tourism, hospitality and recreation industries.

RTM 560. Facility Design in Recreational Sport (3)

Investigation of principles of design, planning, management and operation of recreational sport facilities. Students will be introduced to facility and event management, facility components, specifications, recreation spaces, specialty areas and facility trends.

RTM 580. Seminar in Tourism Planning: A Cultural and International Perspective (3)

Analysis and evaluation of the impact of historical tourism planning trends and their influence on human services and quality-of-life issues. Advanced study of the application of contemporary tourism planning models.

RTM 600. Law, Risk Management and Ethics in Recreational Sport (3)

Exploration of legal principles, risk management and ethics affecting the management of recreational sport programs. Emphasis will be placed on the rules of law, negligence and risk management theory, constitutional law, contracts and legislation.

RTM 610. Sustainability in Hospitality and Tourism (3)

Addresses issues of sustainability as they pertain to hospitality and tourism. Traditionally, these sectors have operated with a short-term perspective and have been largely consumptive in nature. Students will evaluate principles of sustainability, how they relate to hospitality and tourism, and their effectiveness in different regions of the world.

RTM 620. Effective Teams and Leaders in Tourism, Hospitality, and Recreation Organizations (3)

Application of research on effective teams and executive leadership for organizations in the tourism, hospitality, and recreational sport industries.

RTM 660. Crisis Management for Tourism, Hospitality, or Recreation Organizations (3)

Preparation for and response to a major crisis for a hospitality, tourism, or recreation destination. Students will gain the knowledge and skills to identify potential threats such as a natural disaster or human tragedy and develop disaster mitigation and crisis management procedures from guest safety to media response.

RTM 684. Research Methods and Design (3)

Discussion and application of scientific research in the field of tourism, hospitality, and recreation. Procedure in research design, data collection, data analysis, data presentation, and data interpretation/utilization.

RTM 693A. Supervised Internship I (2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. First of two supervised internships requiring completion of 200 hours in an approved setting in recreational sport management or hospitality, travel and tourism. The supervised internship is designed to provide a hands-on learning experience in management of recreational sport or tourism. The internship will be used as a basis for the culminating graduate …

RTM 693B. Supervised Internship II (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Supervised internships requiring completion of 300 hours in an approved setting in recreational sport management or hospitality or travel and tourism. The supervised internship is designed to provide a hands-on learning experience in management of recreational sport or tourism or hospitality.

RTM 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

This course is for students to enroll in during the preparation and examination phase of their M.S. degree. This course will allow students to review and synthesize the information learned during the program, reflect and assess the level of mastery attained, prepare preparatory case studies and complete their culminating examination. Students will be expected to …

RTM 698. Graduate Project or Thesis (2)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Culminating experience for the graduate degree. Planning, preparation and completion of a graduate project or thesis on an advanced topic in the field of recreational sport management or hospitality, travel and tourism.

RTM 698D. Graduate Culminating Project (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor Consent. Culminating experience for the graduate degree. Planning, preparation and completion of a graduate project on an advanced topic in the field of recreational management or hospitality, travel and tourism.

RTM 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate coordinator. Intensive investigation into the area of specialization.